PeerIQ’s Marketplace Lending Securitization Tracker Q4 2016

PeerIQ’s Marketplace Lending Securitization Tracker Q4 2016

Executive Summary Marketplace lending securitization remains a bright spot in the ABS market. Total issuance topped $2.4 Bn this quarter with cumulative issuance now totaling $15.1 Bn. YTD issuance of the sector stands at $7.8 Bn as compared to $4.9 Bn from prior year, a 59% increase. Although MPL origination volumes have declined at some […]

PeerIQ’s Marketplace Lending Securitization Tracker Q4 2016

Executive Summary

Marketplace lending securitization remains a bright spot in the ABS market. Total issuance topped $2.4 Bn this quarter with cumulative issuance now totaling $15.1 Bn. YTD issuance of the sector stands at $7.8 Bn as compared to $4.9 Bn from prior year, a 59% increase.

Although MPL origination volumes have declined at some platforms, the percentage of loans funded through ABS is at a record high of 70%.

The movement towards rated securitizations at larger transaction sizes continues. Further, the growth in average deal size continued, growing to $252 Mn in 2016 as compared to $35 Mn in 2013.

New issuance spreads continued to tighten in—a credit friendly environment for securitization. In 2016, we saw moderate spread compression across senior classes, indicating stable investor appetite for MPL ABS paper in the market.

We estimate $6.3 Bn to $11.2 Bn MPL ABS issuance for 2017. Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, and Citi take top positions on the league tables.

Ratings agencies grow increasingly comfortable with assessing MPL risk. Kroll provided the first rating for a securitization of Madden-Midland loans. DBRS tops the league tables in ratings activity.

We expect higher volatility from rising rates, regulatory uncertainty, and an exit from a period of unusually benign credit conditions. Platforms that can sustain low-cost capital access, build investor confidence via 3rd party tools, and embed strong risk management frameworks will grow and take market share.

Authors:

Wilfred Daye wilfred@peeriq.com

Jianguo Xiao jianguo@peeriq.com

Yishu Song yishu@peeriq.com

Investors should consider PeerIQ as only a single factor in making their investment decision. Please refer to the Disclosure Section, located at the end of this report, for information on disclaimers and disclosures.

Introduction

Marketplace Lending ABS Trends

The fourth quarter of 2016 saw steady growth in MPL securitization. Ten deals priced, totaling $2.4 Bn, another quarter of strong quarterly issuance. Total issuance for 2016 reached $7.8 Bn, as compared to $4.9 Bn for 2015 (59% YOY growth). This growth now brings the total size of MPL securitization issuance volume to date to $15.1 Bn.

Although we continue to see differentiation in credit performance and execution across issuers, overall, investor sentiment has improved dramatically versus a year ago. Spreads on new issue senior consumer MPL ABS have tightened 50% for 2016; and the demand for paper across the capital structure has been over-subscribed for new issuance deals.

The market continued to move towards larger deals with repeat issuers. Further, new issuance pricing spreads tightened, in line with other securitized products, although MPL bonds continue to offer attractive relative value for comparable duration and rated products.

All variations of originators—(i) balance-sheet, (ii) pure marketplace lenders, and (iii) hybrids—have established programs to tap into the ABS markets in 2016. In July, Marlette issued its first unsecured consumer loan MPL ABS deal from its new shelf (MFT). Lending Club introduced the first deal on its branded shelf (LCIT), suggesting a pattern of repeat standardized issuance. Looking ahead in Q1 2017, Upstart and Prosper reportedly intend to inaugurate a securitization program.

Further, SoFi, the largest MPL issuer, has emerged as a model for successful repeat issuance, enjoying a 70 to 110 bps funding cost advantage in senior ABS pricing versus its peers in the student lending category.

Macro Conditions

In a widely expected move, on December 14th, FOMC officials increased the Fed Funds rate by 25 basis points to a target range of between 50 and 75 basis points. The Fed is taking an increasingly hawkish stance due to an improving growth outlook (3.5% annualized growth in Q3), tightening labor market (4.6% unemployment, a nine-year low), and wage growth (91-month high). The ten-year inflation bonds traded at ~2% breakeven rate at the year-end 2016. Further, consumer confidence in the economy is at its highest level since August 2001.

A strong “risk-on” environment has prevailed since the US election. Treasuries have sold off and equity markets haverallied on higher growth and inflation expectations. The UST 10-year bond yield of 2.4% is up a whopping 54 bps since Election Day. Equity markets have rallied and the S&P 500 increased 6.4% post-election.

For 4Q16, overall credit markets have exhibited low volatility and credit conditions remain relatively benign. For instance, implied volatility on 3-month CDX HY options stayed at their historical low of 37%. On-the-run CDX HY traded in a range bound between 375 to 420 basis points. Further, in US CLO market, the median YTD total return (through November 2016) was 2.8% for AAAs, 4.0% for AAs, 5.8% for single-As, and 11.3% for BBBs. The US loan index returned approximately 8.9% from Jan to Nov.

Within the MPL space specifically, the above conditions paired with greater investor acceptance—including the first rated deal consisting of Madden-Midland loans in Lending Club’s LCIT 2016-NP2.

Regulatory Uncertainty Remains High

Concerns of heightened regulatory scrutiny last year have given way to a largely constructive outlook, although regulatory uncertainty remains high.

Platforms are sponsoring self-regulatory efforts via trade associations such as SFIG and the Marketplace Lending Association. The message is resonating. In an important milestone for 2016, US Treasury, Federal Reserve, SEC, and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), each publicly acknowledged that marketplace lending is expanding access to credit to traditionally under-served segments.

Regulatory uncertainty remains high for marketplace lenders that rely on partner-funding bank model. The consensus view is that the risk that courts deem loans originated via the partner-funding bank model as invalid is low, although such an outcome, however remote, is paired with high severity.

In November, Thomas Curry, head of the OCC, announced that the agency would grant national bank charters to qualifying FinTech firms. Curry cited “public interest,” a “patchwork of supervision,” and the “great potential to expand financial inclusion” as motivations for the charter.

The charter would offer pre-emption—the ability of chartered FinTechs to export rates across state lines—and avoid the need for disparate state-by-state licensing or originating via partner-funding banks. In constructing the guidelines, the OCC seeks to continue to foster financial inclusion via FinTech innovation, while maintaining public confidence in national banks and the banking system more generally.

The supervisory guidelines in the proposal require, among other provisions, a top-down culture of compliance, a risk assessment and management framework, and to-be-specified capital and liquidity rules. (See here for PeerIQ’s summary of the supervisory guidelines).

The strict qualitative criteria suggest that the charter will be awarded sparingly, case-by-case, and to FinTechs that do not have going-concern risk. More fundamentally, the charter does not address the core funding and liquidity issues impacting the sector. The OCC is accepting comments on the charter and is expected to release final rules in April 2017.

Finally, there several new legislative proposals relevant to the MPL sector, which we summarize below:

Warehouse financing costs remain elevated due to a limited supply of warehouse finance, limited credit performance data, and concerns on data integrity (see CAN Capital credit facility breach).

We observe credit facility financing costs on unsecured personal loans in the 3.5% to 6.5% range. Financing costs are a function of counterparty risk, data integrity, asset class, credit performance, recourse vs. non-recourse financing, and ability to offload risk via an active ABS market.

 

Access to financing and liquidity continues to be central concern for investors in MPL space. This sentiment was highlighted when equity shares of OnDeck surged 5.4% immediately after the announcement of $200 Mn credit facility with Credit Suisse on December 9th.

Other publicly reported credit facility financings in the quarter include Fundation ($100 Mn line from GS), Solar Mosaic ($250 Mn from DB), and We Lab ($25 Mn line from ING Bank), and Apple Pie (SunTrust Bank).

Trigger Breaches

At the end of Q3, PeerIQ predicted several trigger breaches would take place in the ensuing months.

Trigger breaches are manifestation of unexpected credit performance, poor credit modeling, unguarded structuring practice. The average time to breach performance triggers for consumer MPL ABS deals was approximately 11 month as collateral losses ramped up within the deal.

 

During the past three months, four unsecured consumer and one SME deals had breached triggers. The exhibit below summarizes the ten active deals that had breached triggers in MPL ABS sector (eight unsecured consumer and two SME deals) with $1.3 Bn of total issuance volume (Note: below we excluded two additional retired deals that breached triggers (MPLT 2015-OD2 and MPLT 2015-OD1).

 

 

After two years of seasoning, CAN re-classified a portion of collateral loans that were represented as current but should have been treated as delinquent in CAN 2014-1A transaction—a material breach in representations and warranties. The newly identified delinquent loans also led to breach of the minimum excess spread trigger.

The negative headline associated with trigger breaches increased the cost and availability of funding for originators. The growing number of deals breaching triggers in MPL ABS are leading marketplace lenders taking greater control of their ABS programs to set standards and structure.

Sponsors and ABS investors are using sophisticated 3rd party analytics such as those offered by PeerIQ to independently model deal economics and monitor collateral on an on-going basis, perform 3rd party credit validation and verification.

Data & Standardization

Ratings agencies continued to raise the quality and history of data as key factors in their rating assessments. The paucity of historical data increases the error range on cumulative loss estimates which makes ratings assessment difficult.

Finally, we note that the Structured Finance Industry Group (SFIG) workstream on data reporting standards (including PeerIQ as a key participant) released a “Green Paper” providing for data reporting standards. SFIG also has a workstream on representations & warranties across originators—a welcome development for the sector.

Definitions and Inclusion Rules

Our Tracker includes all issuances connected to assets originated by marketplace lending platforms, which we define as including both:

  • Online and other novel technologies to increase operational efficiency, risk accuracy, and borrower experience, and
  • Non-deposit funding for lending capital.

We recognize there is rapid innovation in lending channels, and welcome all comments and consideration on inclusion rules.

  1. Quarterly Round-up

Despite holiday season slowdown, this past quarter saw ten securitization deals, adding $2.4 Bn in new issuance, consistent with Q3 record deal flow. This represents 23.0% YoY growth in total issuance year-to-date and 3.7% growth from Q3, Indeed, MPL securitization remains a bright spot in the ABS world, with its 23.0% YoY growth.

Total securitization issuance to date now stands at $15.1 Bn, with 72 deals issued to date (43 Consumer, 20 Student, 1 Mortgage and 8 SME) since September 2013 (Exhibit 1).

 

Examining issuance by underlying collateral segment, we see that Consumer and Student have similar volumes, with Consumer continuing to lead with $7.1 Bn issued to date, as compared to Student at $6.0 Bn (Exhibit 2). Issuance activities in the Small-Medium Enterprise (SME) space was muted for the quarter. SME remains the smallest segment with $1.7 Bn total issuance.

There were eight new deals in Q4 2016:

  • SoFi: SOFI 2016-E, SCLP 2016-3, SCLP 2016-5, SOFI 2016-F, SFPMT 2016-1
  • LendingClub: LCIT 2016-NP2, MHMT 2016-LC1
  • Earnest: EARN 2016-D
  • Prosper: INSKT 2016-1
  • CommonBond: CBSLT 2016-B

This quarter, SoFi priced its inaugural residential mortgage-backed securitization, which is backed by a $169 Mn pool of first-lien, fixed-rate, prime residential mortgage loans originated by SoFi. SFPMT 2016-1, led by Barclays, will issue four classes of super senior notes, and two tranches of supportive senior notes. (See PeerIQ newsletter for further analysis.)

Since 2010, the market has issued approximately $40 Bn of prime jumbo securitizations dominated by bank players like J.P. Morgan and Credit Suisse, with combined new issuance market share of over 50%. SoFi’s inaugural prime jumbo securitization had demonstrated its ability to grow through value-added origination across verticals, starting with student loan refinance, unsecured consumer loans, and then mortgages. It also supports our thesis that the demarcation line between FinTech and traditional asset classes will be blurred as this emerging industry grows.

In addition to the expansion into new collateral category prime jumbo mortgages, rating agency blessing continues to be a key driver for strong deal execution. All deals issued in 4Q16 were rated by at least one rating agency (Exhibit 5), except for MHMT 2016-LC1 and INSKT 2016-1. As of today, we track 120 MPL ABS rated by rating agencies, of which, 24% were rated in 4Q16, representing stabilized rating agency participation (Exhibit 6). Again, we expect that the vast majority of MPL ABS to be rated as issuers seek to broaden the base of eligible investors.

 

Of note, in Q4, Jefferies brought the first rated LendingClub Near-Prime securitization LCIT 2016-NP2 into the market. This second LCIT shelf deal is also consisted of Madden-Midland loans in its collateral pool. Given the collateral pool of the LCIT 2016-NP1 (unrated) and NP2 (rated) deals are similar and tranches have the identical credit enhancement, the expected loss of each tranche should also be comparable. However, the pricing for LCIT 2016-NP2 A (BBB-rated) was about 75 basis points tighter than LCIT 2016-NP1 A (Non-rated) tranche.

The emergence of rated securities from LCIT shelf also supports our belief that the rating agencies are more comfortable in rating this nascent industry with more historical performance data. Issuers are more inclined to get their deals rated to expand their investor base and increase their credibility with investors.

On the SME front, despite lack of new issuance for the quarter, OnDeck, the leading SME online lender, closed a $200 Mn DBRS A- rated asset-backed revolving debt facility with Credit Suisse, Prime OnDeck Receivable Trust II. The rating of the Class A Loans reflected the 18% of initial hard credit enhancement comprised of the 1% reserve account and 17% overcollateralization. Additional credit support may be provided from excess spread available in the structure.

Finally, deals continue to increase in average deal size over time, led primarily by SoFi’s large placements. The average securitization deal now stands at $267 Mn for 2016.

  1. MPL Securitization League Tables

We continue to see Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley ramping up deal participation aggressively in Q4. Maintaining its one number rank on league table, Goldman Sachs was involved in $3.6 Bn in total new issuance, a 44% growth from 3Q16. GS worked with SoFi, CommonBond, and Earnest and other originators to capture about 23% of the market share in MPL ABS by issuance volume. Further, Morgan Stanley showed 60% growth in deal participation with $3.3 Bn in total volume for the quarter, a 4% increase in market share from 3Q2016. Top three dealers, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, and Citi, took over about 50% of the total market share in MPL space.

Further, as mentioned in our 3Q2016 tracker, banks had pulled back from financing business in MPL space due to recent headlines, regulatory risks, or firm-specific considerations. Yet, dealers continued to display heightened interest in MPL ABS securitization, intermediating originators’ demand for financing and absolute investors’ desire for yield. In particular, we saw Mizuho Securities participated its first MPL ABS transaction (SOFI 2016-F) with Morgan Stanley in December.

As evidenced by the continued issuance, the impact of Dodd-Frank risk retention rules, effective on December 24, 2016, has not led to an appreciable slowdown in new issuance activities. The risk retention rule had indeed slowed down the issuance activities and led to consolidation for mature securitization markets such as Commercial Mortgage Backed Securities (CMBS) and Collateralized Loan Obligation (CLO) market.

Overall, the rule suggested that securitizers will need to commit approximately $23 Bn of new capital to sustain current overall new issuance securitization market in US.

The negative impact of risk retention is masked and by the growth rate of the MPL ABS market and by dealers’ positioning to gain market share.

Turning to the co-manager league table, SoFi doubled deal volume this quarter to $3.0 Bn. As telegraphed by SoFi, SoFi ended 2016 with twelve new deals across student, personal, and mortgage verticals. SoFi is the co-manager for almost all of its deals, capturing approximately 40% of total new issuance (Exhibit 7).

Deutsche Bank raced head of BoA and took over the second position with $684 Mn of deal volume on the co-manager league table, continuing its growth with strong conviction in supporting the MPL ecosystem. The top three co-managers on the league table took over approximately 60% of the total market share. Greensledge, replacing Credit Suisse, stepped into the six place with $421 Mn in deal participation.

Kroll, S&P and Fitch in the amount of rated bonds. DBRS rated $6.4 Bn Student MPL ABS, or approximately 47% of sub-segment, competing primarily against Moody’s within the student sector. Kroll dominates the Consumer MPL ABS category with about 50% market share. The mortgage sub-segment currently has an even split amongst DBRS, Fitch and Kroll.

III. New Issuance Spreads

New issuance spreads in 4Q16 continued to tighten across capital structures, reflecting a healthy risk appetite in the capital markets. Further, we saw a continued preference for senior tranches over riskier subordinated bonds. As reflected in the exhibit below, this overall senior preference leads to a steepening of the overall term structure, with investors demanding higher premiums for riskier tranches— and this remains true across all loan segments. This is particularly evident in student sub-segment. Credit spread curves shifted downward in parallel, suggesting an overall yield compression and favorable credit environment in 4Q16.

  1. Outlook

The outlook for the year ahead presents new challenges and opportunities for marketplace lenders.

We expect higher volatility from rising rates, increased regulatory uncertainty, and an exit from a post-crisis period characterized by unusually benign credit performance.

We see opportunities for lenders, as consumer borrowers move out of the de-leveraging phase, which expands the total addressable market. We also see increased bank partnerships as banks seek to improve their ROE and cover their cost of capital by partnering with MPL originators.

Higher Interest Rates

High financing costs continue to driving a wedge between would-be whole loan buyers and originators. Higher short-term interest rates from a Fed tightening cycle will further reduce net margins for whole loan investors.

Platforms that can successfully pass on rates to borrowers to offset the reduction in net interest margin reduction, increase operating efficiencies, or improve execution in the ABS market stand to take market share. We expect Fed rate hike as a continuation of a tightening cycle. Higher rates will leader to higher ABS coupons for 2017. Therefore, we expect to see originators re-price interest rates on MPL loans.

Higher Volatility from Regulatory Uncertainty

Although the regulatory outlook is constructive, regulatory uncertainty remains high.

Market participants are optimistic. Financial stocks as reflected by the KBW Index have rallied over 20% since Election Day pricing in greater growth from deregulation and earnings from higher rates. Markets expect a bias to action from the Trump administration, a more favorable regulatory outlook, and potential for relief on risk retention, bank capital

  • liquidity requirements, and a reduction in CFPB and SEC enforcement actions. Markets appear to be pricing in near perfect execution of an idealized regulatory environment. We see this as unlikely.

The President-elect Trump’s transition team, including the nominee for Treasury Secretary, has indicated the new administration wants to “strip back” parts of Dodd-Frank. While the new administration has made some general statements about Dodd-Frank, it’s too early to tell which changes may materialize.

Within MPL specifically, the SEC, the OCC, and state regulators have differing views on jurisdiction and approach to regulation.

Moreover, given the cloture rules in the Senate which require 60 votes to overcome a filibuster, we expect the pace of regulatory relief will be slower than most market participants expect

Re-Normalization of Credit Performance

We are now seven years behind the Great Recession. Consistent with Fair Credit Reporting Act waiting period requirements, derogatory credit items (“derogs”) associated with bankruptcy, foreclosure, and short sales will fall off borrower credit bureau reports in 2017. As a result, we expect an expansion of credit eligible borrowers.

Also, borrowers that defended their credit scores through the cycle have positively self-selected. All things being equal, a borrower with a credit score of 700 today is not as strong as a borrower with a score of 700 after the Great Recession.

For 2017, we expect:

  1. Robust growth—a 47% increase in ABS volumes and greater dealer participation
  1. Continued shift to standardized, repeat issuance
  1. New products and additional modes of distribution
  1. Continued trend of bank partnership
  1. Greater investments in 3rd party solutions to improve investor confidence

Continued Growth in ABS Issuance Volumes

As marketplace lending loan growth rates in the US have accelerated over the last few years, lenders have become increasingly reliant on institutional capital, with many platforms particularly focused on securitization as core pillar of funding.

Rated securitization has moved from a coming-of-age milestone in the maturation of an originator, to an essential pillar for funding new origination. We forecast a 47% growth in ABS issuance under our base case scenario.

The re-normalization of credit performance will create significant analytical challenges for underwriting and investment analysis. For instance, as losses will revert to historical levels, models trained on post-crisis data will tend to underestimate losses.

Further, lenders face new constraints in how they manage their risk from consumer protection regulation such as the CARD Act of 2009, which among other rules, eliminated “universal default” as a mechanism for mitigating risk.

Advanced risk analytics and historical data (such as offerings produced from uniting the TransUnion dataset with PeerIQ analytics) will play an important role in risk assessment and management for originations and investors alike.

Strong ABS Issuance Outlook

As we noted in our prior securitization tracker, numerous factors—platform rate increases, tighter underwriting, spread tightening in the primary and secondary ABS markets—improve the economics for whole loan buyers that fund via securitization.

Exhibit 15 below confirms our thesis that securitization is an essential pillar for the marketplace lending industry. Our analysis finds that the percentage of loans securitized via ABS stands at an all-time high of 70%.

 

Shifting Towards Standardized and Repeat Issuance

We anticipate greater participation in the securitization space as one-off issuers seek to become repeat issuers to optimize deal cost and capital market distribution.

PeerIQ anticipates the rise of contributed collateral “club deals” as platforms seek to dive standardization in deal terms while also offering whole loan investors a quarterly path to liquidity.

The growth in club deals will usher in a higher level of data homogenization, greater consistency in deal structure, increased data integrity, and consistent valuation methods.

New Products and Additional Modes of Distribution

Outside of securitization, additional modes of distribution will emerge. RiverNorth received SEC approval for a MPL-dedicated close-end fund in Q3, signaling the maturation of another major funding source for marketplace lending platforms. Other auxiliary funding channels including asset managers offering term capital, CUSIPs, private equity, and seasoning vehicles will expand the investors base for marketplace lending category.

Bank Partnerships

The seismic regulatory changes post the Great Recession of 2008 has forced the global banking sector to adjust the pre-2008 business model.

We argued in prior research that banks can improve their ROE position by funding or financing whole loans from marketplace lenders, and that most banks will choose to partner with marketplace lenders rather than compete.

We believe 2017 will feature a number of bank partnerships with non-banks, and increased competition from traditional banks.

We expect traditional banks to cooperate with marketplace lenders to marry their low-cost funding profile with low-cost operations of marketplace lenders.

Greater Investments in 3rd Party Solutions

To gain investor confidence, marketplace lenders are now adjusting to the demand from warehouse lenders and whole loan investors for greater transparency and due diligence, including independent reviews, “hot” back-up servicing arrangements, verification, credit validation and heightened data integrity standards.

Further, the recent uptick in delinquency and losses in SME and other sub-segments, in general, leads to a persistent focus on fundamentals, such as credit underwriting and acquisition cost.

Originators and ABS investors will extend their investments in 3rd party data and analytics for a variety of investment and distribution activities, such as structuring deal waterfalls, determining deal collateral triggers, monitoring deal performance, coordinating club securitization deals, and improving investor confidence with loan-level data transparency.

The above trends highlight the need for 3rd party analytics, such as those offered by PeerIQ, to improve transparency, standardization, comparability, with the goal of improving investor confidence and the smooth functioning of ABS markets.

We remain optimistic on the marketplace lending ecosystem. The broad secular trends underpinning non-bank lending growth and the global demand for yield remain intact.

Appendix: Marketplace Lending Securitizations to Date

Ticker Type Originator Shelf Issuer Issue Date Collat Amt Credit Amt Initial WAL Coupo Initial Est. Mood S&P DBR Fitc Kroll Rate
($mm) Support ($mm) (yrs) n Type Coupo Pricing ys S h d
SOFI 2016-F A1 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 22-Dec-16 131.66 16.1% 40.7 3.22 Floating 1.95 n/a A2 Rated
SOFI 2016-F A2 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 22-Dec-16 131.66 16.1% 82.8 3.48 Fixed 3.02 n/a A2 Rated
SOFI 2016-F B Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 22-Dec-16 131.66 11.0% 7.2 9.51 Variable 4.45 n/a Baa2 Rated
LCIT 2016-NP2 A Consumer Lending Club LCIT LendingClub 2-Dec-16 121.73 35.5% 85.3 1.6 Fixed 3.00 195 BBB Rated
LCIT 2016-NP2 B Consumer Lending Club LCIT LendingClub 2-Dec-16 121.73 23.0% 16.4 2.4 Fixed 6.00 458 BB+ Rated
SFPMT 2016-1A 1A6 Mortgage SoFi SFPMT SoFi 1-Dec-16 168.79 15.0% 84.1 4.8 Variable 3.00 220 AAA AAA AAA Rated
SFPMT 2016-1A 1A8 Mortgage SoFi SFPMT SoFi 1-Dec-16 168.79 15.0% 28.0 4.8 Variable 3.00 210 AAA AAA AAA Rated
SFPMT 2016-1A 1AMF Mortgage SoFi SFPMT SoFi 1-Dec-16 168.79 6.1% 11.8 4.8 Variable 3.00 250 AAA AAA AAA Rated
SFPMT 2016-1A 2A6 Mortgage SoFi SFPMT SoFi 1-Dec-16 168.79 15.0% 23.5 3.66 Variable 2.50 195 AAA AAA AAA Rated
SFPMT 2016-1A 2A8 Mortgage SoFi SFPMT SoFi 1-Dec-16 168.79 15.0% 7.8 3.66 Variable 2.50 180 AAA AAA AAA Rated
SFPMT 2016-1A 2AMF Mortgage SoFi SFPMT SoFi 1-Dec-16 168.79 6.1% 3.3 3.66 Variable 2.50 215 AAA AAA AAA Rated
SFPMT 2016-1A B1 Mortgage SoFi SFPMT SoFi 1-Dec-16 168.79 3.7% 4.0 n/a Variable 3.17 n/a AA AA AA Rated
SFPMT 2016-1A B2 Mortgage SoFi SFPMT SoFi 1-Dec-16 168.79 2.3% 2.4 n/a Variable 3.17 n/a A A A Rated
SFPMT 2016-1A B3 Mortgage SoFi SFPMT SoFi 1-Dec-16 168.79 1.6% 1.2 n/a Variable 3.17 n/a BBB BBB BBB Rated
SFPMT 2016-1A B4 Mortgage SoFi SFPMT SoFi 1-Dec-16 168.79 1.1% 0.9 n/a Variable 3.17 n/a BB BB BB Rated
SFPMT 2016-1A B5 Mortgage SoFi SFPMT SoFi 1-Dec-16 168.79 0.6% 0.8 n/a Variable 3.17 n/a B B B Rated
SFPMT 2016-1A B6 Mortgage SoFi SFPMT SoFi 1-Dec-16 168.79 0.0% 1.0 n/a Variable 3.17 n/a 0
SOFI 2016-E A1 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 22-Nov-16 584.42 16.4% 164.6 2.97 Floating 1.38 85 Aaa AAA Rated
SOFI 2016-E A2A Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 22-Nov-16 584.42 16.5% 203.3 1.25 Fixed 1.63 55
SOFI 2016-E A2B Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 22-Nov-16 584.42 16.5% 155.2 4.63 Fixed 2.49 90 Aaa AAA Rated
SOFI 2016-E B Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 22-Nov-16 584.42 10.6% 37.0 n/a Fixed 3.44 175
SOFI 2016-E C Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 22-Nov-16 584.42 6.7% 24.4 8.43 Variable 4.43 265 Baa2 AL Rated
SCLP 2016-5 A Consumer SoFi SCLP SoFi 18-Nov-16 250.02 25.2% 188.3 1.86 Fixed 3.06 n/a A A+ Rated
SCLP 2016-5 B Consumer SoFi SCLP SoFi 18-Nov-16 250.02 15.1% 25.4 4.98 Fixed 4.55 n/a
INSKT 2016-1 A Consumer Prosper INSKT Insikt 2-Nov-16 24.80 30.7% 17.2 1.02 Fixed 4.00 n/a
INSKT 2016-1 B Consumer Prosper INSKT Insikt 2-Nov-16 24.80 9.2% 5.3 3.23 Fixed 11.00 n/a
EARN 2016-D A1 Student Earnest EARN Earnest 31-Oct-16 174.74 13.5% 51.3 3.69 Floating 2.16 140 A AAL Rated
EARN 2016-D A2 Student Earnest EARN Earnest 31-Oct-16 174.74 13.5% 104.2 3.56 Fixed 2.72 155 A AAL Rated
EARN 2016-D B Student Earnest EARN Earnest 31-Oct-16 174.74 6.1% 13.4 4.16 Fixed 3.80 260 BBB Rated
EARN 2016-D C Student Earnest EARN Earnest 31-Oct-16 174.74 2.9% 5.9 4.33 Fixed 4.39 500 BB Rated
CBSLT 2016-B A1 Student CommonBond CBSLT CommonBond 20-Oct-16 168.63 15.0% 86.7 3.92 Fixed 2.73 155 A1 AAL Rated
CBSLT 2016-B A2 Student CommonBond CBSLT CommonBond 20-Oct-16 168.63 15.0% 64.2 3.79 Floating 2.21 145 A1 AAL Rated
CBSLT 2016-B B Student CommonBond CBSLT CommonBond 20-Oct-16 168.63 5.0% 17.7 4.4 Fixed 4.00 280 BBB Rated
MHMT 2016-LC1 A Consumer Lending Club MHMT Prospect 13-Oct-16 314.14 35.5% 204.2 0.62 Fixed 4.19 336
MHMT 2016-LC1 B Consumer Lending Club MHMT Prospect 13-Oct-16 314.14 23.0% 39.3 1.63 Fixed 6.15 396
MHMT 2016-LC1 C Consumer Lending Club MHMT Prospect 13-Oct-16 314.14 10.0% 39.3 2 Fixed 10.00 n/a
SCLP 2016-3 A Consumer SoFi SCLP SoFi 13-Oct-16 599.94 24.7% 451.7 1.85 Fixed 3.05 200 A A Rated
SCLP 2016-3 B Consumer SoFi SCLP SoFi 13-Oct-16 599.94 14.6% 60.9 4.97 Variable 4.49 233 BBB BBB Rated
SOFI 2016-D A1 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 19-Sep-16 483.04 29.6% 142.8 3.31 Floating 1.60 95 Aaa AAA Rated
SOFI 2016-D A2A Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 19-Sep-16 483.04 27.8% 134.4 1.22 Fixed 1.53 55 Aaa AAA Rated
SOFI 2016-D A2B Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 19-Sep-16 483.04 26.7% 128.8 5.02 Fixed 2.34 110 Aaa AAA Rated
SOFI 2016-D B Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 19-Sep-16 483.04 6.4% 30.7 8.77 Variable 3.23 175 A1 AAL Rated
SCLP 2016-4 A Consumer SoFi SCLP SoFi 13-Sep-16 223.10 20.5% 178.5 1.96 Fixed 3.18 214 A Rated
SCLP 2016-4 B Consumer SoFi SCLP SoFi 13-Sep-16 223.10 17.0% 7.8 5 Variable 4.83 358 BBB+ Rated
SCLP 2016-4 C Consumer SoFi SCLP SoFi 13-Sep-16 223.10 9.5% 16.7 5.12 Variable 5.92 467 BBB- Rated
CILO 2016-LD1 A Consumer Cross River Bank CILO Ellington 24-Aug-16 112.91 30.0% 87.0 1.18 FIXED 3.96 396
CILO 2016-LD1 B Consumer Cross River Bank CILO Ellington 24-Aug-16 112.91 15.0% 18.7 3.13 FIXED 5.50 550
AVNT 2016-C A Consumer Avant AVNT Avant 16-Aug-16 312.59 56.9% 138.0 0.39 Fixed 2.96 350 A- Rated
AVNT 2016-C B Consumer Avant AVNT Avant 16-Aug-16 312.59 31.5% 79.2 1.56 Fixed 4.92 700 BBB- Rated
AVNT 2016-C C Consumer Avant AVNT Avant 16-Aug-16 312.59 19.3% 38.1 2.5 Fixed 8.83 779 BB Rated
LCIT 2016-NP1 A Consumer Lending Club LCIT LendingClub 4-Aug-16 135.48 n/a 86.7 n/a Fixed 3.75 297
LCIT 2016-NP1 B Consumer Lending Club LCIT LendingClub 4-Aug-16 135.48 n/a 16.7 n/a Fixed 6.50 560
MFT 2016-1A A Consumer Cross River Bank MFT Marlette 2-Aug-16 205.44 72.5% 148.9 n/a Fixed 3.06 225 A Rated
MFT 2016-1A B Consumer Cross River Bank MFT Marlette 2-Aug-16 205.44 8.7% 18.0 n/a Fixed 4.78 385 BBB Rated
MFT 2016-1A C Consumer Cross River Bank MFT Marlette 2-Aug-16 205.44 8.7% 18.0 n/a Fixed 9.09 825 BB Rated
SCLP 2016-2 A Consumer SoFi SCLP SoFi 1-Aug-16 575.52 26.5% 425.9 1.84 Fixed 3.09 215 A A Rated
SCLP 2016-2 B Consumer SoFi SCLP SoFi 1-Aug-16 575.52 17.0% 54.7 4.87 Variable 4.77 365 BBB BBB Rated
EARN 2016-C A1 Student Earnest EARN Earnest 29-Jul-16 200.75 28.3% 56.8 3.62 Floating 2.33 185 AAL Rated
EARN 2016-C A2 Student Earnest EARN Earnest 29-Jul-16 200.75 59.3% 119.0 3.57 Fixed 2.68 180 AAL Rated
EARN 2016-C B Student Earnest EARN Earnest 29-Jul-16 200.75 6.8% 13.7 4.03 Fixed 4.46 340 BBB Rated

 

Ticker Type Originator Shelf Issuer Issue Date Collat Amt Credit Amt ($mm) Initial WAL Coupon Initial Est. Moodys S&P DBRS   Fitch Kroll Rated
($mm) Support (%) (yrs) Type Coupon Pricing
SOFI 2016-C A1 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 27-Jul-16 467.50 27.5% 128.6 3.26 Floating 1.59 110 Aaa AAA Rated
SOFI 2016-C A2A Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 27-Jul-16 467.50 30.5% 142.5 1.26 Fixed 1.48 65 Aaa AAA Rated
SOFI 2016-C A2B Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 27-Jul-16 467.50 26.0% 121.7 4.98 Fixed 2.36 135 Aaa AAA Rated
SOFI 2016-C B Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 27-Jul-16 467.50 6.4% 29.8 8.49 Variable 3.35 200 A2 AAL Rated
SCLP 2016-1 A Consumer SoFi SCLP SoFi 27-Jun-16 506.40 25.5% 379.8 2.3 Fixed 3.26 238 A A Rated
SOFI 2016-B A1 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 26-May-16 427.03 23.7% 101.4 3.28 Floating 1.72 120 Aaa AAA Rated
SOFI 2016-B A2A Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 26-May-16 427.03 28.7% 122.7 1.14 Fixed 1.68 80 Aaa AAA Rated
SOFI 2016-B A2B Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 26-May-16 427.03 30.8% 131.5 4.78 Fixed 2.74 145 Aaa AAA Rated
SOFI 2016-B B Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 26-May-16 427.03 5.6% 24.1 8.25 Fixed 3.80 225 A2 AH Rated
ONDK 2016-1A A SME OnDeck ONDK OnDeck 17-May-16 265.96 23.6% 211.5 2.28 Fixed 4.21 325 BBB+ A Rated
ONDK 2016-1A B SME OnDeck ONDK OnDeck 17-May-16 265.96 9.6% 38.5 2.71 Fixed 7.63 670 BB- BBBL Rated
EARN 2016-B A1 Student Earnest EARN Earnest 11-May-16 241.93 27.2% 65.8 3.69 Floating 2.57 205 A A Rated
EARN 2016-B A2 Student Earnest EARN Earnest 11-May-16 241.93 61.9% 149.6 3.5 Fixed 3.02 200 A A Rated
EARN 2016-B B Student Earnest EARN Earnest 11-May-16 241.93 4.0% 9.6 4.17 Variable 4.81 375 BBB BBB+ Rated
AVNT 2016-B A Consumer Avant AVNT Avant 28-Apr-16 344.83 49.1% 179.1 0.56 Fixed 3.92 325 A- Rated
AVNT 2016-B B Consumer Avant AVNT Avant 28-Apr-16 344.83 26.8% 76.7 1.83 Fixed 7.80 700 BBB- Rated
AVNT 2016-B C Consumer Avant AVNT Avant 28-Apr-16 344.83 13.8% 44.8 2.73 Fixed 10.60 1,150 BB Rated
CBSLT 2016-A A1 Student CommonBond CBSLT CommonBond 21-Apr-16 162.72 57.6% 93.8 4.3 Fixed 3.32 225 AH Rated
CBSLT 2016-A A2 Student CommonBond CBSLT CommonBond 21-Apr-16 162.72 29.9% 48.6 4.21 Floating 2.72 225 AH Rated
CBSLT 2016-A B Student CommonBond CBSLT CommonBond 21-Apr-16 162.72 6.6% 10.8 4.2 Fixed 4.00 395 BBB Rated
CHAI 2016-PM1 A Consumer Prosper CHAI Citi 31-Mar-16 314.56 33.0% 212.3 0.97 Fixed 4.65 400 A- A Rated
CHAI 2016-PM1 B Consumer Prosper CHAI Citi 31-Mar-16 314.56 25.1% 24.9 2.44 Fixed 7.67 700 BBB- BBB Rated
CHAI 2016-PM1 C Consumer Prosper CHAI Citi 31-Mar-16 314.56 12.0% 41.2 2.83 Fixed 10.26 1,145 B BB- Rated
CHAI 2016-MF1 A Consumer Marlette CHAI Citi 4-Mar-16 156.50 28.0% 113.5 n/a Fixed 4.48 400 A Rated
CHAI 2016-MF1 B Consumer Marlette CHAI Citi 4-Mar-16 156.50 19.2% 13.7 n/a Fixed 6.64 600 BBB Rated
CHAI 2016-MF1 C Consumer Marlette CHAI Citi 4-Mar-16 156.50 10.5% 13.7 n/a Fixed 10.39 990 BB Rated
SOFI 2016-A A1 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 4-Mar-16 591.51 22.6% 133.6 3.8 Floating 2.27 200 Aa2 AAA Rated
SOFI 2016-A A2 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 4-Mar-16 591.51 62.2% 367.9 3.65 Fixed 2.76 205 Aa2 AAA Rated
SOFI 2016-A B Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 4-Mar-16 591.51 8.4% 49.9 4.14 Fixed 3.57 350 Baa2 BBBH Rated
AVNT 2016-A A Consumer Avant AVNT Avant 26-Feb-16 344.91 51.0% 172.4 0.45 Fixed 4.11 350 A- Rated
AVNT 2016-A B Consumer Avant AVNT Avant 26-Feb-16 344.91 30.0% 72.4 1.68 Fixed 7.65 700 BBB- Rated
AVNT 2016-A C Consumer Avant AVNT Avant 26-Feb-16 344.91 14.0% 55.2 2.66 Fixed 9.79 na BB Rated
MPLT 2016-LD1 A Consumer LoanDepot MPLT Jefferies 19-Feb-16 100.00 26.0% 74.0 1.31 Fixed 5.25 451
MPLT 2016-LD1 B Consumer LoanDepot MPLT Jefferies 19-Feb-16 100.00 11.5% 14.5 3.89 Fixed 9.50 849
EARN 2016-A A1 Student Earnest EARN Earnest 10-Feb-16 119.48 29.1% 34.7 3.51 Floating 1.99 215 A Rated
EARN 2016-A A2 Student Earnest EARN Earnest 10-Feb-16 119.48 58.8% 70.2 3.51 Fixed 2.50 215 A Rated
EARN 2016-A B Student Earnest EARN Earnest 10-Feb-16 119.48 5.9% 7.1 3.8 Fixed 2.50 290 BBB Rated
MPLT 2015-OD4 A SME OnDeck MPLT Jefferies 24-Dec-15 151.21 15.0% 134.9 n/a Fixed 3.25 287 A Rated
MPLT 2015-OD4 B SME OnDeck MPLT Jefferies 24-Dec-15 151.21 5.0% 15.9 n/a Fixed 5.25 412 BBB Rated
CHAI 2015-PM3 A Consumer Prosper CHAI Citi 18-Dec-15 299.11 46.5% 161.5 0.78 Fixed 2.56 190 (P)A3 A+ Rated
CHAI 2015-PM3 B Consumer Prosper CHAI Citi 18-Dec-15 299.11 26.5% 59.8 2.2 Fixed 4.31 350 (P)Baa3 BBB+ Rated
CHAI 2015-PM3 C Consumer Prosper CHAI Citi 18-Dec-15 299.11 12.0% 43.4 3.37 Fixed 6.99 525 (P)Ba3 BB- Rated
MPLT 2015-CB2 A Consumer CircleBack MPLT Jefferies 15-Dec-15 151.20 22.0% 119.4 n/a Fixed 5.00 na
MPLT 2015-CB2 B Consumer CircleBack MPLT Jefferies 15-Dec-15 151.20 17.0% 7.6 n/a Fixed 6.50 na
AMPLT 2015-A A Consumer Avant AMPLT Avant 19-Nov-15 194.40 30.0% 136.1 1.07 Fixed 5.00 406
AMPLT 2015-A B Consumer Avant AMPLT Avant 19-Nov-15 194.40 20.0% 19.4 1.66 Fixed 6.75 581
AMPLT 2015-A C Consumer Avant AMPLT Avant 19-Nov-15 194.40 10.0% 19.4 1.66 Fixed 8.75 781
SOFI 2015-D A1 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 18-Nov-15 573.04 27.0% 154.9 3.86 Floating 2.02 150 Aa2 AAA Rated
SOFI 2015-D A2 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 18-Nov-15 573.04 58.4% 334.8 3.74 Fixed 2.72 150 Aa2 AAA Rated
SOFI 2015-D B Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 18-Nov-15 573.04 8.1% 46.7 4.64 Fixed 3.59 235 Baa2 BBBH Rated
MPLT 2015-LD1 A Consumer LoanDepot MPLT Jefferies 13-Nov-15 88.28 18.0% 123.0 1.74 Fixed 4.00 381
MPLT 2015-LD1 B Consumer LoanDepot MPLT Jefferies 13-Nov-15 88.28 13.0% 7.5 1.74 Fixed 6.00 506
MPLT 2015-LD1 C Consumer LoanDepot MPLT Jefferies 13-Nov-15 88.28 8.0% 7.5 1.74 Fixed 8.00 706
INSKT 2015-3 A Consumer Prosper INSKT Insikt 4-Nov-15 42.00 n/a 32.0 n/a Fixed 4.50 439
INSKT 2015-3 B Consumer Prosper INSKT Insikt 4-Nov-15 42.00 n/a 9.1 n/a Fixed 9.50 947
CHAI 2015-PM2 A Consumer Prosper CHAI Citi 23-Oct-15 419.76 45.0% 230.9 0.77 Fixed 2.35 195 A3 Rated
CHAI 2015-PM2 B Consumer Prosper CHAI Citi 23-Oct-15 419.76 24.5% 86.1 2.19 Fixed 4.00 275 Baa3 Rated
CHAI 2015-PM2 C Consumer Prosper CHAI Citi 23-Oct-15 419.76 10.5% 58.8 2.97 Fixed 5.96 450 Ba3 Rated

 

Ticker Type Originator Shelf Issuer Issue Date Collat Amt Credit Amt ($mm) Initial WAL Coupon Initial Est. Moodys S&P DBRS   Fitch Kroll Rated
($mm) Support (%) (yrs) Type Coupon Pricing
MPLT 2015-AV2 A Consumer Avant MPLT Jefferies 16-Oct-15 111.01 30.6% 86.3 n/a Fixed 4.00 351
MPLT 2015-AV2 B Consumer Avant MPLT Jefferies 16-Oct-15 111.01 20.7% 12.3 n/a Fixed 5.75 510
MPLT 2015-AV2 C Consumer Avant MPLT Jefferies 16-Oct-15 111.01 10.7% 12.3 n/a Fixed 7.50 685
MPLT 2015-AV1 A Consumer Avant MPLT Jefferies 24-Sep-15 126.52 30.1% 88.5 1.08 Fixed 4.00 316
MPLT 2015-AV1 B Consumer Avant MPLT Jefferies 24-Sep-15 126.52 20.1% 12.6 1.69 Fixed 5.75 495
MPLT 2015-AV1 C Consumer Avant MPLT Jefferies 24-Sep-15 126.52 10.1% 12.6 1.69 Fixed 7.50 670
MPLT 2015-OD3 A SME OnDeck MPLT Jefferies 15-Sep-15 79.63 19.7% 67.7 0.54 Fixed 3.25 281
MPLT 2015-OD3 B SME OnDeck MPLT Jefferies 15-Sep-15 79.63 10.2% 8.0 1.28 Fixed 5.25 na
AVNT 2015-A A Consumer Avant AVNT Avant 12-Aug-15 140.00 26.5% 108.4 1.09 Fixed 4.00 342
AVNT 2015-A B Consumer Avant AVNT Avant 12-Aug-15 140.00 16.0% 15.5 1.69 Fixed 6.00 521
AVNT 2015-A C Consumer Avant AVNT Avant 12-Aug-15 140.00 5.5% 15.5 1.69 Fixed 7.75 721
MPLT 2015-OD2 A SME OnDeck MPLT Jefferies 12-Aug-15 73.06 15.5% 59.0 0.42 Fixed 3.25 289
MPLT 2015-OD2 B SME OnDeck MPLT Jefferies 12-Aug-15 73.06 5.5% 6.9 0.97 Fixed 5.25 na
CHAI 2015-PM1 A Consumer Prosper CHAI Citi 5-Aug-15 420.90 46.0% 227.3 0.71 Fixed 1.85 140 A3 Rated
CHAI 2015-PM1 B Consumer Prosper CHAI Citi 5-Aug-15 420.90 25.5% 86.3 2.08 Fixed 2.93 200 Baa3 Rated
CHAI 2015-PM1 C Consumer Prosper CHAI Citi 5-Aug-15 420.90 10.5% 63.1 3.25 Fixed 5.01 385 Ba3 Rated
SOFI 2015-C A1 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 4-Aug-15 447.56 30.5% 136.5 3.81 Floating 1.57 105 Aa2 AAA Rated
SOFI 2015-C A2 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 4-Aug-15 447.56 56.0% 250.8 3.67 Fixed 2.51 98 Aa2 AAA Rated
SOFI 2015-C B Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 4-Aug-15 447.56 6.8% 30.3 5.41 Fixed 3.58 184 Baa2 BBBH Rated
INSKT 2015-2 A Consumer Prosper INSKT Insikt 10-Jul-15 4.50 n/a 3.6 n/a Fixed 4.50 438
INSKT 2015-2 B Consumer Prosper INSKT Insikt 10-Jul-15 4.50 n/a 0.8 n/a Fixed 9.50 946
CBSLT 2015-A A1 Student CommonBond CBSLT CommonBond 24-Jun-15 105.00 91.8% 96.4 n/a Fixed 3.20 165 Baa2 AH Rated
SOFI 2015-B A1 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 9-Jun-15 441.18 33.2% 146.7 3.75 Floating 1.57 105 Aa3 A AAH Rated
SOFI 2015-B A2 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 9-Jun-15 441.18 53.4% 235.4 3.59 Fixed 2.51 105 Aa2 A AAH Rated
SOFI 2015-B B Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 9-Jun-15 441.18 6.8% 29.8 5.14 Fixed 3.52 165 Baa3 BBB Rated
MPLT 2015-OD1 A SME OnDeck MPLT Jefferies 4-Jun-15 52.08 15.0% 44.3 0.58 Fixed 3.25 266
MPLT 2015-OD1 B SME OnDeck MPLT Jefferies 4-Jun-15 52.08 5.0% 5.2 1.19 Fixed 5.25 na
MPLT 2015-CB1 A Consumer CircleBack MPLT Jefferies 3-Jun-15 110.06 22.0% 99.9 n/a Fixed 4.00 312
MPLT 2015-CB1 B Consumer CircleBack MPLT Jefferies 3-Jun-15 110.06 17.0% 6.3 n/a Fixed 6.00 511
ECLT 2014-1 A Consumer Lending Club ECLT Eaglewood 1-May-15 150.00 n/a 120.0 2.25 Fixed 3.50 260
ECLT 2014-1 B Consumer Lending Club ECLT Eaglewood 1-May-15 150.00 n/a 22.5 2.54 Fixed 5.33 429
INSKT 2015-1 A Consumer Prosper INSKT Insikt 31-Mar-15 4.31 n/a 3.7 n/a Fixed 4.00 396
BLT 2015-1 A Consumer Prosper BLT Blue Elephant 25-Mar-15 60.90 n/a 55.0 0.96 Fixed 3.12 275
BLT 2015-1 B Consumer Prosper BLT Blue Elephant 25-Mar-15 60.90 n/a 8.9 2.56 Fixed 5.56 475
BLT 2015-1 C Consumer Prosper BLT Blue Elephant 25-Mar-15 60.90 n/a 3.6 n/a Fixed 0.00 n/a
GLCT 2015-A A Consumer Prosper GLCT Garrison 2-Mar-15 190.26 n/a 154.1 1.52 Fixed 3.96 324
GLCT 2015-A B Consumer Prosper GLCT Garrison 2-Mar-15 190.26 n/a 9.4 1.52 Fixed 5.43 472
GLCT 2015-B A Consumer Prosper GLCT Garrison 2-Mar-15 120.58 n/a 97.4 1.52 Fixed 3.96 324
GLCT 2015-B B Consumer Prosper GLCT Garrison 2-Mar-15 120.58 n/a 5.9 1.52 Fixed 5.43 472
CCOLT 2015-1 A Consumer Prosper CCOLT BlackRock 9-Feb-15 306.71 23.5% 281.3 1.05 Fixed 2.82 240 Baa3 Rated
CCOLT 2015-1 B Consumer Prosper CCOLT BlackRock 9-Feb-15 306.71 11.0% 45.4 2.86 Fixed 5.21 395 Ba3 Rated
SOFI 2015-A A1 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 29-Jan-15 313.80 n/a 151.5 3.89 Floating 1.72 125 A2 A AA Rated
SOFI 2015-A A2 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 29-Jan-15 313.80 n/a 162.3 3.47 Fixed 2.42 125 A2 A AA Rated
GLCII 2014-A A Consumer Lending Club GLCII Garrison 29-Dec-14 153.00 n/a 109.8 1.35 Fixed 4.00 355
GLCII 2014-A B Consumer Lending Club GLCII Garrison 29-Dec-14 153.00 n/a 9.5 1.35 Fixed 6.00 555
INSKT 2014-2 A Consumer Prosper INSKT Insikt 22-Dec-14 7.50 n/a 7.1 n/a Fixed 4.00 396
INSKT 2014-2 B Consumer Prosper INSKT Insikt 22-Dec-14 7.50 n/a 0.6 n/a Fixed 9.00 895
SOFI 2014-B A1 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 10-Nov-14 303.20 n/a 105.7 3.89 Floating 1.77 125 A2 A AAL Rated
SOFI 2014-B A2 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 10-Nov-14 303.20 n/a 197.5 3.3 Fixed 2.55 130 A2 A AAL Rated
CANF 2014-1A A SME CAN Capital CANF CAN Capital 17-Oct-14 200.02 n/a 171.0 2.9 Fixed 3.12 210 A A Rated
CANF 2014-1A B SME CAN Capital CANF CAN Capital 17-Oct-14 200.02 n/a 20.0 3.4 Fixed 4.26 221 BBB- BBBL Rated
KABB 2014-1RT A22 SME Kabbage KABB Kabbage 25-Sep-14 n/a n/a 575.3 2.56 Floating 3.27 209 A- Rated
KABB 2014-1RT B2A SME Kabbage KABB Kabbage 25-Sep-14 n/a n/a 168.6 2.56 Floating 10.52 907 BB- Rated
KABB 2014-1RT B2B SME Kabbage KABB Kabbage 25-Sep-14 n/a n/a 0.0 2.56 Fixed 3.00 192 BB- Rated
KABB 2014-1RT B2C SME Kabbage KABB Kabbage 25-Sep-14 n/a n/a 21.1 2.56 Floating 13.52 1,234 B+ Rated
GARST 2014-A A Consumer Prosper GARST Garrison 18-Jul-14 45.54 n/a 36.9 1.52 Fixed 3.00 233
GARST 2014-A B Consumer Prosper GARST Garrison 18-Jul-14 45.54 n/a 2.3 1.52 Fixed 4.00 333
SOFI 2014-A A1 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 14-Jul-14 280.69 n/a 125.5 3.69 Floating 2.12 160 A A Rated
SOFI 2014-A A2 Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 14-Jul-14 280.69 n/a 125.5 3.72 Fixed 3.02 165 A A Rated

 

Ticker Type Originator Shelf Issuer Issue Date Collat Amt Credit Amt ($mm) Initial WAL Coupon Initial Est. Moodys   S&P DBRS   Fitch    Kroll Rated
($mm) Support (%) (yrs) Type Coupon Pricing
GLCT 2014-A A Consumer Prosper GLCT Garrison 2-Jul-14 169.21 n/a 147.6 1.53 Fixed 3.00 253
GLCT 2014-A B Consumer Prosper GLCT Garrison 2-Jul-14 169.21 n/a 9.0 1.53 Fixed 4.00 353
INSKT 2014-1 A Consumer Prosper INSKT Insikt 28-May-14 n/a n/a 7.1 n/a Fixed 3.50 345
ONDK 2014-1A A SME OnDeck ONDK OnDeck 8-May-14 183.20 n/a 156.7 2.32 Fixed 3.15 250 BBB Rated
ONDK 2014-1A B SME OnDeck ONDK OnDeck 8-May-14 183.20 n/a 18.3 2.8 Fixed 5.68 477 BB Rated
SOFI 2013-A A Student SoFi SOFI SoFi 23-Dec-13 151.80 n/a 151.8 4.35 Fixed 3.75 245 A Rated
INSKT 2013-2 A Consumer Prosper INSKT Insikt 17-Dec-13 n/a n/a 2.6 n/a Fixed 4.25 421
INSKT 2013-2 B Consumer Prosper INSKT Insikt 17-Dec-13 n/a n/a 0.6 n/a Fixed 11.00 1,096
INSKT 2013-1 A Consumer Prosper INSKT Insikt 4-Oct-13 1.57 n/a 1.1 n/a Fixed 4.50 444
INSKT 2013-1 B Consumer Prosper INSKT Insikt 4-Oct-13 1.57 n/a 0.3 n/a Fixed 12.00 1,197
ECLT 2013-1 A Consumer Lending Club ECLT Eaglewood 26-Sep-13 100.00 n/a 75.0 2.37 Fixed 4.30 371
ECLT 2013-1 B Consumer Lending Club ECLT Eaglewood 26-Sep-13 100.00 n/a 24.0 2.44 Fixed 8.00 739

About the author: PeerIQ offers portfolio monitoring and loan surveillance, structured finance analytics, third-party reporting, pricing and valuation and advisory services across both whole loans and ABS products.

Disclosures Section

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Thursday November 17 2016, Daily News Digest

average interest rate

News Comments Today’s main news: Zopa plans to start a digital-only bank. Renaud Laplanche kicks off a rival to Lending Club. Two Avant securitization break triggers. Today’s main analysis : Surge of online loan defaults. Today’s thought-provoking articles: Yirendai’s CFO Dennis Cong discusses P2P rules in China. Indonesian P2P companies seek regulatory clarity. Fundbox reveals volume of small […]

average interest rate

News Comments

United States

  • Fired Lending Club CEO starts another online lending company. GP:” I strongly believe that Renaud didn’t do anything really wrong and that he demonstrated his unbelievable accumen in building Lending Club. I would back him any day of the week to build a new company in the space. Yes, he did round some corners, but who has never made any mistakes ? And I think one learnes from past experiences. I am very bullish on Credify ” AT: “Anyone who didn’t see this coming is blind. There was no non-compete in place. What else would a pioneer of an industry do?”
  • A surge of online loan defaults rocks the industry. GP:” There are 2 extremes in the industry. On one side companies like SoFi who have outstanding performance and on the other side companies like Circle Back who demonstrated a track record of poor underwriting. Underwriting is the foundation of all online lenders and some understood it and some have not. I don’t think that online lending has any particular correlation with underwriting quality. However, because hundreds of new companies debuted in online lending, of course some of them will do a poor job at it.” AT: “Critics have been warning aboout a P2P bubble for quite a while now. Is this evidence of it? Or perhaps online lenders have simply taken too many risks and this is a self-correcting hurdle the industry must get through to move on to higher mountains. I favor the latter.”
  • Fundbox analysis shows $ 825 billion in small business unpaid invoices. AT: “There have been an untold number of small businesses tank due to cash flow issues caused by big businesses paying invoices late, slowly, or not at all. While interesting, and not really news to small business owners, this PR looks like an attempt at free publicity.”
  • U.S. consumers increasingly default on marketplace loans. GP: ” 2 Avant securitizations, done by Jefferies, and 1 done by Morgan Stanley, breached triggers. The 2 Jefferies ones did so this month. In addition, a CircleBack securitization done by Jefferies is expected to do so as well. The common points ? Loans made to sub-prime borrowers on average, and 3 out of 4 securitized by Jefferies.”
  • Jefferies files for second LC ABS. GP:” Jefferies securitizations have a poor reputation in general in p2p lending. However, Lending Club has all interest for this second securitization to go well. We think Lending Club has the expertise and means to do a good evaluation of what they are selling. In all cases, we are curious to see how this package will sell.”
  • Blockchain investment declines with few exceptions.
  • Baltimore-based eOriginal raises $ 26.5 million.

United Kingdom

China

India

Asia

United States

Fired LendingClub CEO Sets Up Rival Lender Nearby (The Wall Street Journal), Rated: AAA

A few blocks from the San Francisco headquarters of LendingClub Corp., its ousted chief executive is plotting a comeback to the industry he pioneered.

Renaud Laplanche has started a company called Credify Finance Corp. that will make loans via the internet just like LendingClub, according to corporate filings in several states.

Credify is still in the early stages of development. The company hopes to start extending credit to consumers in 2017, according to people familiar with the firm’s plans. It estimates it will generate $50 million in revenue next year, according to one state filing.

Credify was incorporated in Delaware on May 31, less than a month after Mr. Laplanche left LendingClub, according to state records. He didn’t sign a noncompete agreement with LendingClub that likely would have prevented him from starting a rival firm, according to people familiar with the matter.

Over the summer, Mr. Laplanche’s new company set up offices in a high-rise in San Francisco’s financial district and started the process of registering to do business in more than a dozen states, according to filings in those states.

Credify is being funded with Mr. Laplanche’s money and that of outside investors, people familiar with the matter said.

Surge In Online Loan Defaults Sends Shockwaves Through The Industry (Zero Hedge), Rated: AAA

Online lenders were supposed to revolutionize the consumer loan industry. Instead, they are rapidly becoming yet another “the next subprime.”

We first started writing about the P2P sector in early 2015 with cautionary pieces like and “Presenting The $77 Billion P2P Bubble” and “What Bubble? Wall Street To Turn P2P Loans Into CDOs.” Things accelerated in February of this yearwhen we first noted that substantial cracks were starting to show in the world of P2P lending, and more specifically, with LendingClub’s inability to assess credit risk of its borrowers that were causing the company to experience higher write-off rates than forecast.

Until today, that is, when we learned that – as expected – there has been a spike in online loan defaults by US consumers, sending a shockwave through the online lending industry: a group of online loans that were packaged into bonds is going bad faster than lenders and bond underwriters had expected even after the recent volatility in the P2P market, in what Bloomberg dubbed was “the latest sign that some startups that aimed to revolutionize the banking industry underestimated the risk they were taking.”


However, that was a linear deterioration which had no impact on mandatory cash covenants, at least not yet. With the breach of trigger points, online lenders have officially entered the world of binary outcomes, where the accumulation of enough bad loans will have implications on the underlying business and its use of cash.

And while P2P may be the “next” subrpime, there is always the “old” subprime to fall back on to get a sense of the true state of the US consumer :as Bloomberg adds, the percentage of subprime car loan borrowers that were past due reached a six-year high in August according to S&P Global Ratings’ analysis of debts bundled into bonds.

Fundbox Reveals How $ 825B In Unpaid Invoices Stagnates U.S. Small Businesses (PR Newswire), Rated: A

Fundbox, the leading cash flow optimization platform for small businesses (SMBs), today released findings from its customer data on invoice payments. The study, designed to better understand the overall financial health of SMBs, revealed the huge economic impact of unpaid invoices. Over the last 12 months, the total amount in unpaid invoices across all U.S. SMBs is approximately $825 billion.

Cash flow gaps from unpaid invoices are often cited as the most challenging hurdle for SMBs. Looking back at 12 months of data, Fundbox analysis found that 22 percent of invoices are unpaid at any given time. This equates to $84,000 per small business in unpaid invoices. In some cases they never receive payment.

U.S. Consumers Are Increasingly Defaulting on Loans Made Online (Bloomberg), Rated: A

Delinquencies and defaults are reaching key levels known as “triggers” for at least four different sets of bonds. Breaching those levels will force lenders or underwriters to start paying down the bonds early. Avant Inc. and its underwriters, for example, are going to have to begin to repay three of its asset-backed notes, according to a person with knowledge of the matter.

Online loans have shown other signs of weakening.

LendingClub’s founder, Renaud Laplanche, wanted to change banking as we know it, but many online lenders are now finding themselves in uncharted territory. Steve Eisman, a money manager who famously predicted the collapse of subprime mortgage securities, said some firms have been careless and that Silicon Valley is “clueless” about the work involved in making loans to consumers. Non-bank startups arranged more than $36 billion of loans in 2015, mainly for consumers, up from $11 billion the year before, according to a report from KPMG.

Lenders themselves are talking about the heavy competition for customers. Jay Levine, the chief executive officer of OneMain Holdings Inc., one of America’s largest subprime lenders, said last week that “the availability of unsecured credit is currently the greatest that has been in recent years,” although he said much of the most intense competition is coming from credit card lenders. OneMain, formerly part of Citigroup, is taking steps to curb potential losses by requiring the weakest borrowers to pledge collateral.

Jefferies arranges second Lending Club ABS (Global Capital), Rated: A

Jefferies filed deal documents with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on Tuesday for Lending Club Issuance Trust Series 2016-NP2. The transacation will be backed by near-prime unsecured consumer loans from Lending Club. Jefferies previously debuted a $105m unrated private offering from the same shelf in August.

Blockchain Capital Dries Up as Big FinTech Deals Decline (CoinDesk), Rated: B

Cash is drying up for bitcoin and blockchain startups amid a broader decline in FinTech funding, according to new research from KPMG and CB Insights.

The report, published today, shows that for the third straight quarter, VC investment in startups using distributed ledgers declined.

While enthusiasm for the technology remains, the report said that companies shouldn’t expect additional funds until countless proofs-of-concept emerge on the market.

But while venture capital for blockchain innovation is on the decline, different regions tell different stories.

The US and Denmark are listed as the top countries participating in blockchain investment, while a particularly slow quarter for Europe is blamed in part on uncertainly following Britain’s decision to leave the European Union.

An “uptick” in Asian investment in blockchain and financial technology more generally speaking is credited with the region’s interest in its potential to help it expand beyond its traditional borders.

Fintech company eOriginal raises $ 26.5 million (Technical.ly), Rated: B

A Baltimore fintech company closed a $26.5 million transaction of its own this week.

The equity round for eOriginal was led by Philadelphia-based private equity firm LLR Partners. eOriginal was founded in 1996, and has offices in the Camden Yards warehouse.

With the new funding eOriginal is looking to expand its digital transaction management offerings, which help companies execute businesses transactions with electronic signatures and document verification. The tools are used for marketplace lending, as well as vehicle and equipment banking.

United Kingdom

Peer-to-peer giant Zopa to launch digital bank (The Telegraph), Rated: AAA

Zopa, Britain’s biggest peer-to-peer website, has applied for a banking licence to launch a “next generation bank”, which will sit alongside its existing investments business.

When launched, the platform says it will offer term-deposit accounts for savers and revolving lines of credit for borrowers, although a spokesman admitted the company does not yet know “exactly what they will look like”.

By applying for a banking licence Zopa says its customers will receive protection through the Financial Services Compensation Scheme. However, it expects this will only apply to banking customers and not to its peer-to-peer customers.

It expects the licence approval to take up to two years.

A year of growth for online lending. October industry news (Funding Circle), Rated: AAA

Last month our team was the lead sponsor at LendIt, the largest conference dedicated to connecting the global online lending community. The conference, which took place over two days in London, had more than 900 attendees from across the world. Samir Desai, Funding Circle CEO and co-founder, delivered the keynote speech where he discussed the importance of being good at both the ‘fin’ and the ‘tech’. Watch the video to learn about the three ‘mega-trends’ that make online lending an unstoppable force and read this piece to hear why Samir believes our sector is about to enter a ‘golden age’.

Another way for investors to diversify their online lending portfolio is to look at the various investment trusts that are now in this space. These funds allow investors to diversify either across regions or platforms. Learn more about the opportunities and risks involved with these investments in This is Money. Remember, when you lend, your capital is at risk.

Where is the most profitable area in the UK for buy-to-let landlords? (Home.co.uk), Rated: A

According to Lendinvest’s latest buy-to-let index, Luton in Bedfordshire is currently the most profitable area in the UK for buy-to-let landlords, with rental prices increasing by almost 10%, the largest increase in the country.

On an annual basis landlords in Luton generated a 4.81% yield, while home prices rose by 13.63% and experienced rental price growth of 9.58%.

The top 10 buy-to-let postcodes

Yield Capital gains Rental price growth Transaction volume growth
Luton 4.81% 13.63% 9.58% -4.71%
Stevenage 4.31% 14.78% 8.95% -9.81%
Enfield 4.76% 17.36% 2.21% -4.35%
Northampton 4.87% 8.11% 8.33% 4.38%
Dartford 4.78% 13.02% 7.98% -10.22%
Southend-on-Sea 4.56% 11.79% 5.95% -4.63%
Romford 5.26% 13.47% 2.48% -1.55%
Chelmsford 4.26% 12.15% 5.29% -3.96%
Southall 4.88% 14.01% 3.97% -10.36%
Twickenham 4.48% 15.49% 2.34% -9.16%

OFF3R launches index for AIM (Every Investor), Rated: A

OFF3R analysed major equity crowdfunding platforms including Seedrs, Crowdcube, Syndicate Room, Angels Den, Envestors and The House Crowd. The P2P lending platforms examined were Zopa, Landbay, RateSetter, ArchOver, Marketinvoice, Lending Works, Funding Circle and Thin Cats.

The Index shows that equity crowdfunding raised a combined total of £216.25m and P2P facilitated a combined lending of £2.6bn.

The Index shows that the average amount lent per month was £197m across the eight platforms. April 2016 showed a 7% drop due to a number of factors, such as Lord Turner’s negative comments about the P2P market and Lending Club’s loan book discrepancies.

China

Yirendai’s Cong: China’s P2P Rules a Great Step Forward (Bloomberg), Rated: AAA

P2P Industry Struggles to Conform to New Restrictions (Caixin Online), Rated: A

Three months after Beijing imposed strict rules on the peer-to-peer (P2P) lending industry, many firms have made little progress in meeting some of the key requirements.

One major problem they have is ensuring borrowers don’t exceed newly imposed credit limits, industry experts said. Another is that many P2P firms haven’t met the new requirement to find a bank to be the custodian of the funds they get from their client investors, who are essentially the lenders.

Among the many restrictions the policy introduced was a ceiling on how much a person can borrow through P2P platforms. The limit for each individual through one website was set at 200,000 yuan ($29,200). A person cannot borrow more than a combined 1 million yuan from P2P lenders regardless of how many platforms they use.

The policy gave all P2P firms until the end of August 2017 to ensure compliance.

Even with the grace period, however, about 90% of the existing platforms will likely have to shut down, primarily because of the loan-size requirement, said Xu Jianwen, founder and CEO of rrjc.com. Xu’s P2P lending website is ranked by industry data provider wdzj.com as among the country’s top 50 such sites.

India

SRS Fin Tech launches alternative lending platform OxyLoans (Business Standard), Rated: AAA

City-based financial technology startup SRS Fin Tech Labs today announced the launch of ‘OxyLoans’, an alternative lending platform, and said it aimed to disburse USD 1 billion by 2024.

Armed with proprietary algorithms showcasing credit score, underwriting and agreement preparation, OxyLoans enables investors and lenders to assess borrowers and offer them the option of accepting or rejecting an application, he said, adding that it also provides business as usual loans in partnership with banks.

Asia

Indonesian P2P industry seeks regulatory clarity (Nikkei Asian Review), Rated: AAA

Peer-to-peer (P2P) online lending is surging in Indonesia, prompting regulators to prioritize the establishment of a legal framework to protect the industry — a move that participants say is essential to fulfil its potential.

The market is growing rapidly, driven in part by the 65% of the population of 250 million that is excluded from the banking system. The value of online transactions will reach $14.8 billion in 2016 from $8 billion in 2013, according to Bank Indonesia, and is expected to grow to $130 billion by 2020.

The Financial Services Authority, known by its Indonesian initials OJK, has made financial technology regulation a priority, and is focusing on the payment services industry, which is seen as the sector with the highest growth potential.

The OJK has said that security and consumer protection are its main concerns, given Indonesia’s history of fraud in various business sectors. It has also taken heed of a large P2P scandal in China, in which Ezubao, one of China’s highest profile P2P lending sites, cheated more than 900,000 investors of $7.6 billion.

While the OJK’s move has been viewed positively by the market, there are still concerns that the regulator lacks sufficient financial technology knowledge to be able to establish an effective legal framework. Some P2P companies have described the agency as inexperienced in financial technology matters, urging it to involve the industry in discussions about regulations and laws.

Indonesia also lacks a secondary market in which P2P lenders and investors can offload risk to secondary buyers, which is regarded as crucial for P2P businesses in profitable but risky emerging markets.

Authors:

George Popescu
Allen Taylor

Monday September 26th 2016, Daily News Digest

Monday September 26th 2016, Daily News Digest

News Comments Main news: Jefferies-Loan Depot securitization breaks trigger; Lending Club’s fund 1st down-month; Funding Circle’s results; GLI’s results; Lufax signs banks for IPO. Main analysis: PeerIQ’s summary of last 9 months. Main thought provoking: The causes and effects of low rates, a must read Economist article; China’s number of p2p lenders will keep growing […]

Monday September 26th 2016, Daily News Digest

News Comments

United States

United Kingdom

Canada

Australia

China

 

United States

Internet Lender’s Bond Deal Starts to Sour a Year After Sale, (Bloomberg), Rated: AAA

Comment: I am not an expert in securitization, nor in investment banking. But it looks to me that Jefferies’ made securitization have by far the highest probability of breaking triggers. This is very strange. See Circle Back and OnDeck’s. And now LoanDepot’s. 

Online consumer loans made by LoanDepot Inc. are going bad faster than underwriters expected, threatening payments to investors who bought bonds backed by those debts less than a year ago.

Cumulative losses rose to 4.97 percent in September, breaching the 4.9 percent “trigger” in the $140 million securitization that Jefferies Group assembled last November and sold to investors that now include the Catholic Order of Foresters, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Bondholders in the riskiest portion of the deal who may see funds diverted couldn’t be identified because the offering is private.

LoanDepot, which for years has specialized in traditional mortgage banking, began making small consumer loans over the internet last year.

Jefferies has been a lead underwriter of other securitizations backed by loans made by online startups, and at least two of its deals, for CircleBack Lending Inc. and OnDeck Capital Inc., have also breached their triggers. Those include Marketplace Loan Trust 2015-CircleBack 1 and Marketplace Loan Trust 2015-OnDeck 3.

CircleBack Lending hired Jefferies to explore a sale, people familiar said in June, as funding for online-finance companies tightened amid concern about loan performance.

LoanDepot aborted a planned initial public offering last November and turned to other sources of funds, including a $150 million term debt financing completed in August. The company says it recorded 80 percent year-over-year average annual growth from its founding in 2010 to 2015, funding more than $70 billion of loans. Second-quarter fundings reached almost $10 billion in home, personal and home equity loans, the company said.

“Mark-to-market” from Q1’s ABS West to Q3 ABS East, (Peer IQ email), Rated: AAA

This past February, at ABS West, conversations centered on deteriorating collateral performance and liquidity concerns. A steady flow of negative headlines–Madden-Midland, negative ratings actions, San Bernadino, platform layoffs, and global slowdown concerns–weighed heavily on investor sentiment.

Two events marked the peak of investor apprehension:
In the bond market, the pricing of CHAI 2016-PM1 (PeerIQ analysis here) where Mezzanine bonds delivered greater returns than the whole loans themselves.
In the equity market, investor capitulation after the Lending Club May 9th disclosures.

Turning of the Tide

Global credit markets began to firm in April. Lending Club tightened DTI criteria, elevated the role of the capital markets function, and strengthened leadership on the board and executive team.

In May, the US Treasury report published “Opportunities and Challenges in Marketplace Lending”–a constructive regulatory development. Treasury acknowledged the role of securitization in funding growth, and consistent with the PeerIQ RFI, recommended the need for standardized reps & warranties, consistent reporting standards for loan origination data, loan securitization transparency, and consistent market-driven valuation standards.

SoFi achieved a AAA rating for an MPL bond and cracked open the MPL ABS investor market to global investors via its hands-on marketing approach.

PeerIQ observed that secondary ABS spreads continued to tighten despite volatility in the equity markets. PeerIQ also observed in the Q2 tracker that the combination of stricter underwriting, higher coupons, and tighter secondary ABS spreads meant the conditions for securitization were strong.

In June, SoFi brought to market its first rated

LendingClub Fund Has First Negative Month on Valuation Overhaul, (Bloomberg), Rated: AAA

A LendingClub Corp. investment fund that’s struggled with withdrawals this year posted a negative return for August, the first decline in its five-year history, after overhauling how it values holdings and incurring losses on riskier debts.

The fund, overseeing about $700 million at the start of the month, had disclosed plans earlier in the summer to overhaul how it tracks assets. It enlisted outside valuation firm Duff & Phelps Corp. and shifted methodology to forecast how debts will perform individually, rather than in groups. August marked the first month under the new system, resulting in a one-time 0.95 percent reduction to returns, Sanborn wrote.

The LC Advisors Broad-Based Consumer Credit Fund ended the month down 0.49 percent, cutting this year’s net return to 1.24 percent, LendingClub Chief Executive Officer Scott Sanborn told stakeholders in a letter and report Friday.

In June, the investment vehicle was forced to limit redemptions after stakeholders asked to pull out $442 million, or 58 percent of assets under management.

But in the case of the August slump, key developments had already been signaled, with the largest hit coming from a one-time adjustment as the firm improved how it values holdings, Sanborn wrote in the letter.

In the future, “investors should expect more movement in fund returns month-over-month because the new methodology is more responsive to changes in each individual loan’s delinquency status,” he said.

Global P2P (Peer-to-peer) Lending Market Analysis 2016 Forecasts to 2021, (News Maker), Rated: A

Comment: this article is promoting a report.

The analysts forecast the global P2P lending market to grow at a CAGR of 53.06% during the period 2016-2020. To calculate the market size, Technavio considers the lending amount through P2P platforms in the Americas, Asia Pacific (APAC), and Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (EMEA).

Low pressure, (The Economist), Rated: AAA

Interest rates are persistently low. First we ask who or what is to blame. Then we look at one outcome: a looming pensions crisis.

On September 21st the Federal Reserve kept its target for overnight interest rates at 0.25-0.5% but indicated that, after raising the target for the first time in a decade last year, it hoped to raise it for a second time soon—possibly in December, after America’s presidential elections.

Earlier that day, the Bank of Japan (BoJ) said it was staying with its target of raising inflation to 2%. Indeed it went further. The bank said it would continue to buy bonds at a rate of around ¥80 trillion ($800 billion) a year, until inflation gets above 2% and stays there for a while. To help meet this “inflation-overshooting commitment”, the bank said ten-year-bond yields would remain at around zero.

The debt-laden are delighted with the persistence of a low-rate world. It costs much less to service their obligations. But savers are increasingly grumpy. Economists are simply baffled. In the 1980s and 1990s, the high real cost of borrowing (ie, after adjusting for inflation) was the puzzle. Today’s interest-rate mystery is more troubling and there is division over the reasons for it.

One side says it is simply the consequence of the policies pursued by the rich world’s central banks. The Fed, ECB, BoJ and Bank of England have kept overnight interest rates close to zero for much of the past decade. In addition, they have purchased vast quantities of government bonds with the express aim of driving down long-term interest rates.

It is hardly a mystery, on this view: central banks have rigged the money markets.

On the other side of the divide are those who argue that central banks are merely responding to underlying forces. In this view the real interest rate is decided by the balance of supply and demand for the pool of global savings. The fall in interest rates since the 1980s reflects a shift in this balance: the supply of savings has increased as demand for it has crashed.

This ongoing glut in savings is due to two factors in particular. The first is changing demography, mostly in the rich world but also in some emerging markets. Populations are aging. At the same time, the average working life has not changed much. So more money has to be squirreled away to pay for a longer retirement (see article).

A second, related, factor is the integration of China into the world economy. “A billion people with a 40% savings rate; that brings a lot more supply to the table,”

Aging is not the only long-run influence that has tilted the savings-investment scales. By skewing income to the high-saving rich, an increase in income inequality within countries has added to the saving glut. A fall in the relative price of capital goods means fewer savings are needed for a given level of investment. Both trends predate the fall in real interest rates, however, which suggests they did not play as significant a role as demography or China.

A related reason for more saving is fear. The severity of the Great Recession belied the relative economic stability that preceded it.

Consider the business of life-inssurance companies. They pledge to pay a stream of cash to policyholders, often for decades. This promise can be likened to issuing a bond. Insurance firms need to back up these promises. To do so they buy safe assets, such as government bonds.

The trouble is that the maturities on these bonds are shorter than the promises the insurers have made. In the jargon, there is a “duration mismatch”.

When bond yields fall, say because of central-bank purchases, the cost of the promises made by insurance companies goes up. The prices of their assets go up as well, but the liability side of the scales is generally weightier (see chart 4). And it gets heavier as interest rates fall. That creates a perverse effect. As bond prices rise (and yields fall), it increases the thirst for bonds. Low rates beget low rates.

If a growing bulge of middle-aged workers is behind the secular decline in real interest rates, then the downward pressure ought to attenuate as those workers move into retirement. Japan is further along this road than other rich countries. Yet its long-term real interest rates are firmly negative.

A concern is that as more people retire, and save less, there will be fewer buyers for government bonds, of which less than 10% are held outside Japan. Another of the Geneva Report’s authors, Takatoshi Ito of Columbia University, reckons there will be a sharp rise in Japanese bond yields within the next decade. There may be political pressure on the Bank of Japan to keep buying bonds to prevent this.

Swedish FinTech Klarna Partners with SAP on Whirlwind Three-Month Business Overhaul, (PR Newswire), Rated: A

SAP announced today that Klarna, has become the first customer to go live with smart accounting for financial instruments (smart AFI), a new functionality based on the SAP® Bank Analyzer set of applications, 9.0 release. In just three months SAP implemented the solution including accounting rules configuration, data integration and a full setup of the SAP HANA® database environment, proving that up-leveling market and product growth does not have to be a long and arduous process.

 

United Kingdom

Global expansion almost doubles losses at fintech unicorn and peer-to-peer lender Funding Circle, (City A.M.), Rated: AAA

The peer-to-peer lending group is set to post a full-year loss of £36m when it publishes its accounts on Tuesday, after expanding into Europe and the US ate into profits. However, revenues at the firm, which was founded in 2010 and has lent more than £1.5bn to small and mid-sized businesses, rose 140 per cent from £13m to £32m last year.

“We expect our UK business to be profitable in the fourth quarter of 2016 and to generate significant cashflow in 2017 to finance international operations” said chief executive Samir Desai.

In 2015 the company raised $150m (£116m) of new equity for the business and listed the first and only single platform investment trust – the £150m Funding Circle SME Income Fund – on the London Stock Exchange.

GLI Finance Limited Unaudited Interim Results for the six month period ended 30 June 2016, (Email), Rated: AAA

Full report can be found here.

Highlights

  • The Company losses for the period were GBP6.9m (June 2015 profit of GBP5.3m), impacted by GBP13m write downs in investments in underperforming or liquidated platforms following the strategic review;
  • Group organized with Three Pillars to improve operational focus and assist reporting our strategy;

Pillar One

  • Sancus BMS Group on a pro forma* like for like basis, increased consolidated revenues from GBP2.7 million in H1 2015 to GBP4.0 million in H1 2016. The period was notable for the consolidation of the Sancus group and its amalgamation with BMS and Platform Black to establish our specialty lending business.

Pillar Two

  • Valuations in our prioritized platforms, The Credit Junction, LiftForward, Funding Options and Finexkap increased by GBP5.5m in aggregate. Investments in underperforming or liquidated platforms were written down by GBP13m. We have been very prudent in reorganizing this portfolio and we fully expect to see value of this portfolio build materially in future periods;

Pillar Three

  • Amberton Asset Management remains de minimus and we expect to make progress on this pillar in the next 12-18 months;

Group

  • As a consequence of the considerable restructuring in the period together with writedowns in Pillar Two, the Net Loss for the period on the GLI Measurement Basis** was GBP10.3m (H1 2015: Net Profit of GBP0.2m).
  • As a consequence of making early write-downs and recognizing losses in underperforming assets, together with raising capital and reorganizing Sancus BMS Group, the Companies’ balance sheet is significantly strengthened. Nonetheless, during the period the Company Net Asset Value “NAV” per share decreased from 42.73p to 37.07p;
  • Company debt to gross asset ratio is 30% (31 December 2015 33%)
  • Company Net Assets have increased in the period from GBP98.2m to GBP105.6m and;
  • The Company’s weighted-average cost of debt decreased from 8.6% (year to 31 December 2015) to 6.8% (period to 30 June 2016).

Post period end

  • Ordinary share placing raised GBP7.1m from Somerston Group in August 2016;
  • New wholly owned subsidiary, FinTech Ventures Limited (“FVL”), created to hold, initially, the four Prioritised FinTech platforms thereby enabling independent capital raises to support these investments.
  • Name change of GLI Alternative Finance Limited Plc to the SME Loan Fund (“SMEF”) on 1 September 2016.

Zoopla partners with Landbay for P2P lending solution, (Financial Reporter), Rated: B

The new channel on the Zoopla website includes a peer-to-peer lending solution, in partnership with Landbay, where anyone can invest from as little as £100 into buy-to-let mortgages, statistically the lowest risk form of peer-to-peer lending.

Canada

Financeit expands management team by tapping CFO from Capital One Canada, (Morningstart), Rated: A

This addition to Financeit’s management team will help propel the Toronto-based company into its next stage of maturity as it continues to expand its market share in the point-of-sale financing industry.

With 20 years’ experience managing and leading finance teams in Canada and the United Kingdom, Hanning served as Capital One Canada’s Chief Financial Officer for nearly five years. Prior to becoming CFO, Hanning held various senior positions within the bank’s Canadian and United Kingdom operations over the previous 12 years. He started his career at Glenfield Hospital NHS Trust in Leicester, United Kingdom.

Hanning’s entry into Financeit comes on the heels of the company’s $339 million acquisition of TD Bank Group’s indirect home improvement financing assets in partnership with Concentra.

Australia

Beyond Bank Australia and SocietyOne announce key partnership, (PR Wire), Rated: A

Beyond Bank Australia is continuing its expansion into the fintech sector, forming a significant partnership with the nation’s leader in marketplace lending, SocietyOne.

The agreement sees Beyond Bank tip in $1.5 million for an equity stake in SocietyOne as well as increasing its existing funding commitment in personal loans to $10 million. The arrangement was formalised on Friday, September 23.

SocietyOne now has ten mutual banks and credit unions among its 200 investor funders and is actively engaged with a number of other potential investors as it undergoes further expansion, targeting a 2-3 percent share of the $100 billion consumer finance market by 2021.

China

P2P lender Lufax taps four banks for Hong KongIPO, (China Daily), Rated: AAA

CITIC Securities, Citigroup, JPMorgan and Morgan Stanley have started preparatory work,although no formal mandate has been awarded, the people said.

The volume of Chinese P2P loans stood at 680.3 billion yuan ($102 billion) at the end ofAugust, more than 20 times levels seen in January 2014, according to industry data providerWangdaizhijia.

One third of China’s 3,000 peer-to-peer lending platforms ‘problematic’: new report, (SCMP), Rated: A

The 2016 Blue Book of Internet Finance, published on Friday, found 1,263 of the P2P platforms on the mainland up to the end of 2015 were problematic, which included cases of fraud or firms going out of business.

This total included 896 P2P platforms that got into problems in 2015, with more than half involved in fraudulent tricks that took advantage of loopholes in regulations, the report said.

“China’s slow economic growth has led to plunging business for small and medium-size companies; It increases the risk of loan defaults,” the report said, adding that the risk of financing usually rose after accumulating over a long period.

In one typical case of fraud, highlighted in the report, one P2P platform, Rong Zuan Dai, went online in November 2015 and published 37 financing projects that promised high interest rates to hundreds of investors. But after two weeks the website suddenly closed.

Of the current total, Guangdong province had the largest concentration of P2P platforms, with 18 per cent of the national total, the report said.

It estimates that the number of P2P platforms nationwide will continue to rise at a rate of 90 per cent over both of the next two years as the industry further consolidates, and could eventually reach 10,000.

The number of active users of P2P is also expected to surpass nine million in 2016.

Author:

George Popescu

August 8th 2016, Daily News Digest

August 8th 2016, Daily News Digest

News Comments Today’s news pour some cold water on P2P SME lending : SME securitizations and SME yield performance seem to be less than expected. See 1st article in US section and 1st article in UK section. Finova raised $52.5 mil , Mosaic $220 mil. And today’s the day : Lending Club and OnDeck release […]

August 8th 2016, Daily News Digest

News Comments

United States

United Kingdom

Australia

News Summary

United States

Funding Circle, and other online lenders, falter in America, (Financial Times), Rated: AAA

“Our portfolio of Funding Circle US loans has continued to substantially underperform our expectations, a trend which continued during the quarter and created a drag on the overall portfolio. We stopped purchasing new Funding Circle US loans late in 2015 so the portfolio continues to amortize down.” [ Comment: see the complete VPC Q2 2016 letter in the UK section below].

That’s from VPC Specialty Lending (VSL) Investments’ second quarter letter, released earlier this week (mea culpa, we didn’t spot it at first).

VSL’s disclosure forced Funding Circle’s listed fund to issue its own filing to the market yesterday, sort of but not outright rejecting the suggestion that loans were underperforming:

The Company’s US Credit Assets are projected to return in excess of 8% per annum on a net unlevered basis – consistent with historic performance observed on the Funding Circle US marketplace.

But that might be downplaying the historic performance a little. When Funding Circle floated its fund last year, this is the US loan performance it revealed in its November prospectus (note the numbers didn’t include expected future losses and showed the to-date performance at that time):

Sachin Patel, Funding Circle’s global co-head of capital markets, said that loans originated in the first half of 2015 had underperformed and are expected to return 7.25 per cent to its large, accredited investors, rather than the 8 per cent or more that it targets.

Funding Circle launched in the US in late 2013 and is run out of San Francisco by Sam Hodges. According to the 2015 prospectus for Funding Circle’s fund, US loans originated in early 2014 also “experienced higher than expected annualised loss rates”.

Similar missteps were seen in Funding Circle’s first years of operation in the UK too:

But Funding Circle isn’t the only online lender to small businesses in the US that is disappointing investors. According to a Morgan Stanley note last month, a second securitisation of loans originated by OnDeck, which is listed, breached its loss trigger in June:

MPLT 2015-OD3 from OnDeck breached triggers in June, joining the 3 deals we had previously highlighted – MPLT 2015- CB1 (Circleback), MPLT 2015-OD1 (OnDeck) and GLCII 2014-A (Lending Club).

That makes four online lending securitisation deals that have hit their loss trigger, meaning that cashflows are diverted to senior bondholders at the expense of the lower tranche investors. Three of those four deals, as far as we can tell, were arranged by Jefferies.

It’s also worth keeping an eye on securitisations of loans from Avant, a US consumer lender that also gets a dishonourable mention in VSL’s letter (note that Victory Park is an equity investor in Avant):

We also saw a reduction in the value of three residual interests in securitizations of Avant loans that are held at fair market value. These markdowns, which flow through capital, reflect loss curves coming in slightly higher than in the first quarter. While the capital markets have recently begun to re-open for marketplace lending loans, we have no current plans to pursue additional securitizations.

FTC Announces FinTech Forum on Crowdfunding, Peer-to-Peer Payments, (JD Supra Business Advisor), Rated: AAA

The FTC announced it will be hosting the next event in the FinTech Forum series on October 26, 2016.

BNY Mellon sees possible rise of P2P collateral lending, (Global Custodian), Rated: A

Peer-to-peer lending among buy-siders could emerge due to a challenging regulatory environment for sourcing and optimising collateral, according to BNY Mellon.

In the report, BNY Mellon states that institutional investors may also find further opportunities in a peer-to-peer relationship, where buy-side firms are both the collateral provider and receiver.

The report can be found here.

 Income: any Fintech to fill-in the supply shortage?, ( Daily Fintech), Rated: AAA

The world still needs current [Comment: I believe most people use the word fixed instead of current] income for a variety of reasons: wage stagnation, tax overburdening, and the usual cash flows needs that are not at all well managed.

Source: Pension Partners

Challenger banks in the UK have been offering bonds (3yrs or less) to entice customers to sign up on their platforms.

Source: Daily Finance

There are two Alternative finance options that can generate income, much like high yield bonds or publicly traded REITS have been doing in normal conditions.

Investors in the UK can invest in the LE listed

Finova Financial Raises $ 52.5 M First Round For Car Equity Loans, (Wall Street Journal), Rated: A

Finova Financial has raised $52.5 million in its first institutional funding—much of it in the form of debt—for its consumer lending service that provides car owners with a line of credit.

The funding was led by MHS Capital, with participation from Refactor Capital; CoVenture; Metamorphic Ventures; 500 Startups; Funding Circle co-founder Sam Hodges; NerdWallet co-founder Jake Gibson; and Al Hamra Group, a company owned by a ruling family in the United Arab Emirates.

A “large percentage” of the round was the credit facility, the company said, but declined to give specifics.

Founded in January 2015, Finova provides loans in exchange for liens on consumers’ cars, which the company calls a “car-equity line of credit,” which resembles a home equity credit line. Its loans are typically $1,500 to $1,700.

Finova charges about 70% less than the industry average, according to Mr. Keough said.

In contrast to typical paper applications, with Finova people can apply on a website or mobile device by providing information about their cars and driver’s licenses and receive decisions quickly, Mr. Keough said. About 65% of customers apply via phones.

The car equity loan is Finova’s first product, and the company intends to launch other products for “unbanked” consumers, as the company describes its target market.

“My investment thesis is: financial services for the rest of us,” said Sheel Mohnot, the partner at 500 Startups who leads the firm’s fintech investments. “There could not be a better fit (than Finova) for working with a population who is unbanked.”

Warburg Pincus Leads $ 220 Million Round for Solar Lender Mosaic, ( Wall Street Journal), Rated : A

Private-equity firm Warburg Pincus is leading a $220 million equity investment in energy-financing startup Solar Mosaic Inc., according to two people familiar with the situation. The company, known as Mosaic, provides loans for solar installations for homeowners. It is starting to finance other energy-efficiency upgrades that are meant to reduce utility bills.

Warburg Pincus will have a slight majority control of Mosaic through its $200 million investment, one person said. Other investors in the round include financial technology venture firm Core Innovation Capital and Obvious Ventures, a firm, co-founded by Ev Williams, that seeks to invest in startups that offer a positive social impact. Andrew Beebe, managing director at Obvious Ventures, has had a long career in solar energy.

Mosaic has said that it plans to originate about $1 billion in residential-solar loans in the coming 12 months. It secured $200 million in credit from DZ Bank as the lead lender earlier this year. NY Green Bank also participated.

The company’s business model is built around allowing people to own their own solar systems. That contrasts against the predominant model of financing residential solar under lease programs in which homeowners rent the solar power their properties generate.

Privately held GreenSky LLC and Spruce Finance Inc., backed by Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, also operate in the category. Earlier Mosaic investors include Spring Ventures, Serious Change, Blue Haven Initiative and Bronze Investments.

Colorado Inquiry Prompts Avant to Rejig Bonds, Kroll Says, (PeerIQ), Rated: AAA

Avant Inc., the online lending marketplace, removed unsecured consumer loans made to Colorado residents from a securitization deal after a state regulator sought information about its lending policies, according to Kroll Bond Rating Agency. Colorado concluded that loans mad to its residents must comply with its lending statutes, even if the debts originate through partner banks in another state, as Avant does in Utah, Kroll said in an Aug. 2 report. Such statutes include usury laws and restrictions on late fees and other charges, Kroll said in its evaluation of an upcoming $200 million securitization to be sold by Avant. “In light of the letters from the Colorado regulator, Avant has removed all loans made to Colorado residents,” Kroll said. Carolyn Blackman Gasbarra, a spokeswoman for Chicago-based Avant, declined via e-mail to comment while the deal is pending. Kroll said Avant is “proactively addressing any regulator concerns.” Sheila Bair, the former head of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and a frequent proponent of tougher regulation, was added to the company’s board earlier this year.

Inside CommonBond’s 401(k) platform for student loan debt, (Tradestreaming), Rated: AAA

In July 2016, student loan platform CommonBond acquired online loan repayment advisor Gradible. The acquisition of Gradible, which uses an algorithm to recommend what the best repayment options are for student loan borrowers, has enabled CommonBond to roll out a new platform that it’s calling the 401(k) for student loans.

The 401(k) platform will enable employers to contribute to their employees student loans just as they contribute to their employees’ retirement. “What the acquisition of Gradible allows us to do is to marry up certain technologies that they’ve built with technologies that we’ve already built to accelerate the platform,” said David Klein, co-founder and CEO of CommonBond.

Gradible’s merger with CommonBond was two years in the works. A personal connection lead CommonBond to partner with the software company, becoming one of the refinance options Gradible offered on its platform. Eventually, CommonBond’s desire to expand its reach together with Gradible’s intention to accelerate its vision led to the merger.

Klein believes that bringing Gradible in-house will enable CommonBond to reach and meaningfully impact every one of the over 40 million Americans saddled with student debt, and to a certain extent this is true. As a student loan reassessment tool, Gradible can help students discover alternative ways to manage their debt, such as income-based repayment and public service loan forgiveness.

But the 401(k) will ultimately serve the “top talent”, who are the most likely to make it out of student debt in the first place.

CommonBond had one company ask it to implement the platform for them, and Klein has also piloted the 401(k) at CommonBond itself – much to its employees’ delight.

While the CommonBond-Gradible marriage can’t fix what’s broken with the student loan industry at large, its 401(k) product is opening up the traditional closed lender-borrower relationship to employers. So far, this threesome has benefited the entire loan ecosystem: lenders are getting repaid faster, employees are happier, and employers are meaningfully participating in their employees’ financial lives.

Online Lenders Have a Tough Job Ahead, (Wall Street Journal), Rated: AAA

LendingClub Corp. and OnDeck Capital Inc. have suffered through growing pains this year.

They each report second-quarter results Monday [Comment: today].

Jefferies closes Lending Club bonds sale, (Financial Times), Rated: A

Comment: our readers are familiar with this information from last week’s Monday Lending Times. I believe a reminder is a good idea though.

Jefferies has closed a private sale of bonds backed by personal loans originated by Lending Club, marking a step in the rehabilitation of the scandal-hit online lender ahead of its second-quarter earnings. Meanwhile, the Jefferies-led deal is “very positive” for the online-lending industry, said James Gutierrez, chief executive of Insikt, a platform that has sold bundles of Lending Club and Prosper loans to wealthy individuals.

Three months on, Jefferies has sold $105m of bonds backed by Lending Club loans, offering yields of 3.75 to 6.5 per cent.

Offers of unsecured personal loans sent out in the mail dropped 19 per cent in the second quarter from the first quarter, to 507m, according to Mintel Comperemedia, a market intelligence agency. All told, the industry has sent out 4.44bn loan offers to consumers over the past two years, peaking at 749m in the fourth quarter last year.

Goldman Sachs, which had been preparing a securitisation of prime loans from Lending Club before the scandal blew up in May, is prepared to bide its time, according to a person briefed on the bank’s plans.

MPOWER Brings on SoFi and Student-Lending Veteran Renee Suryan as Director of University Relations, (PR Web), Rated: A

Comment: Please see the Lending Times article on MPOWER here.

MPOWER Financing is pleased to formally announce the addition of Renee Suryan to its team. With more than 20 years of experience in student lending, including 10 years as a financial aid administrator, she joins MPOWER as Director of University Relations. Currently growing at a rate of 40 percent month-over-month in loan volume, MPOWER projects it will have more than 200 school partnerships and 21 state licenses by the end of 2016.

MPOWER Partners with FUTR to Support Domestic and International Student Loans, (PR Web), Rated: B

MPOWER Financing today announced that it is partnering with FUTR Corporation to provide superior loan servicing and support to MPOWER borrowers.

FUTR is a privately held and venture-backed higher education finance provider headquartered in San Francisco, with an operational hub in Bryan, Texas. FUTR is focused on bringing together modern technology and quality service to provide new levels of transparency and insight that borrowers need to optimally manage their financial future.

The Time To Start Thinking About Repaying Student Loans Is When You Take Them Out, (Forbes), Rated: B

Comment: article written for borrowers. Probably not useful to our readers.

Credible.com is a multi-lender student loan marketplace. One issue that’s underappreciated is that the time to start thinking about repaying your student loans is not when you graduate, but when you take them out.

The 27 fintech unicorns from around the world, ranked by value, (Business Insider), Rated: AAA

Comment: Article would have deserved to be in an international section. However it is only marginally relevant to our readers and we prefer not focus our newsletter on this article. Hence we located it at the end of our US section.

An interesting list. Many of our own industry participants are present. However I had not heard of a few of them. Worth a read.

United Kingdom

VPC Specialty Lending Investments PLC, (VPC Specialty Lending), Rated: AAA

Comment: There is a disclaimer the readers must read and agree to before accessing this article.

In the second quarter of 2016, VPC Speciality Lending Investments PLC (“VSL” or the “Company”) delivered a net return of 0.33%. Although the return wasbelow expectations, it does not reflect what we believe will be the level of long-term returns for our shareholders given our existing portfolio and pipeline. There are several reasons for the decline in short-term performance, which are outlined below along with the steps we are taking to mitigate these factors in the near term.

The decision by U.K. voters to leave the European Union (“EU”) and the subsequent depreciation of the GBP had a negative impact on the Company’s performance as we had to maintain an outsized cash balance related to our currency hedge. Leading up to the EU Referendum, we took a conservative approach to our cash management and credit allocations. A substantial portion of our assets are held in USD and other currencies, which are hedged to GBP via forward currency swaps. The hedging program was put in place when the investments were made following the Company’s March 2015 IPO and September 2015 C share offering. Since then, due to the substantial depreciation of GBP against USD, the Company has had to deposit in cash up to 11.5% of the Company’s NAV. While the direct effect of the currency swings on our income has been limited because our non-GBP exposure is largely hedged, the obligation to settle the hedges upon expiration and the need to maintain additional liquidity in the event the GBP depreciates further has limited our ability to be largely fully invested, as we strive to be. The outlook for the GBP continues to be uncertain – several economists have set target prices for USD/GBP at $1.20 or below with a one-year time horizon – leaving us to remain conservative. We are reviewing all available options to reduce the cash drag related to the margin requirement, including a revolving credit facility for the Company.

The majority of our whole loan portfolio performed in line with our expectations, although certain positions did experience higher than expected losses.

Accordingly, we believe we are now in the period of peak losses for our portfolios (assuming static economic conditions), leading to muted NAV returns in the near term but we expect the returns to even out over the life of the investments.

As previously announced, our portfolio of Funding Circle US loans has continued to substantially underperform our expectations, a trend which continued during the quarter and created a drag on the overall portfolio. We stopped purchasing new Funding Circle US loans late in 2015 so the portfolio continues to amortize down.

We also saw a reduction in the value of three residual interests in securitizations of Avant loans that are held at fair market value.

On a more positive note, our balance sheet loan portfolio continued to show excellent performance with no impairments and coupons ranging from 12% to 16%.

  • On 26 May 2016, the Company made initial investments in West Creek Financial, Inc., a provider of point-of-sale lease-to-own financing to underserved customers enabling purchases of durable goods such as furniture, mattresses, and appliances.
  • On 30 June 2016, the Company made initial investments in Fundbox Ltd., a provider of short-term working capital advances to small and medium-sized businesses in the U.S. and the Company funded a new tranche of senior secured debt to Elevate Credit, Inc. Elevate is a provider of cash advances and installment loans to U.S. consumers.

While cash drag as a result of the currency hedge and the performance of certain whole loan investments were disappointing, we are encouraged by the performance of our existing balance sheet investments as well as the attractive terms of newer deals. In order to further demonstrate our commitment to the Company and our confidence in achieving returns of 8% or greater, we have agreed with the Company’s Board of Directors to modify our management agreement such that we will apply 20% of our monthly management fee to purchase shares of the Company at the prevailing market price on an ongoing basis, whilst the shares are trading at a discount to net asset value.

Understanding of risk remains a central issue for P2P industry, (Alt Fi), Rated: A

Andrew Tyrie, Chairman of the Treasury Select Committee, has written to the outgoing and incoming heads of the FCA – Tracey McDermott and Andrew Bailey respectively.

“Government policies to promote the crowdfunding sector may have the right intention – to increase competition in the small to medium enterprise lending market – but government tax incentives, in effect government subsidies, may be encouraging some consumers into the use of inappropriate products.”

The problem of a perceived lack of understanding of risk by investing consumers has been a common sector theme of late.

Analysis from AltFi Data illustrates that, to date, the lending performance of the largest UK platforms has delivered consistently positive net returns. Zopa, Funding Circle, Ratesetter and MarketInvoice together make up over 65% of the sector’s origination volume and lead the way when it comes to disclosure of their lending track record. 10 years of data representing that track record demonstrates that net returns have remained positive in a range of 5-6.5%. Bad debt performance has also been impressive, coming in at 5% for the worst ever annual cohort i.e. less than 1.7% annualized, and at no worse than 1.66%, i.e. less than 0.55% annualized, over the past 5 years.

Liberum Alt Fi Index. Source: AltFi.com

Assetz Capital Reports: Peer-to-Peer Lending Expected to Thrive As Bank of England Slashes Interest Rates, (Crowdfunding Insider), Rated: A

On Thursday, Assetz Capital one of the UK’s largest peer-to-peer lenders, announced it is predicting that both savers and borrowers will continue to turn to alternative finance companies in increasing numbers as Bank of England slashes interest rates from 0.5% to 0.25%.

Assetz Capital revealed, since launching in 2013, around £130 million has flown through its platform to credit-worthy borrowers, earning investors a total gross interest of more than £12 million to date and this lending is predicted to continue to rise rapidly.

Assetz Capital also predicted the number of business borrowers will also rise as a result of the cut interest rate.

Australia

Fintech B2B small business lending marketplace Bigstone raises million, (Financial Review), Rated: A

Fintech start-up Bigstone has raised $3 million from a range of investors, including ASX-listed diversified investments and venture capital firm CVC, to grow its small business lending marketplace and offer an alternative to the big banks.

Other major investors in the round were the founders of Bangkok-based fund Lighthouse Venture Partners Paniti Junhasavasdikul and Narith Phadungchai, in addition to private investors.

By the end of the year, Bigstone is hoping to have financed $10 million worth of loans to more than 200 small businesses.

A University of Sydney and KPMG study released earlier this year found that Australia’s online alternative finance market grew by 320 per cent in 2015 to $460 million, making it the third largest market in the Asia Pacific behind China and Japan.

Author:

George Popescu

August 8th 2016, Daily News Digest

August 8th 2016, Daily News Digest

News Comments Today’s news pour some cold water on P2P SME lending : SME securitizations and SME yield performance seem to be less than expected. See 1st article in US section and 1st article in UK section. Finova raised $52.5 mil , Mosaic $220 mil. And today’s the day : Lending Club and OnDeck release […]

August 8th 2016, Daily News Digest

News Comments

United States

United Kingdom

Australia

News Summary

United States

Funding Circle, and other online lenders, falter in America, (Financial Times), Rated: AAA

“Our portfolio of Funding Circle US loans has continued to substantially underperform our expectations, a trend which continued during the quarter and created a drag on the overall portfolio. We stopped purchasing new Funding Circle US loans late in 2015 so the portfolio continues to amortize down.” [ Comment: see the complete VPC Q2 2016 letter in the UK section below].

That’s from VPC Specialty Lending (VSL) Investments’ second quarter letter, released earlier this week (mea culpa, we didn’t spot it at first).

VSL’s disclosure forced Funding Circle’s listed fund to issue its own filing to the market yesterday, sort of but not outright rejecting the suggestion that loans were underperforming:

The Company’s US Credit Assets are projected to return in excess of 8% per annum on a net unlevered basis – consistent with historic performance observed on the Funding Circle US marketplace.

But that might be downplaying the historic performance a little. When Funding Circle floated its fund last year, this is the US loan performance it revealed in its November prospectus (note the numbers didn’t include expected future losses and showed the to-date performance at that time):

Sachin Patel, Funding Circle’s global co-head of capital markets, said that loans originated in the first half of 2015 had underperformed and are expected to return 7.25 per cent to its large, accredited investors, rather than the 8 per cent or more that it targets.

Funding Circle launched in the US in late 2013 and is run out of San Francisco by Sam Hodges. According to the 2015 prospectus for Funding Circle’s fund, US loans originated in early 2014 also “experienced higher than expected annualised loss rates”.

Similar missteps were seen in Funding Circle’s first years of operation in the UK too:

But Funding Circle isn’t the only online lender to small businesses in the US that is disappointing investors. According to a Morgan Stanley note last month, a second securitisation of loans originated by OnDeck, which is listed, breached its loss trigger in June:

MPLT 2015-OD3 from OnDeck breached triggers in June, joining the 3 deals we had previously highlighted – MPLT 2015- CB1 (Circleback), MPLT 2015-OD1 (OnDeck) and GLCII 2014-A (Lending Club).

That makes four online lending securitisation deals that have hit their loss trigger, meaning that cashflows are diverted to senior bondholders at the expense of the lower tranche investors. Three of those four deals, as far as we can tell, were arranged by Jefferies.

It’s also worth keeping an eye on securitisations of loans from Avant, a US consumer lender that also gets a dishonourable mention in VSL’s letter (note that Victory Park is an equity investor in Avant):

We also saw a reduction in the value of three residual interests in securitizations of Avant loans that are held at fair market value. These markdowns, which flow through capital, reflect loss curves coming in slightly higher than in the first quarter. While the capital markets have recently begun to re-open for marketplace lending loans, we have no current plans to pursue additional securitizations.

FTC Announces FinTech Forum on Crowdfunding, Peer-to-Peer Payments, (JD Supra Business Advisor), Rated: AAA

The FTC announced it will be hosting the next event in the FinTech Forum series on October 26, 2016.

BNY Mellon sees possible rise of P2P collateral lending, (Global Custodian), Rated: A

Peer-to-peer lending among buy-siders could emerge due to a challenging regulatory environment for sourcing and optimising collateral, according to BNY Mellon.

In the report, BNY Mellon states that institutional investors may also find further opportunities in a peer-to-peer relationship, where buy-side firms are both the collateral provider and receiver.

The report can be found here.

 Income: any Fintech to fill-in the supply shortage?, ( Daily Fintech), Rated: AAA

The world still needs current [Comment: I believe most people use the word fixed instead of current] income for a variety of reasons: wage stagnation, tax overburdening, and the usual cash flows needs that are not at all well managed.

Source: Pension Partners

Challenger banks in the UK have been offering bonds (3yrs or less) to entice customers to sign up on their platforms.

Source: Daily Finance

There are two Alternative finance options that can generate income, much like high yield bonds or publicly traded REITS have been doing in normal conditions.

Investors in the UK can invest in the LE listed

Finova Financial Raises $ 52.5 M First Round For Car Equity Loans, (Wall Street Journal), Rated: A

Finova Financial has raised $52.5 million in its first institutional funding—much of it in the form of debt—for its consumer lending service that provides car owners with a line of credit.

The funding was led by MHS Capital, with participation from Refactor Capital; CoVenture; Metamorphic Ventures; 500 Startups; Funding Circle co-founder Sam Hodges; NerdWallet co-founder Jake Gibson; and Al Hamra Group, a company owned by a ruling family in the United Arab Emirates.

A “large percentage” of the round was the credit facility, the company said, but declined to give specifics.

Founded in January 2015, Finova provides loans in exchange for liens on consumers’ cars, which the company calls a “car-equity line of credit,” which resembles a home equity credit line. Its loans are typically $1,500 to $1,700.

Finova charges about 70% less than the industry average, according to Mr. Keough said.

In contrast to typical paper applications, with Finova people can apply on a website or mobile device by providing information about their cars and driver’s licenses and receive decisions quickly, Mr. Keough said. About 65% of customers apply via phones.

The car equity loan is Finova’s first product, and the company intends to launch other products for “unbanked” consumers, as the company describes its target market.

“My investment thesis is: financial services for the rest of us,” said Sheel Mohnot, the partner at 500 Startups who leads the firm’s fintech investments. “There could not be a better fit (than Finova) for working with a population who is unbanked.”

Warburg Pincus Leads $ 220 Million Round for Solar Lender Mosaic, ( Wall Street Journal), Rated : A

Private-equity firm Warburg Pincus is leading a $220 million equity investment in energy-financing startup Solar Mosaic Inc., according to two people familiar with the situation. The company, known as Mosaic, provides loans for solar installations for homeowners. It is starting to finance other energy-efficiency upgrades that are meant to reduce utility bills.

Warburg Pincus will have a slight majority control of Mosaic through its $200 million investment, one person said. Other investors in the round include financial technology venture firm Core Innovation Capital and Obvious Ventures, a firm, co-founded by Ev Williams, that seeks to invest in startups that offer a positive social impact. Andrew Beebe, managing director at Obvious Ventures, has had a long career in solar energy.

Mosaic has said that it plans to originate about $1 billion in residential-solar loans in the coming 12 months. It secured $200 million in credit from DZ Bank as the lead lender earlier this year. NY Green Bank also participated.

The company’s business model is built around allowing people to own their own solar systems. That contrasts against the predominant model of financing residential solar under lease programs in which homeowners rent the solar power their properties generate.

Privately held GreenSky LLC and Spruce Finance Inc., backed by Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, also operate in the category. Earlier Mosaic investors include Spring Ventures, Serious Change, Blue Haven Initiative and Bronze Investments.

Colorado Inquiry Prompts Avant to Rejig Bonds, Kroll Says, (PeerIQ), Rated: AAA

Avant Inc., the online lending marketplace, removed unsecured consumer loans made to Colorado residents from a securitization deal after a state regulator sought information about its lending policies, according to Kroll Bond Rating Agency. Colorado concluded that loans mad to its residents must comply with its lending statutes, even if the debts originate through partner banks in another state, as Avant does in Utah, Kroll said in an Aug. 2 report. Such statutes include usury laws and restrictions on late fees and other charges, Kroll said in its evaluation of an upcoming $200 million securitization to be sold by Avant. “In light of the letters from the Colorado regulator, Avant has removed all loans made to Colorado residents,” Kroll said. Carolyn Blackman Gasbarra, a spokeswoman for Chicago-based Avant, declined via e-mail to comment while the deal is pending. Kroll said Avant is “proactively addressing any regulator concerns.” Sheila Bair, the former head of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and a frequent proponent of tougher regulation, was added to the company’s board earlier this year.

Inside CommonBond’s 401(k) platform for student loan debt, (Tradestreaming), Rated: AAA

In July 2016, student loan platform CommonBond acquired online loan repayment advisor Gradible. The acquisition of Gradible, which uses an algorithm to recommend what the best repayment options are for student loan borrowers, has enabled CommonBond to roll out a new platform that it’s calling the 401(k) for student loans.

The 401(k) platform will enable employers to contribute to their employees student loans just as they contribute to their employees’ retirement. “What the acquisition of Gradible allows us to do is to marry up certain technologies that they’ve built with technologies that we’ve already built to accelerate the platform,” said David Klein, co-founder and CEO of CommonBond.

Gradible’s merger with CommonBond was two years in the works. A personal connection lead CommonBond to partner with the software company, becoming one of the refinance options Gradible offered on its platform. Eventually, CommonBond’s desire to expand its reach together with Gradible’s intention to accelerate its vision led to the merger.

Klein believes that bringing Gradible in-house will enable CommonBond to reach and meaningfully impact every one of the over 40 million Americans saddled with student debt, and to a certain extent this is true. As a student loan reassessment tool, Gradible can help students discover alternative ways to manage their debt, such as income-based repayment and public service loan forgiveness.

But the 401(k) will ultimately serve the “top talent”, who are the most likely to make it out of student debt in the first place.

CommonBond had one company ask it to implement the platform for them, and Klein has also piloted the 401(k) at CommonBond itself – much to its employees’ delight.

While the CommonBond-Gradible marriage can’t fix what’s broken with the student loan industry at large, its 401(k) product is opening up the traditional closed lender-borrower relationship to employers. So far, this threesome has benefited the entire loan ecosystem: lenders are getting repaid faster, employees are happier, and employers are meaningfully participating in their employees’ financial lives.

Online Lenders Have a Tough Job Ahead, (Wall Street Journal), Rated: AAA

LendingClub Corp. and OnDeck Capital Inc. have suffered through growing pains this year.

They each report second-quarter results Monday [Comment: today].

Jefferies closes Lending Club bonds sale, (Financial Times), Rated: A

Comment: our readers are familiar with this information from last week’s Monday Lending Times. I believe a reminder is a good idea though.

Jefferies has closed a private sale of bonds backed by personal loans originated by Lending Club, marking a step in the rehabilitation of the scandal-hit online lender ahead of its second-quarter earnings. Meanwhile, the Jefferies-led deal is “very positive” for the online-lending industry, said James Gutierrez, chief executive of Insikt, a platform that has sold bundles of Lending Club and Prosper loans to wealthy individuals.

Three months on, Jefferies has sold $105m of bonds backed by Lending Club loans, offering yields of 3.75 to 6.5 per cent.

Offers of unsecured personal loans sent out in the mail dropped 19 per cent in the second quarter from the first quarter, to 507m, according to Mintel Comperemedia, a market intelligence agency. All told, the industry has sent out 4.44bn loan offers to consumers over the past two years, peaking at 749m in the fourth quarter last year.

Goldman Sachs, which had been preparing a securitisation of prime loans from Lending Club before the scandal blew up in May, is prepared to bide its time, according to a person briefed on the bank’s plans.

MPOWER Brings on SoFi and Student-Lending Veteran Renee Suryan as Director of University Relations, (PR Web), Rated: A

Comment: Please see the Lending Times article on MPOWER here.

MPOWER Financing is pleased to formally announce the addition of Renee Suryan to its team. With more than 20 years of experience in student lending, including 10 years as a financial aid administrator, she joins MPOWER as Director of University Relations. Currently growing at a rate of 40 percent month-over-month in loan volume, MPOWER projects it will have more than 200 school partnerships and 21 state licenses by the end of 2016.

MPOWER Partners with FUTR to Support Domestic and International Student Loans, (PR Web), Rated: B

MPOWER Financing today announced that it is partnering with FUTR Corporation to provide superior loan servicing and support to MPOWER borrowers.

FUTR is a privately held and venture-backed higher education finance provider headquartered in San Francisco, with an operational hub in Bryan, Texas. FUTR is focused on bringing together modern technology and quality service to provide new levels of transparency and insight that borrowers need to optimally manage their financial future.

The Time To Start Thinking About Repaying Student Loans Is When You Take Them Out, (Forbes), Rated: B

Comment: article written for borrowers. Probably not useful to our readers.

Credible.com is a multi-lender student loan marketplace. One issue that’s underappreciated is that the time to start thinking about repaying your student loans is not when you graduate, but when you take them out.

The 27 fintech unicorns from around the world, ranked by value, (Business Insider), Rated: AAA

Comment: Article would have deserved to be in an international section. However it is only marginally relevant to our readers and we prefer not focus our newsletter on this article. Hence we located it at the end of our US section.

An interesting list. Many of our own industry participants are present. However I had not heard of a few of them. Worth a read.

United Kingdom

VPC Specialty Lending Investments PLC, (VPC Specialty Lending), Rated: AAA

Comment: There is a disclaimer the readers must read and agree to before accessing this article.

In the second quarter of 2016, VPC Speciality Lending Investments PLC (“VSL” or the “Company”) delivered a net return of 0.33%. Although the return wasbelow expectations, it does not reflect what we believe will be the level of long-term returns for our shareholders given our existing portfolio and pipeline. There are several reasons for the decline in short-term performance, which are outlined below along with the steps we are taking to mitigate these factors in the near term.

The decision by U.K. voters to leave the European Union (“EU”) and the subsequent depreciation of the GBP had a negative impact on the Company’s performance as we had to maintain an outsized cash balance related to our currency hedge. Leading up to the EU Referendum, we took a conservative approach to our cash management and credit allocations. A substantial portion of our assets are held in USD and other currencies, which are hedged to GBP via forward currency swaps. The hedging program was put in place when the investments were made following the Company’s March 2015 IPO and September 2015 C share offering. Since then, due to the substantial depreciation of GBP against USD, the Company has had to deposit in cash up to 11.5% of the Company’s NAV. While the direct effect of the currency swings on our income has been limited because our non-GBP exposure is largely hedged, the obligation to settle the hedges upon expiration and the need to maintain additional liquidity in the event the GBP depreciates further has limited our ability to be largely fully invested, as we strive to be. The outlook for the GBP continues to be uncertain – several economists have set target prices for USD/GBP at $1.20 or below with a one-year time horizon – leaving us to remain conservative. We are reviewing all available options to reduce the cash drag related to the margin requirement, including a revolving credit facility for the Company.

The majority of our whole loan portfolio performed in line with our expectations, although certain positions did experience higher than expected losses.

Accordingly, we believe we are now in the period of peak losses for our portfolios (assuming static economic conditions), leading to muted NAV returns in the near term but we expect the returns to even out over the life of the investments.

As previously announced, our portfolio of Funding Circle US loans has continued to substantially underperform our expectations, a trend which continued during the quarter and created a drag on the overall portfolio. We stopped purchasing new Funding Circle US loans late in 2015 so the portfolio continues to amortize down.

We also saw a reduction in the value of three residual interests in securitizations of Avant loans that are held at fair market value.

On a more positive note, our balance sheet loan portfolio continued to show excellent performance with no impairments and coupons ranging from 12% to 16%.

  • On 26 May 2016, the Company made initial investments in West Creek Financial, Inc., a provider of point-of-sale lease-to-own financing to underserved customers enabling purchases of durable goods such as furniture, mattresses, and appliances.
  • On 30 June 2016, the Company made initial investments in Fundbox Ltd., a provider of short-term working capital advances to small and medium-sized businesses in the U.S. and the Company funded a new tranche of senior secured debt to Elevate Credit, Inc. Elevate is a provider of cash advances and installment loans to U.S. consumers.

While cash drag as a result of the currency hedge and the performance of certain whole loan investments were disappointing, we are encouraged by the performance of our existing balance sheet investments as well as the attractive terms of newer deals. In order to further demonstrate our commitment to the Company and our confidence in achieving returns of 8% or greater, we have agreed with the Company’s Board of Directors to modify our management agreement such that we will apply 20% of our monthly management fee to purchase shares of the Company at the prevailing market price on an ongoing basis, whilst the shares are trading at a discount to net asset value.

Understanding of risk remains a central issue for P2P industry, (Alt Fi), Rated: A

Andrew Tyrie, Chairman of the Treasury Select Committee, has written to the outgoing and incoming heads of the FCA – Tracey McDermott and Andrew Bailey respectively.

“Government policies to promote the crowdfunding sector may have the right intention – to increase competition in the small to medium enterprise lending market – but government tax incentives, in effect government subsidies, may be encouraging some consumers into the use of inappropriate products.”

The problem of a perceived lack of understanding of risk by investing consumers has been a common sector theme of late.

Analysis from AltFi Data illustrates that, to date, the lending performance of the largest UK platforms has delivered consistently positive net returns. Zopa, Funding Circle, Ratesetter and MarketInvoice together make up over 65% of the sector’s origination volume and lead the way when it comes to disclosure of their lending track record. 10 years of data representing that track record demonstrates that net returns have remained positive in a range of 5-6.5%. Bad debt performance has also been impressive, coming in at 5% for the worst ever annual cohort i.e. less than 1.7% annualized, and at no worse than 1.66%, i.e. less than 0.55% annualized, over the past 5 years.

Liberum Alt Fi Index. Source: AltFi.com

Assetz Capital Reports: Peer-to-Peer Lending Expected to Thrive As Bank of England Slashes Interest Rates, (Crowdfunding Insider), Rated: A

On Thursday, Assetz Capital one of the UK’s largest peer-to-peer lenders, announced it is predicting that both savers and borrowers will continue to turn to alternative finance companies in increasing numbers as Bank of England slashes interest rates from 0.5% to 0.25%.

Assetz Capital revealed, since launching in 2013, around £130 million has flown through its platform to credit-worthy borrowers, earning investors a total gross interest of more than £12 million to date and this lending is predicted to continue to rise rapidly.

Assetz Capital also predicted the number of business borrowers will also rise as a result of the cut interest rate.

Australia

Fintech B2B small business lending marketplace Bigstone raises million, (Financial Review), Rated: A

Fintech start-up Bigstone has raised $3 million from a range of investors, including ASX-listed diversified investments and venture capital firm CVC, to grow its small business lending marketplace and offer an alternative to the big banks.

Other major investors in the round were the founders of Bangkok-based fund Lighthouse Venture Partners Paniti Junhasavasdikul and Narith Phadungchai, in addition to private investors.

By the end of the year, Bigstone is hoping to have financed $10 million worth of loans to more than 200 small businesses.

A University of Sydney and KPMG study released earlier this year found that Australia’s online alternative finance market grew by 320 per cent in 2015 to $460 million, making it the third largest market in the Asia Pacific behind China and Japan.

Author:

George Popescu

August 1st 2016, Daily News Digest

August 1st 2016, Daily News Digest

News Comments Today’s big news is Lending Club’s 1st securitization. We have a long article from PeerIQ on the subject. Very interesting. To be noted that the analysis is made of bits and pieces, very few of which can be found in the public domain. We wish there was more transparency. In the international section […]

August 1st 2016, Daily News Digest

News Comments

  • Today’s big news is Lending Club’s 1st securitization. We have a long article from PeerIQ on the subject. Very interesting. To be noted that the analysis is made of bits and pieces, very few of which can be found in the public domain. We wish there was more transparency.
  • In the international section I recommend reading the article about Chinese private banks. A very interesting new trend I was not aware of and which could impact the Chinese economy significantly.

United States

United Kingdom

Mexico

  • The rise of Mexican FinTech. I believe Mexican entrepreneurs are extremely inventive and the Mexican financial market is very different from the US. It is a very interesting market and US companies have no issues finding good talent to cover the Mexican market. I certainly understand why the Mexican fintech market is heating up. Worth a read.

China

 

United States

Lending Club’s first securitization, (PeerIQ), Rated: AAA

This week marks the first securitization of LendingClub near-prime loans. The deal is riding the wake of successful issuance and spread compression as evidenced from SoFi and Marlette. It also marks the appearance of a LendingClub branded shelf—LendingClub Issuance Trust (LCIT), suggesting a broader trend of tapping into the ABS markets and a pattern of repeat issuance among MPL originators.

LCIT 2016-NP1 was not rated (bucking a trend of 10 consecutive rated MPL deals), and thus, raises the diligence requirements for institutional investors. Here, we construct the foregoing analysis with publicly available data.

LCIT 2016-NP1 is sponsored by Jefferies and backed by about $135 million of LendingClub (LC) near-prime loans. Reports indicate that the average credit score of the collateral pool is about 640. The deal collateral has a weighted-average coupon of 28.5%.

The loans in LCIT 2016-NP1 are originated under the LendingClub Near Prime Custom Program. The Custom Program consists of loans that do not satisfy the Standard Program credit policy and are only available to qualified institutional investors. According to LC’s Q1 2016 SEC filing, the Custom Program represents 24% of total origination from LendingClub. The Near-Prime (NP) loans have lower average balance and shorter duration than loans in the Standard Program. We show in Exhibit 1 the differences amongst Super-Prime, Prime, and Near-Prime programs.
Exhibit 1 – Comparing LendingClub Super-Prime, Prime, and Near-Prime Loans
How does LCIT 2016-NP1 compare to other MPL ABS executed this year?  Neither SoFi nor Prosper deals are a good comparable to LCIT due to their higher average income and credit scores of the collateral pools.  Investors may be tempted to compare LCIT 2016-NP1 with OneMain deals (OMFIT) as LCIT 2016-NP1 has an average credit score of 640.  OneMain has securitized ~$7.3 billion of subprime unsecured consumer loans since 2014. OneMain Financial, affiliated with Springleaf Financial, has over 1,000 physical branches and lends to customers with credit scores between 600 to 650. OneMain is not a marketplace lender according to the definition in our Securitization Tracker.
Given the characteristics of LendingClub NP loans, we suggest that the collateral LCIT 2016-NP1 may be closer to AVNT 2016-B than other personal loan ABS deals. AVNT 2016-B is backed by loans with an average credit score of 660 and has 18.75%-21.00% base case cumulative loss assumption from by Kroll.
Structural Protection
In the case of LCIT 2016-NP1, the A-tranche has 35.5% credit enhancement, the B-tranche has a 23.0% hard OC (Exhibit 2). Moreover, given the short WAL of 0.75 years, the A-tranche holder should expect credit enhancement to improve significantly beyond 35.5% level a year from today. The accelerated deleveraging on A-tranche provides significant credit loss protection for the bondholder. B-tranche holder benefits from excess spread as well as over-collateralization.
Exhibit 2 compares the structure of various deals and it is easy to see the differences in LCIT 2016-NP1 as compared to OMFIT 2016-3.
Exhibit 2 Comparing Capital Structure
Favorable Pricing Indications
As of last Friday, pricing indication was favorable as compared to guidance. On July 27th, Bloomberg reported the initial pricing guidance for A-tranche at 4% and B-tranche at 7%.  By the 29th, the pricing indication was 25 basis points tighter for A-tranche and 50 basis points tighter for B-tranche (Exhibit 2).
The 6.5% coupon on the B-tranche is comparable to the loss-adjusted return of owning Standard Program whole loans. Furthermore, under Basel III risk-weighted asset requirements, unrated securitizations are subject to supervisory formula approach. Dealer financing desks may have difficulty in providing leverage to unrated tranches in LCIT 2016-NP1.
Collateral Performance
We attempt to analyze the prepayment and default speeds for the NP loans in the Custom Program.  Since data on the performance of Custom Program loans is not publicly available, we analyze the 36-month F-grade cohort of the Standard Program as a proxy. LendingClub’s Standard Program originates loans in grades ranging from “A” to “G” in order of increased credit risk.  Exhibit 3 shows that 36-month F-grade loans have lower average credit scores (680) and higher average loan coupons (24%).  The coupon rate on the F-grade loans is double the average LendingClub coupon rate.
Exhibit 3 – LendingClub F-Grade Loans in Standard Program
Exhibit 4 compares the 1-month Conditional Prepayment Rate (CPR) for LendingClub borrowers to the Standard Program across loan grades. Riskier credits run almost similar prepayments as compared to the average loan pool in the initial life of the loan. Rapid prepayments early in the pool will pay the A-tranche down very quickly, which has 0.75 year expected WAL. Prepayments reduce as F-grade loans season, and the CPR curve runs below that of A- and B- grade loans.
Exhibit 4 1-Month Conditional Prepayment Rate (CPR) of LendingClub Loans in Standard Program
In Exhibit 5 we show the 1-month Conditional Default Rate (CDR) for all LC borrowers, F-grade, and A- and B-grade loans in the Standard Program. The CDR of F-grade loans tends to ramp up quickly in the early part of loan life or Month-on-Balance (MOB) peaking at ~25%. Since the F-grade loan borrowers are paying an average interest rate of 24%, the weaker credits exit the pool through charge-off in the early part of loan life, leaving strong credit borrowers in the pool. The CDR fully ramps up around MOB 8 and levels off between MOB 9 to 22. In the last year of the loan life, the default rate decreases, reflecting credit burn-out behavior for the F-grade loan borrowers. We expect to see similar behavior in the LCIT 2016-NP1 pool.
Investors should expect a high default rate in early years of the deal. We expect the cumulative losses for 36-month LCIT 2016-NP1 loans will be approximately low to mid-twenties given the mild seasoning and shorter collateral WAL.
Exhibit 5 1-Month Conditional Default Rate (CDR) of LendingClub Loans in Standard Program
We note that the transparency we observe in the whole loan market disappears for private or Rule 144A securitization transactions. In analyzing LCIT 2016-NP1, we have relied on sparse information from news media and on our own expertise and analytics to interpret and synthesize the available information.  We believe that transparency reduces informational asymmetries, promotes price discovery, and improves liquidity.
PeerIQ, along with SFIG [Comment : And along with Lending Times], supports self-regulatory efforts to improve loan transparency and standardization on ABS deals in order to encourage the smooth functioning of the ABS markets.

Kroll Opts Out of Lending Club Gig, (Peer IQ Newsletter), Rated: AAA

Kroll has backed out of an assignement to rate a long-delayed securitization of Lending Club personal loans. While there is no official word on the reasons for Kroll’s withdrawal, one source said it might have wanted more credit enhancement than the issuer wa willing to supply. Bloomerg peggged the enhancement at 35.5%, ahtough it’s unclear what form the cushion takes.

In any case, the move created something of a buzz among industry professionals, who are used to seeing Kroll’s grades on such transactions.

The offering is tthe first from a shelf entity called Lending Club Issuance Trust. It’s unclear if Jefferies bought the underlying loans and is acting as the issuer, as would be typical for a marketplace-loan deal, or if Lending Club itself is pulling the collateral from its own portofolio.

Online Lending: High-Yield Investing for a Low-Yield World, (Orchard Platform), Rated: AAA

In the graphs below, we see the yield on U.S. treasury notes of various duration since 1990, as well as a close-up on yields since the beginning of 2016.  As we can see, we are in the midst of a prolonged low-rate environment, and the events of the past 2 weeks have caused yields to fall even lower.

Providers of online consumer loans, LendingClub and Prosper, rates range from a low of above 5% to a high of over 30%, rank-ordering by the risk of the borrower as measured by the originator-assigned credit ratings.

If loans perform as expected, there is ample spread between expected interest income and expected loss.

The Orchard US Consumer Online Lending Index measures the aggregate investor-experienced return of loans originated by major online lenders in the U.S.  The index aims to track the cash-on-cash returns that would be experienced by an investor buying a dollar-weighted slice of all outstanding loans.  As we can see in the graph below, the Orchard Index exhibits solid performance over a multi-year period.  Particularly when compared to traditionally-popular equity and fixed-income indexes, online consumer loans stand out for their ability to achieve solid returns with relatively low volatility.

Investments in online lenders fall 44 percent, (Daily Times), Rated: AAA

Equity investments into online lending companies is down about 44 percent, to $2.1 billion from $3.8 billion, for the first half of the year compared to the back half of last year, according to a report out Friday from PitchBook Data Inc, a venture capital database that tracks deals and valuations.

PE Firm’s Rules: Invest in Experience, Be Wary of Online Lenders, (American Banker), Rated: AAA

In evaluating investment opportunities in fintech, the private equity firm GTCR, where Roche is a managing director, has largely steered clear of marketplace lenders because most, he said, have yet to prove themselves.

The firm is also a big believer in experience, so GTCR will only invest in companies that have competent management with proven track records. For instance, last month GTCR announced it was pairing with Scott Happ, a veteran in the mortgage technology industry, to buy Optimal Blue Holdings, a cloud-based product and pricing engine provider that processes nearly a quarter of the mortgages originated in the U.S.

There are vertical opportunities in banking, insurance or what we are doing in the mortgage industry with Optimal Blue. But there are also a lot of horizontal opportunities. Compliance is a big area of focus. People tend to think of compliance as a regulatory issue, but it is so much broader.

We’re a bit skeptical about marketplace lending. Every once in a while there is some hubris out of Silicon Valley that this new thing will change the world and then it blows up. Some of it survives, but there is going to be an adjustment. We are more inclined to wait and see how far it falls and then look to invest once the business models prove themselves, have more discipline and rigor and are more time-tested.

4 charts that show how banking customers are changing, (Tradestreaming), Rated: AAA

Kabbage’s New Mobile App Reinforces Transition From Fintech To ‘Techfin’, (Forbes), Rated: A

Kabbage had an app for portions of lending management before, this is the first time they have enabled the entire process from application through qualification and funding in the app. And, Frohwein claims the entire process can lead to funding in just minutes.

When asked how this app is different from other online lending companies like OnDeck Capital and LendingTree, he points out that only Kabbage handles everything—including origination and underwriting or approvals—in an automated fashion. Kabbage competitors have a human intervene at some stage in the approval…and that’s where the waiting comes in. This is where the promise of speed pays off for Kabbage and entrepreneurs.

United Kingdom

 Wealthy investors to reduce UK exposure following Brexit vote, (Press Release), Rated: A

69 per cent of high net worth individuals are now looking to ‘rebalance and diversify’ their investment portfolios in order to reduce their exposure to UK-based assets in the wake of the Brexit vote, a global poll reveals.

770 people with investable assets of 1.3m USD or more from countries including the U.S., the UK, Australia, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Hong Kong, South Africa and Switzerland were surveyed in July 2016.

New platform offers repayment “guarantee”, (Alt Fi News), Rated: AAA

Orchard Lending Club (OLC) has been spun out of the AIM-listed Orchard Funding Group PLC, which has a market cap of £22.74m. The relationship between the two entities is instrumental to the P2P offering. The parent company will act to “guarantee” the repayment of investor capital, even in the instance of borrower default. OLC sees this as a key selling point for the platform, stating that “no other peer-to-peer lender in the world offers a similar guarantee”.

A company spokesperson tells AltFi that every defaulted loan will be bought back at par, meaning that investors will not lose principal, although they may miss out on interest payments.

OLC says that it specialises in “heavily-regulated” industries that are historically “unlikely” to default.

Ravi Takhar (pictured above), CEO of Orchard Funding plc, offered his take: “Professional practice and schools financing is a historically safe lending market. In the last 16 years, our group has lent over £600 million to professional practices, schools and their clients and has had zero defaults. We are hoping that this, coupled with the potential returns and ease of access will make this an attractive prospect for investors.”

Investors in the platform are able to choose between receiving interest in monthly instalments or on maturity. The minimum investment amount is £100, with terms of 1-5 years available. Interest rates vary by term, from 4% over 12 months to 7.08% over 5 years. OLC will spread investor funds across the entire loan book, meaning that investors are not required to pick and choose between loans.

Mexico

The rise and rise of Mexican fintech, (Tech Crunch), Rated: A

Since the start of the Mexican tech wave in 2012, a new breed of experienced, tech-savvy and take-no-prisoners founders have emerged and are changing the face of the entrepreneurial ecosystem.

Fintech, in particular, has attracted some of the best; from entrepreneurs with experience in Silicon Valley tech companies such as Adolfo Babatz (PayClip) from PayPal or Adalberto Flores (Kueski) from Ooyala, to others bringing in relevant sector expertise like quant jockDavid Arana (Konfio), P2P pioneer Gerardo Obregon (Prestadero), legal juggernaut Marc Segura (Play Business) and adtech star Pablo Hernandez O’Hagan (Pago Facil), to the ones who have started or scaled financial services businesses, such as hedge fund intrapreneur Fernando Ramos (Briq), and microfinance entrepreneurs Fernando de Obeso (Salud Fácil) and Vicente Fenoll (Kubo) and pawn shop impresario Luis Creel (Cohete).

To complement homegrown talent, Mexico is lucky to welcome entrepreneurs like former AMEX executive Alejandro Constantino (Afluenta) from Argentina, former PlaNet Finance COO Christian Sinobas (KiWi) from Switzerland, serial tech entrepreneurs Ruben Sanchez Souza (Visor) from Brazil and Fernando Cabello from Spain (Aplazame) and former financial sector regulator Daniel Rojas (Rocket) from Colombia.

Mexico represents one of the largest consumer markets in the world, with an emerging middle-class paired with a growing service and manufacturing economy. Against this backdrop, the financial services industry is full of contrasts: Large, nimble banks and financial institutions thrive in a country with abysmal credit penetration, low financial inclusion and scary fraud levels.

Any fintech development relies on a network of pipes, connectors, valves and adapters for data and money to move through an economy. Mexican government, banks and financial companies have been investing in technology and infrastructure since the 1990s. Companies such as BBVA, Citibank, BlackRock, American Express, VISA and Western Union have dynamic Mexican divisions with broad coverage. Today, more than half of internet users bank online and microcredit institutions have fostered a better environment for financial inclusion by creating a culture of credit in micro-business owners.

Despite all the progress in the Mexican entrepreneurial ecosystem, angel investing is still badly lacking. However, a rare bright spot is in the financial services sectors. For example, angel investors have carried most of the financial burden for launching Resuelve tu Deuda,KiWi, Prestadero, Cohete and OpenPay. Indeed, seasoned former and current financiers are participating as angel investors, including Augusto Alvarez, Fernando Padilla, Jorge Ortiz, Fernando Lelo de Larrea and Javier Creel.

But not everything in the garden is rosy. Mexico’s financial regulation was not designed for fast-paced innovation. Despite all the goodwill shown by the government, the money is still not in the bank when it comes to regulation.

China

Aspiring private banks have focus on fintech, (China Daily), Rated: AAA

China will soon kick off the second round of awarding licenses for private banks. Five privatebanks had opened for business in 2015.

Regulators have completed their feasibility study for setting up a private bank in Fujian, aprovince on the southeast coast of China, according to the China Banking RegulatoryCommission’s Fujian Office.

With a registered capital of 3 billion yuan ($450 million), the bank will position itself as a financialtechnology company and seek to build the core business framework around financial technology,innovative payment solutions and supply chain finance.

Twelve private banks are half way through the process of obtaining the necessary approvals. Theregulator’s decision is awaited.

Xiao Ying, deputy director-general of the CBRC’s Beijing Office, said in June, “Regulators aresteadily pushing forward … a private bank in Zhongguancun, a technology hub in Beijing. Morethan 10 private companies have been initially confirmed as sponsors of the bank.”

Ant’s Alipay challenges China Unionpay’s dominance, (Financial Times), Rated: A

Alipay, the online payments unit of Ant Financial, bypasses Unionpay’s network when processing mobile payments to offline merchants like supermarkets, restaurants, and taxis, Eric Jing told the Financial Times in an interview. That means Alipay is effectively diverting billions in fees away from Unionpay, which processes debit and credit card payments.

Merchant fees in China range from 1.5 per cent to 2.5 per cent, compared with between 2.5 per cent and 3.5 per cent in the US, according to Mr Jing.

“We think merchant fees in the US payments market are too high, and it’s not normal. Running a business isn’t easy [for merchants]. The fees are too high,” said Mr Jing. “The situation in the Chinese market is more normal. Merchant fees are reasonable. Competition between different [payment] market actors is a good thing. It allows service recipients to enjoy better service.

Foreign payment processors like Visa and MasterCard have struggled to gain a foothold in China due to the dominance of Unionpay.

But Alipay, which was spun off from online retailer Alibaba Group in a controversial transaction in 2011, now has powerful backers of its own. In April, Ant Financial raised $4.5bn from an investor group including sovereign-wealth fund China Investment Corp, the national social security fund, and China Construction Bank, the country’s second-largest lender.

Author:

George Popescu

July 21st 2016, Daily News Digest

News Comments A lot of news today, and today we have an especially good international section. Please do pay attention to the Australian, Singapore and China sections in particular. (And Lending Times technical team reports that yes, Mailchimp has not answered any of the multiple requests for support from a paying client in 17 hours. […]

News Comments

  • A lot of news today, and today we have an especially good international section. Please do pay attention to the Australian, Singapore and China sections in particular.
  • (And Lending Times technical team reports that yes, Mailchimp has not answered any of the multiple requests for support from a paying client in 17 hours. We will send today’s newsletter by hand again using the older design template.)

United States

United Kingdom

European Union

Switzerland

India

Singapore

Australia

China

News Summary

 

United States

The marketplace lending market has received an influx of positive news recently, (Peer IQ), Rated: AAA

The WSJ reports that Moody’s removed Class C mezzanine bonds issued by CHAI 2015-PM1, 2015-PM2, and 2015-PM3 from downgrade review and confirmed Ba3 rating.

At the time of downgrade review in February, Moody’s cited a faster build-up of delinquencies and charge-offs than expected. Moody’s also increased the expected cumulative lifetime net loss from 8% to 12% (bringing revised estimates in-line with platform and market expectations).
As of the June 15, 2016 distribution date, losses on the CHAI 2015-PM1, 2015-PM2 and 2015-PM3 pools have reached 3.6%, 1.5% and 0.5%, respectively.
Improvement in Credit Spread on MPL ABS bonds
The ratings action was presaged by the ABS market which showed spread tightening from 1000 to 400 bps. Readers may seek to review the May month-end newsletter to see the analysis cited in the WSJ report:
PeerIQ credit spread on MPL ABS bonds
Leading up to the CHAI 2016 PM-1 offering in April, the culmination of ratings actions, regulatory chatter, delinquency fears, and volatile credit markets created an inhospitable environment for new deals. The auction resulted in limited participation and wide initial pricing–10.26% coupon priced to 12.5% yield on the CHAI 2016 PMI-1 C tranche.
Investors that bought the CHAI C tranche at new issuance without any leverage would have seen about 15% price appreciation in 3 months. Investors that performed the up-front credit work and applied analytics to separate the signal from headlines were able to earn outsized returns.
Dislocation creates opportunity
Ironically, the dislocation in recent months has created substantial investor interest in MPL ABS and whole loans. The CHAI 2016-1 PM1 offering prompted investors that were historically dismissive of marketplace lending to do a double-take
Repeat ABS investors are now looking upstream to capture additional whole loan economics.
Large asset managers with double-digit return objectives in a negative to low rate world are looking to strike bargains with platforms. There is still much more to be done. Nevertheless, the climate for establishing relationships with platforms may be as good as ever.

Little Change in LendingClub Loans Since Madden Decision, (BNA), Rated: A

So far, LendingClub loans haven’t changed in average interest rate or risk, either in the 2nd Circuit or nationwide.

Both the total number and value of loans and the amounts arranged through the company have only grown, not diminished, while average FICO scores measuring a borrower’s credit rating remain consistent, and internal loan grades have remained the same. One exception is that the average value of borrowers’ previously requested FICO score did increase steadily since the decision, even though FICO scores at the time of loan issuance did not.

LendingClub has also continued to arrange loans to borrowers in the 2nd Circuit that surpass the interest rate caps in those states. The Madden decision does not prevent national banks from providing loans above a state’s interest rate cap. Instead, it applies to debt collection agencies that purchase those loans.

Lending club changes after Madden vs Midland

As a result of the court’s decision, LendingClub in February renegotiated terms with WebBank—the Utah bank that originates all of the loans through the online service (40 BBD, 3/1/16)

Under the new arrangement, WebBank maintains ongoing accounts for the borrowers and receives regular payments from LendingClub—called “loan-trailing fees”—rather than a single lump sum fee on every loan it originates. The loan trailing fee is based on the total amount serviced by the bank and a “loan fee factor.” A LendingClub representative told Bloomberg BNA that the company does not publicly disclose the amount of the loan fee agreement with WebBank.

Different picture for Prosper

Prosper loan volumes

Representative for Prosper attributed any changes in lending to general market fluctuations but would not comment further for this story.

A 2009 paper from the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta said that loans sold into the secondary market through originate-to-distribute underperformed other loans by 9 percent. A 2010 academic paper funded by the FDIC’s Center for Financial Research also implicated the originate-to-distribute model in the subprime crisis.

Author and University of Michigan Finance Professor Amiyatosh Purnanandam told Bloomberg BNA that part of the problem with the originate-to-distribute model is that once the debt is sold, the originating bank has nothing at risk and the debt buyers don’t always have the skill in evaluating good borrowers as national banks do.

Jefferies revives stalled Lending Club bond: sources, (Reuters), Rated: AAA

Comment: We covered these news last week as well. At that time it was more of rumor. It seems it’s real news now.

Jefferies has revived its stalled Lending Club loan securitization in a club-style deal it has begun to pre-market to only a few select investors, two buyside sources with knowledge of the trade told IFR.

The bank is now looking to sell a two-tranche trade that could offer yields in the 4.25%-7% range, one of the investors said.

The top class of notes of slightly less than one-year were about 60% subscribed, while a longer 2-year tranche was already fully covered, the investor said.

The near-prime loan securitization was shelved after Lending Club said it had repurchased a US$22m pool of loans sold to Jefferies under Laplanche’s watch that included falsified documentation.

Goldman Sachs also hit pause on its potential bond sale of prime Lending Club loans.

But bankers told IFR that Goldman could now look to revive its bond deal, if the Jefferies trade finds favor with investors.

Goldman Sachs Sets Its Eyes on Retail Banking (GS), (Investopedia), Rated: AAA

Fast Start
According to the Wall Street Journal, more than 20,000 new customers have opened internet bank accounts with the Goldman unit since it launched three months ago. Unlike other Internet-only retail banks that tend to offer a wide range of services, Goldman’s products are geared towards long-term savings, and it solely offers its customers the option to open traditional savings and certificate of deposit (CD) accounts. As of July 20, 2016, the bank’s interest rate on online savings accounts was 1.05% while its interest rate on a 5-year CD was 1.85%. In many cases, these rates are a lot higher than what traditional banks pay their customers. For example, Wells Fargo (WFC), Citibank (C), Bank of America (BAC) and Chase (JPM) all pay less than 0.03% APY on regular savings accounts. GS Bank can offer above-average interest rates to its depositors because they do not have the overhead expenses of a typical brick and mortar bank. (See also, The Pros And Cons Of Internet Banks.)

Retail Diversification
For Goldman Sachs, savings accounts may not be as exciting as the main investment banking business. Yet, the company still benefits from expanding into retail banking, enabling Goldman Sachs to diversify its customer base and tap into a segment of the market, retail investors, that they have been unable to serve in the past. GS Bank will also help boost Goldman’s overall liquidity, and keep the company compliant with new regulations calling for more liquidity from financial institutions. Around the same time GS Bank was launched, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) proposed new rules that would require banks to own sufficient ‘‘easy-to-sell’’ assets that would be able to cover any and all liabilities coming due within a one year period. (See also: The History Of The FDIC.)

The Realities Of Alt-Lending Regulation Begin To Set In, (Pymnts), Rated: A

Comment: we covered this yesterday as head news. However it is so important that we would like to remind our readers just in case.

“I suspect more regulation will come to the space, and I think that will suit us well,” said PayPal VP and General Manager of Small Business Lending Darrell Esch in an interview with Forbes last year.

When asked by PYMNTS whether he was concerned about incoming regulation on the space, OnDeck Vice President of External Affairs and Associate General Counsel Daniel Gorfine simply stated, “No, not concerned.”

Reports from Bloomberg BNA this week, however, could signal a shift in how alternative lending players are reacting to the incoming threat of regulation.

“Strong evidence indicates that small business loans under $100,000 share common characteristics with consumer loans yet do not enjoy the same consumer protections,” the Treasury stated in its May report. “Treasury is willing to work with members of Congress to consider legislation that addresses both oversight and borrower protections.”

“I would have to do everything differently,” said CAN Capital Chief Legal Officer Parris Sanz in an interview with the publication. “I can’t give you a rundown of all the various moving parts that would be affected, but I can tell you for sure that it would be significant.”

In a separate interview with Bloomberg BNA, Richard Eckman, a partner at Delaware-based Pepper Hamilton LLP, said alternative lenders are probably wise to pay attention to this possibility.

REFILE-Marlette gets second ever online loan ABS over the line, (Reuters), Rated: AAA

Marlette Funding got its second-ever bond backed by personal loans easily over the line on Wednesday, but investors said the primary market was still wary of deals from the online lending industry.

Marlette’s deal narrowed its pricing from guidance, but investors said global low rates had turned all types of US consumer debt-related assets with yield into a hot commodity.

And similar deals from a year ago were pricing far tighter.

Marlette priced its top US$149m of 1-year Single A (rated by Kroll) notes at 225bp over EDSF, tighter than a 235bp-250bp area guidance, two investors said.

Last July, Citigroup cleared its top class of A3 (rated by Moody’s) bonds – one notch lower – of Prosper Marketplace loans at 140bp over EDSF, according to IFR data.

Riskier Ba3 notes from Citigroup priced at 385bp over interpolated swaps, whereas Marlette’s BBs Wednesday printed at a whopping 825bp over swaps.

By another measure, the BBs were about 75bp more than a deep subprime auto ABS sold this week by lender Consumer Portfolio Services, according to IFR data.

“Marlette’s business model ensures an alignment of interests among the company, the originating bank and institutional loan buyers,” Kroll Bond Ratings wrote in its presale report.

The hunt for yield, meanwhile, has prompted two banks with exposure to online loans to revive postponed deals in the primary market, buyside sources said.

Non-bank Jefferies has rekindled a roughly US$140m bond deal of near-prime Lending Club loans, which was shelved for two months after Laplanche stepped down from Lending Club.

Bankers said that Goldman Sachs could also look to bring out its paused prime-quality Lending Club deal after Jefferies.

United Kingdom

Oxford economist John Kay: Where the opportunities are for fintech, (Alt Fi Credit), Rated: A

Large scale financial services firms are still ripe for disruption, according to the economist John Kay, who believes the City of London and other major financial centres have taken a wrong turn.

Kay explains that he sees four main ways that fintech can be successful and help the real economy by disrupting financial services.

These are firstly; the payments system This is the system that enables the payment of wages and salaries as well as bills. Secondly; capital allocation. This how peoples’ savings become invested in the physical assets and infrastructure of a country. Risk management is third, i.e mitigating the risks of everyday life such as insurance. Lastly is wealth management in a broader sense.

Technology will take over a lot this spectrum and he argues wealth management “is an area of major disruption”, encompassing P2P lending/investing, robo-advice and other discretionary investment services. However, he says payments is the one that will most clearly disrupt things and change our lives. He thinks cash will “seem crazy” in 20 years’ time.

Kay has a sizeable investment in online investment management firm Nutmeg, however, which is one of the dominant players seeking to disrupt the fund management and wealth management industries although they have yet to announce a P2P/market place lending function.

City regulator warns on peer-to-peer lending, (Financial Times), Rated: A

Chris Philp, a Conservative MP on the Treasury committee, said many consumers do not understand the dangers they are exposed to through P2P.

He said the way P2P sites are paid fees without taking on the risk of loans on a balance sheet is akin to the securitisation of subprime loans before the financial crisis.

Mr Bailey said in response, “I agree with you on the risks”.

Mr Bailey noted that although some platforms have so-called reserve funds to pay out to investors in the event that borrowers default, there is “no guarantee in that fund”.

European Union

Renowned investor Peter Thiel increases investment in leading European fintech, Deposit Solutions, (Press Release), Rated: AAA

Prominent venture capital firms today announce they have invested €15 million in European fintech company Deposit Solutions GmbH, a fast growing fintech innovator operating in the €9 trillion market for retail deposits in Europe.

The key highlights include:  PayPal co-founder and Facebook’s first outside investor, Peter Thiel, and German leading fintech investor FinLab jointly increase their share in the company  US investor Greycroft Partners, the global growth fund of e.ventures as well as Valar Ventures come on board as three new partners  The funding round increases the valuation of Deposit Solutions to €110 million.  This is the second successful investment round for Deposit Solutions within a year, following last year´s investment into the Company of €6.5 million. Since then the valuation of the company more than quadrupled.  The funds raised will be used to further develop the proprietary technology platform and continue Deposit Solutions´ international expansion, having already recently expanded to the UK and Switzerland.  Deposit Solutions will increase the number of employees at its UK HQ in the City of London and is expected to launch its retail platform in the UK in 2017.

“We are seeing substantial demand from banks looking to offer their clients attractive deposit products under the existing account relationship. As a result we have gained access to millions of clients and billions of deposit appetite in a very short amount of time. This in turn is very attractive to banks wanting to raise deposits through our platform.”

Max von Bismarck, Chief Business Officer and Managing Director of Deposit Solutions, said: “We address an important structural problem in European banking today for banks and retail customers: Many banks are unable to offer attractive interest rates to their clients. At the same time other banks find it difficult and costly to gain access to retail deposit funding. Our platform provides a solution for both while savers find it easier to get access to better rates.”

ECrowd! Spanish Crowdlending Platform Receives License by the CNMV, (Crowdfunding Insider), Rated: A

Debt-based crowdfunding platform ECrowd! is one of the first Spanish sites to receive a formal operating license from the Comision del Mercado de Valores (CNMV), the securities regulatory agency in Spain. ECrowd!, based in Barcelona, has joined Crowdcube Spain, Lendix and MyTripleA in receiving official approval as a Collaborative Finance Platform under regulations enacted in 2015.

They were on track to achieve 100% growth during 2016. [Comment: Some authors have issues with important verb tenses, it is unclear if the author meant they are or they were.]

Switzerland

The era of Crowlending opens new market for startups, (Startup Ticker), Rated: AAA

In Switzerland significant growth in Crowdlending was achieved in the previous year. The Crowdfunding monitoring report 2016 published by theUniversity of Applied Sciences Luzern early this year reported a significant increase in the total amount of money raised through Crowdlending in the year 2015. A total sum of CHF 7.9 Million was collected through crowdlending with a growth rate of +126%. 266 campaigns were financed. Crowdlending has continued to become more popular not only among start-ups but also among investors.

The crowdlending market in Switzerland is booming and has opened new opportunities for entrepreneurs. New startups operating crowdlending platforms are been established and many projects have been successfully financed. Today, there are 7 crowdlending platforms: the pioneer Cashare for both SMEs and private ventures, CreditGate24 for private and institutional investors, creditworld for both private and on SME loan, Lend, splendid that is specifically focusing on education loans,swisspeers for SMEs and Wecan.fund for SMEs. Other platforms – such as Miteinander-Erfolgreich and Raizers – also operate alongside other models as crowdlending platforms.

India

India’s Mywish Marketplaces raises $ 15 M to expand to new financial products, (Tech Crunch), Rated: AAA

This isn’t a huge round compared to what other companies have closed, but it is entirely strategic. The capital was proved by Franklin Templeton, the U.S. banking giant with more than $700 billion in assets under management. Puru Vashishtha, who is board director at Mywish Marketplaces, told me in an interview that the company didn’t need to raise the funds and it wasn’t short of interest, but it did so for growth opportunities and was very deliberate with the capital that it did close.

“We were chased by a lot of venture capitalists and investors globally,” Vashishtha said. “Because we were profitable, we did not need to raise a lot and didn’t want to dilute too much too soon — that’s one of the reasons we chose Franklin Templeton. Also, Franklin Templeton has built a very big emerging market business, we want to leverage the experience and leadership of their team.”

To backtrack a little, Mywish Marketplaces operates Deal4Loans, a price comparison and loan aggregation website in India. Its products include credit cards, home loans, business loans and personal loans.

Like Credit Karma in the U.S. and countless others worldwide, it works with banks, credit card companies and other financial institutes to help drive customers, while for its users, it tries to provide a holistic look at financing option and which one suits best for each case. The Deal4Loans site claims to have served more than 6.3 million “satisfied” customers, while the company says it has dispersed a total of $2 billion loans in the last six years at a current rate of $400-$450 million per year.

So why is this profitable company — profitable from day one, it claims — raising money?

I hinted at it earlier, but Mywish Marketplaces wants to expand into more verticals with new financing products for Indian consumers.

P2P lender Faircent makes strategic C-suite appointments, (Economic Times), Rated: B

India’s largest peer- to- peer (P2P) lending marketplace, Faircent.com, on Wednesday announced the appointment of Shivam Gupta, who was a part of the global risk management team of Standard Chartered Bank based in Singapore, as chief risk officer and Karun Thareja, who was a part of the leadership at an analytics startup called WyzMindz, as head of marketing.

Thareja, on the other hand has extensive experience in Marketing, Sales and Business Management spanning more than 20 years. His domain expertise includes Analytics, Enterprise Systems, Contact Center Management and Process Management. In his prior roles he has led multi-fold growth in business units at companies like IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, Dassault Systems and NIIT.

Singapore

Online lending platform to offer investor insurance, (Straits Business), Rated: AAA

Online peer-to-peer funding platform Validus Capital has partnered home-grown insurance provider EQ Insurance to offer investor protection on some of the financing it provides to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

It will be the first platform in Singapore to provide investor insurance on its invoice financing services, the company said.

The platform, which was founded last year, has had a zero-per-cent default rate to date thanks to its “rigorous due diligence”, the company said. In the last few months, the company has had 27 SMEs approved for invoice financing services, each with an average revenue of $5 million.

Mr Prakash Somosundram, co-founder of Pealo – an aggregated marketplace for SMEs to access working capital – said the firm is looking into investor protection products. “This will definitely help us to attract more investors, and more people will see this form of investing as an asset class,” he added.

Pealo’s platform was launched in January – 300 SMEs have signed up and there are 46 live campaigns under way.

Mr Brian Teng, chief executive of InvoiceInterchange – which allows SMEs to put up their unpaid invoices for auction – also said the platform hopes to eventually make insurance available to investors.

Mr Teng declined to reveal how many SMEs have used the platform, but said there is significant room for invoice financing to grow as a source of funds for SMEs here.

“The penetration rate of invoice financing in Singapore is still low when compared with nations like Britain and the United States,” he noted. The company has funded $4 million of invoices since its launch in 2015.

Mr Roger Crook, chief executive of Capital Springboard – which runs a crowdfunding platform for invoice financing – said more than 100 SMEs have used the service.

The platform has funded over $85 million worth of invoices over the past year, with over 50 accredited and institutional investors taking part.

Australia

Online home loan marketplace exceeds billion in loans, (Broker News), Rated: AAA

HashChing, an online home loan marketplace, has surpassed $1 billion of home loans as momentum builds for the Sydney fintech company. The platform officially launched in August 2015 with just a few brokers on board across Australia. Now, more than a billion dollars’ worth of loans have been received and more than 1,200 mortgage brokers across the country have signed up. The platform works as an online marketplace connecting consumers to mortgage brokers.

“Customers aren’t just looking to save time. The key to our success is that our offer extends far beyond convenience. We’re able to offer pre-negotiated home loan deals from different lenders with equal features, the same products, but with an even better rate,” Sodhi, co-founder and CEO said.

Narang, co-founder and CIO added: “Our broker registration process has been automated to make it really easy and quick by allowing them to digitally sign the contract which instantly activates their account and saves the paper clutter at both ends.”

As the platform continues to build momentum, Sodhi and Narang have welcomed Claire Wivell Plater of The Fold Legal to their advisory board. Wivell Plater is a long standing member of the Business Advisory Committee to ASIC’s Licensing Division and was recently appointed to the Treasurer’s Fintech Advisory Group.

Narang explains HashChing 2.0 will involve more intelligent use of analytics for a better consumer experience.

China

How Chinese Search Giant Baidu Is Getting Deeper Into Banking, (Fortune), Rated: AAA

Chinese search giant Baidu is investing more deeply in financial technology startups as it seeks to expand its own lending efforts.

On Monday, Baidu announced an investment in ZestFinance, a startup taking on the credit scoring industry by using machine learning and a wide variety of data about borrowers to rate their ability to repay loans.

While the amount of the backing was not disclosed, Baidu also invested Bitcoin payments startup Circle Internet Financial last month, the Nikkei Asian Review reported on Wednesday.

Both investments followed Baidu’s decision last year to form an online bank in partnership with Citic Group’s banking unit. The new bank would be the first in China that “truly understands both the Internet and financial services,” Baidu CEO Robin Li said at the time.

Baidu had also made several notable hires from the finance sector, the Nikkei paper reported, including executives with experience from American Express , online financial marketplace Lufax, and Everbright Bank in China.

While online lending sites like Lending Club LC -0.22% have faltered in the United States, the market is strong in China. The peer-to-peer lending market reached almost $67 billion last year, the largest in the world, Nikkei reported citing data from Citigroup.

Baidu will use ZestFinance’s credit rating technology to assess the creditworthiness of its own users. Unlike the U.S., China lacks centralized credit bureaus, and only a small portion of the population has a credit card.

Author:

George Popescu
George Popescu

July 15th 2016, Daily News Digest

July 15th 2016, Daily News Digest

News Comments United States Jefferies and Lending Club dipping toes in the securitization water to test bringing back to the markets the securitization that started the Lending Club Odyssey. In a context where SoFi and Marlette are getting a lot of attention and bond rates are falling, going to market with a scrubbed clean portfolio, […]

July 15th 2016, Daily News Digest

News Comments

United States

European Union

  • Lendix launches an ELTIF (a new brand of fund cross-border, non-bank structure the EU has created !) for  €50-75m.  Lendix has €2.4m of turnover, €240k of operating profit and employs 11 people.

United Kingdom

Africa

  • A must read. And yes, AFRICA ! Zidisha in 2009 , disbursed a first loan to a Masai nomad in a remote part of Kenya, over a day’s journey from any bank but that had access to the Internet and to the mobile phone money transfer service we use to send loan payments. Smartphones and the internet penetrate much faster virgin markets when they don’t have to fight with existing infrastructure to displace it. Our readers should look at how fast p2p took off in China. I expect that once p2p takes off in real developing countries it will grow even faster than it did in China, although with smaller markets and similar fraud risks. Many people also forget the invaluable GOODWILL the p2p lending industry benefited from when it was just p2p. Goodwill is worth billions of dollars in advertising.

India

 

United States

Jefferies, LendingClub Said to Eye Revival of Scuttled Bond Sale, (Bloomberg), Rated: AAA

Jefferies Group is again considering selling bonds backed by LendingClub Corp. consumer loans, people with knowledge of the matter said, after disclosure issues at the online lender scuttled an effort earlier this year.

Jefferies is having preliminary conversations with investors to gauge interest in the bonds, and may decide not to go ahead with a sale, the people said, asking not to be identified because they aren’t authorized to speak publicly. The firm hasn’t fixed a deal size, but the original offering was expected to be around $150 million, people with knowledge said in April.

Wall Street banks are looking to sell similar bonds tied to loans made by at least two other online lenders in the coming weeks as well, according to a presale report and a person with knowledge of the matter. The offerings are a sign that markets for riskier debt may be thawing as record low bond yields spur investors to hunt for higher returns, while some of the world’s biggest money managers warn that risks are building up across global markets.

Among the other lenders looking to tap the market is Social Finance Inc., one of the biggest online providers of student loan refinancings. It has hired Deutsche Bank AG to underwrite, and may begin marketing a $575 million securitization toward the end of this month, encouraged by strong interest expressed in a similar deal they issued in June, a person with knowledge of the plans said.

Online lender Marlette Funding has hired Goldman Sachs to underwrite a securitization of its own. It could start marketing the notes as early as this week, according to a presale report from Kroll Bond Rating Agency and public disclosures tied to the offering.

Buyers of securities backed by online consumer loans have included DoubleLine Capital, JPMorgan Chase & Co. and BlackRock Inc., according to data compiled by Bloomberg that track ownership disclosures of the securities.

Kabbage Launches Industry’s First Fully-Mobile Application Experience for Small Businesses, (Press Release), Rated: AAA

Kabbage, the financial services data and technology platform, today announced that it has launched a powerful new iOS app for iPhone® and iPad® that allows businesses to complete the entire application process in a few simple steps. The app features drivers’ license recognition, instant mobile check verification, and Apple’s Touch ID™ fingerprint authentication to deliver the best-in-class user experience and reduce the friction usually required to access business capital.

The company now drives $7 million per month in originations from mobile devices and nearly 64,000 monthly user interactions on the app.

Secondary market analysis, ( NSR Invest), Rated: AAA

What loans are available on the secondary market?
We analyzed the current listings on Folio between June 22-27, 2016.  The following are averages across the available listings:

Note Size: $35
Markup/Discount: +4.12%
Interest rate: 16.71%
Yield to Maturity: 15.39%
Loan Age: 11.17 months
Borrower FICO Score at Origination: 686
Days listed on Folio: 4
Remaining Payments: 39

83% of loans have never been late on payments
89% are current on payments
Even split between FICO scores trending up/down

Interestingly, while the average stated interest rate on Folio is 16.71%, the average is only 13.15% (non-weighted average rate) for the entire Lending Club index of loans. This indicates that investors who sell notes on the secondary market are generally listing notes with lower credit grades as compared to the index distribution of loans.

What about loans that are listed almost immediately after origination?
Loans that are listed within three months after origination (aka “fast flips,” because these notes are bought and quickly listed for sale) have a significantly higher markup compared to all loans listed. These fast flips have an average markup of 5.86%, while the entire sample is only 2.18% (only current loans included).

What dictates markup/discount of a loan on the secondary market?
From the data we analyzed, the greatest correlation with the markup/discount of a note is whether or not the borrower has ever made a late payment – about 40% of note pricing was explained by this metric alone. Other variables with positive correlation to the markup/discount are credit score trend, interest rate, and ask price (higher principal value is correlated with higher markup). A negative correlation was found with attributes such as Inquiries in the last six months, number of remaining payments, days since last payment, and outstanding principal.

Can’t Get a Loan for Your Business? I Don’t Believe it, (Fox Business), Rated: AAA

I don’t hear any complaints about getting financing. And there’s a reason for that. The financing environment for small businesses in 2016 is not just good: It’s great. In fact, it’s better than it was before the Great Recession.

Yes, venture capital and angel investing have both recently slowed.

For the established small businesses who reside in industrial parks and office complexes around the country and distribute pipes, manufacture film, mow lawns, fix roofs and serve meals – the financing environment is strong. When they want loans to grow their companies they have plenty of options today.

Don’t believe me? Then why, as Forbes recently reportedOpens a New Window., is Wells Fargo (which releases earnings this week along with other banking giants Citigroup and JP Morgan) calling on those small business applicants that it previously rejected for loans?

Big banks are lending more: According to monthly index prepared by Biz2CreditOpens a New Window., a marketplace for online lending, small business loan approval rates at big banks ($10 billion+ in assets) is now at an all-time high. Big banks this year are approving loans at a 6% higher rate than last, and the approval rating has increased seven of the last nine months. The most recentOpens a New Window. Private Capital Access (PCA) Index by Dun & Bradstreet and Pepperdine University Graziadio School of Business and Management found that small business access to capital has steadily risen over the past four years. In January, Citigroup said itOpens a New Window. lent more than $10 billion to U.S. small businesses in 2015, which was 120 percent more than it loaned in 2009. Wells Fargo has set a 5-year, $100 billion lending goal with a new loan programOpens a New Window.announced earlier this year. PNC Financial Services Group recently announced that it is extendingOpens a New Window. its popular consumer loan programs to now include small businesses.

Alternative lenders are filling in the gaps that big banks can’t serve. The online lending industry has exploded over the past few years, led by firms like CAN Capital, Kabbage, Lending Club and others. PayPal and Square are providing merchant advances for working capital to their customers who qualify based on their cash flow. And other big companies are jumping in: Office supply giant Staples has partnered with Lendio to offer lower cost loansOpens a New Window. to small businesses. American Express recently announcedOpens a New Window. a planned partnership with Lendio. Chase and alternative lender OnDeck Capital just formedOpens a New Window. an alliance. Kabbage just partneredOpens a New Window. with Scotiabank to provide loans to businesses in Canada and Mexico.

The Small Business Administration is booming. According to this reportOpens a New Window. from the Small Business Finance Institute, 2015 was a good year for bankers offering SBA backed financing, particularly the most common 7(a) loans. “SBA lending overall results, as measured by the agency’s monthly approval statistics, finished FY 2015 with better results in every category, but especially rich for 7(a) guaranteed lenders. The 7(a) program “shattered all previous Total SBA Loan Volume 2015 records for total loan volume, and even for the number of loans greater than $150,000. It’s 504 debenture volume also “grew for the first time since 2012, hopefully signaling that declining years are behind the program.”

Of course, the news is not all rosy. It never is. The PCA survey above also found that small businesses’ access to traditional bank loans, while increasing, still lags behind that of middle market companies, which means that many small businesses still rely on personal assets and personal credit for financing.

So please, don’t tell me that you can’t get a loan for your small business. You can. I understand if it may be too expensive because lenders believe that your business is a riskier investment. However, that’s your choice. Be grateful that you have one.

CreditexchangeTM Raises Seed Capital from Kuber FinancialTM, (Business Wire), Rated: A

Creditexchange, India’s first hybrid digital consumer loans platform and institutional marketplace, has announced that it has raised an undisclosed amount of funding from Kuber Financial as part of its $500,000 seed round.

Creditexchange is building a digital loan origination business which it intends to support with a marketplace for institutional investors through which they can co-invest in portfolios of loans originated by Creditexchange. The hybrid model allows Creditexchange to overcome the issues faced by existing Indian peer-to-peer and marketplace lending models, mainly with regard to turn-around-times and opaqueness around regulation.

Creditexchange had previously announced a strategic technology partnership at LendIt San Francisco 2016 with LendFoundry, a market-leading platform which is trusted by large online marketplace lenders in North America, to develop a best-in-class platform customized for the Indian market.

Kuber Financial is a global FinTech holding company that invests in analytics and technology driven financial services start-ups. It is founded by Timothy Li, an established figure in the US FinTech space where he has been an advisor to start-ups like Kabbage, Rocket Loans, Blinker etc. besides being the ex-CIO of Realty Mogul, ex-CRO of Quick Bridge Funding and ex-GM of consumer lending at Loan Depot. The advisory board of Kuber is made up of Jim Redmond (Advisor to Funding Circle), Eric Bunting (early investor of Kabbage and Funding Circle), Jason Raneses (Software Architect at Credit Karma) and Amy Wan (ex-General Counsel of Patch of Land).

How the Underwriting Process Works With Funding Circle, (Fundera), Rated: A

Soon after you hit the submit button to send your completed online application, you’ll get a call from an account manager. This personal contact will not only help guide you through the process but will serve as an intermediary between you and the underwriter, according to Account Manager Natalie Roberts.

The account manager is charged with the task of getting to know more about your company’s present needs as well as your growth plans for the future. They’ll discuss your loan application with your assigned underwriter, who’s hard at work reviewing your credit report and other financial data.

To that end, if the underwriter is missing information from you or would like to discuss something about your business in more detail, you might get a direct call from them. “It depends on how the process is going,” says Roberts.

If you do receive a phone call, it will usually last about 15 to 20 minutes, depending on the size and complexity of your business and loan application.

You should be prepared to tell your story and answer the following questions:

  • Why did you start your company?
  • What opportunities and challenges do you face?
  • How do you derive revenue?
  • How will this loan help your business grow?
  • How do you plan to repay the loan?

What Else Does the Underwriter Look For?

Collateral

This relates to any type of assets or property that might secure your loan.

Capital

Funding Circle will examine how much capital you’ve invested in your own business.

Capacity

In a nutshell, your capacity is your ability to pay back your loan.

Conditions

This relates to any situation that may affect your funding.

Character

Your character gives Funding Circle a general view of your trustworthiness and stability. For example, the underwriting team may want more information on how much experience you have in your industry and whether you have historically made payments on time. An underwriter might also take a look at your social media feeds and read any of your company’s reviews on sites like Yelp. Positive customer reviews and comments go a long way.

Red flags

Because Funding Circle is in the game to help fuel your growth, if you’re looking for a loan as a lifeline, this will be a red flag. Funding Circle will see this if your company has taken on a large amount of new debt in the past 9 months with no real reason to explain this.

July 28, 2016. This transaction represents the second securitization collateralized by unsecured consumer loans originated by Cross River Bank, under the Marlette Best Egg Platform and sold to Marlette Funding, LLC (“Marlette”) or its affiliate.

Founded in 2013 in Wilmington DE, Marlette operates an online marketplace lending platform, operating under the Best Egg brand (

European Union

Lendix launches first ever SME lending fund in ELTIF structure, (Alt Fi), Rated: AAA

Recent European Union regulation created the ELTIF, a new brand of fund available for retail and professional investors that is designed to stimulate cross-border, non-bank investment across the EU.

The Paris-based SME lending platform has launched the first European Long Term Investment fund (ELTIF) dedicated to SMEs. The French stock market regulator, the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF), gave the go ahead to Lendix to take advantage of the ELTIF format following its launch. It is called the Lendix SME Loans fund II.

The fund will be between €50-75m in size and is currently backed by several larger institutional investors including CNP Assurances, ZencapAM (OFI Group) and the fund ‘Prêtons Ensemble’ managed by Eiffel Investment Group and sponsored by Aviva France and AG2R La Mondiale.

Lendix allows SMEs to borrow €30k to €1.5m over periods ranging from 3 to 84 months to finance their development and expansion. The average loan size is €250k.

Patrick de Nonneville, chief operating officer of Lendix says the average SME borrowing on Lendix has €2.4m of turnover, €240k of operating profit and employs 11 people.

“It’s under the radar of all existing debt funds, so it’s a new asset class for investors. Lendix strengthens its objective to serve both private investors selecting their loans directly on the marketplace and institutional investors investing through the fund,” he said.

United Kingdom

Funding Knight Review – The Safety of Peer-to-Peer Lending, (FX News Call), Rated: B

Comment: A better article on how Funding Knight failed would really be useful for the industry. If you would like to write it Lending Times would love publishing it.

In the wake of emerging peer-to-peer websites, many of those who were saving with Funding Knight had lost hope of getting back their money. Claims indicated that the company was running out of cash, causing its fall into administration. This caused panic to more than 900 savers, but nevertheless, a recent Funding Knight review has given them a new dawn given the rescue of the firm by GLI Finance, an investment firm.

Industry says August rate cut “inevitable”, (Financial Reporter), Rated: A

Following the news that the Bank of England’s MPC voted to maintain Bank Rate at 0.5%, the financial services industry says that the Committee has made its intention to cut rates in the near future clear, and widely expects a rate cut of 0.25% next month.

Africa

Zidisha: the first global peer-to-peer microlending platform, (Blasting News), Rated: A

Lenders anywhere in the world can visit our website and browse loan proposals written directly by disadvantaged entrepreneurs in developing countries. Each lender can lend as little as a dollar to help crowd-fund a loan project. We send the funds directly to the borrower, and as the borrower repays, we return the funds to lenders. Lenders can either withdraw the repayments, or use them to fund new loans. This is a high-impact way to do philanthropy because the funds keep being recycled into new loans; $50 put into a Zidisha loan fund generates on average $750 worth of loans in five years! Lenders can also dialogue directly with the borrowers.

In 2006, I was volunteering in Senegal, Africa, raising microloans for women in rural villages through Kiva.

When I returned to the United States, we registered a local microfinance organization and hired a loan officer to manage the loans and to liaise with Kiva on the villagers’ behalf. Though we tried to be frugal, this ended up being expensive due to administrative costs. To be sustainable, we would have to charge the women more than 30 percent interest, almost enough to leave them poorer than they were before taking the loans! This is the story of microfinance in general: the world’s poorest people are paying the highest interest rates – the global average is 35 percent, but rates of 80 percent – 100 percent are not uncommon.

Eliminating the intermediary bank allowed us to reduce the cost of each loan to just 5 percent. In 2009, we disbursed our first loan to a Masai nomad in a remote part of Kenya, over a day’s journey from any bank but that had access to the Internet and to the mobile phone money transfer service we use to send loan payments. We named the organization “Zidisha,” which is Swahili for “grow,” as in an investment, business or quality-like prosperity. We now have more than 55,000 members in 157 countries and have raised loans for more than 28,000 small businesses around the world.

We’d like to be able to fund everyone who applies and also expand to offerlending services in more developing countries. If we can help people improve their quality of life, then building Zidisha is time well spent.

India

Cibil builds 360 degree view of consumer; what you really must know, (The Financial Express), Rated: A

As lending by microfinance institutions (MFIs) was never higher, it is no surprise that the country’s premier credit information company (CIC), CIBIL, has decided to get into this segment as well. In an interaction with FE, its chief operating officer Harshala Chandorkar speaks about challenges involved and how it is a win-win situation for MFIs, banks and borrowers.

Is the profiling and the data that you have acquired for MFI borrowers any different from that of borrowers from banks? Does the fact that most of the MFI lending tends to happen to joint liability groups (JLGs) a challenge?

The data points remain the same. Most MFI borrowers have a voter ID and an Aadhaar number. The challenge, however, arises when it comes to other aspects. Names tend to be very common in small villages. Addresses are not as strong and differentiated as that in metros.

With the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) deciding to bring peer-to-peer (P2P) lending platforms under its purview, do you expect a change in the way individual’s credit appraisals are done, particularly given that such platforms are probably going to entirely bypass institutions like yours?

I think it will be beneficial for everyone if all the lending via P2P platforms is reported to credit information bureaus as it will help even P2P lenders to take informed decisions when they decide to lend to an individual. Secondly, the non availability of P2P credit information to banks might make borrowers over leveraged.

Author:

George Popescu