The rise of the angry voter, charted

It’s a bigly trend with enormous consequences for fiscal and monetary policy. But the rise of voter rage in advanced democracies is a hard narrative to chart, what with the lack of data and the abundance of anecdote. However, this seems a pretty decent attempt:

Screen Shot 2016-10-24 at 13.03.20

Continue reading: The rise of the angry voter, charted

It’s a bigly trend with enormous consequences for fiscal and monetary policy. But the rise of voter rage in advanced democracies is a hard narrative to chart, what with the lack of data and the abundance of anecdote. However, this seems a pretty decent attempt:

Screen Shot 2016-10-24 at 13.03.20

Continue reading: The rise of the angry voter, charted

US political party platforms might matter this year?

A little bit, possibly, for the financial industry.

The main evidence for that can be found in the last-minute addition of a populist proposal to the Republican party platform adopted officially yesterday:

“The Dodd-Frank law, the Democrats’ legislative Godzilla, is crushing small and community banks and other lenders. The Federal Communications Commission is imperiling the freedom of the internet. We support reinstating the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933 which prohibits commercial banks from engaging in high-risk investment.”

That’s a change from the Republicans’ live-and-let-live approach to regulation. Of course, it’s unclear how much that matters — US political parties’ platforms have become a bit of a joke in recent decades, portrayed nicely in a piece from academics Daniel DiSalvo and James Ceaser.

Continue reading: US political party platforms might matter this year?

A little bit, possibly, for the financial industry.

The main evidence for that can be found in the last-minute addition of a populist proposal to the Republican party platform adopted officially yesterday:

"The Dodd-Frank law, the Democrats’ legislative Godzilla, is crushing small and community banks and other lenders. The Federal Communications Commission is imperiling the freedom of the internet. We support reinstating the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933 which prohibits commercial banks from engaging in high-risk investment."

That's a change from the Republicans' live-and-let-live approach to regulation. Of course, it's unclear how much that matters -- US political parties' platforms have become a bit of a joke in recent decades, portrayed nicely in a piece from academics Daniel DiSalvo and James Ceaser.

Continue reading: US political party platforms might matter this year?