Richard Koo’s chart to explain the past 200 years

It may take a few minutes to wrap your head around it, but this chart from Richard Koo, borrowing heavily from the insights of W. Arthur Lewis, is a pretty good framework for understanding the history of the world since the start of the industrial revolution:

For most of human history, technological progress was achingly slow, especially when it came to agricultural productivity. Unable to boost yields, populations couldn’t expand unless additional farmland were brought under cultivation. There were about as many people alive on Earth in the age of Caesar as there were more than a thousand years later. When that finally changed, farmers moved to urban factories and joined the proletariat.

Continue reading: Richard Koo’s chart to explain the past 200 years

It may take a few minutes to wrap your head around it, but this chart from Richard Koo, borrowing heavily from the insights of W. Arthur Lewis, is a pretty good framework for understanding the history of the world since the start of the industrial revolution:

For most of human history, technological progress was achingly slow, especially when it came to agricultural productivity. Unable to boost yields, populations couldn’t expand unless additional farmland were brought under cultivation. There were about as many people alive on Earth in the age of Caesar as there were more than a thousand years later. When that finally changed, farmers moved to urban factories and joined the proletariat.

Continue reading: Richard Koo’s chart to explain the past 200 years

Koo on why helicopter money just won’t work

Helicopter money won’t work in Japan, says Nomura’s Richard Koo in a note on Tuesday, because when the typical Japanese citizen finds a 10,000-yen note lying on the ground, she will turn it in at the nearest police station rather than spend it.

Put differently, a helicopter money policy can only work if the people in a country have little sense of right and wrong.

Koo, of course, is talking about the effectiveness of actual banknotes being thrown out of helicopters in the sky. It’s one of four ways he thinks helicopter money policy could be implemented — since the real challenge with helicopter money is how it would be distributed, and to whom.

Continue reading: Koo on why helicopter money just won’t work

Helicopter money won't work in Japan, says Nomura's Richard Koo in a note on Tuesday, because when the typical Japanese citizen finds a 10,000-yen note lying on the ground, she will turn it in at the nearest police station rather than spend it.

Put differently, a helicopter money policy can only work if the people in a country have little sense of right and wrong.

Koo, of course, is talking about the effectiveness of actual banknotes being thrown out of helicopters in the sky. It's one of four ways he thinks helicopter money policy could be implemented -- since the real challenge with helicopter money is how it would be distributed, and to whom.

Continue reading: Koo on why helicopter money just won’t work

Koo: Why US Quantitative Easing “worked” better than other QEs

This is a guest post from Richard Koo, chief economist of the Nomura Research Institute and, amongst many other things, author of “The Holy Grail of Macroeconomics, Lessons from Japan’s Great Recession”, which lays out his balance sheet recession thesis in detail.

The post is an updated extract from his most recent note for Nomura and reproduced here, with his permission, for your arguing pleasure…

The US, the UK, Japan, and Europe all implemented quantitative easing (QE) policies, but the understanding of how those policies work apparently differs greatly from country to country, leading to very different outcomes. With the US economy doing better than the rest, there has been some debate in Europe as to why that is the case.

Continue reading: Koo: Why US Quantitative Easing “worked” better than other QEs

This is a guest post from Richard Koo, chief economist of the Nomura Research Institute and, amongst many other things, author of “The Holy Grail of Macroeconomics, Lessons from Japan’s Great Recession”, which lays out his balance sheet recession thesis in detail.

The post is an updated extract from his most recent note for Nomura and reproduced here, with his permission, for your arguing pleasure…

The US, the UK, Japan, and Europe all implemented quantitative easing (QE) policies, but the understanding of how those policies work apparently differs greatly from country to country, leading to very different outcomes. With the US economy doing better than the rest, there has been some debate in Europe as to why that is the case.

Continue reading: Koo: Why US Quantitative Easing “worked” better than other QEs