Friday November 24 2017, Daily News Digest

Lend Academy investment accounts

News Comments Today’s main news: Revolut sings 1 millionth customer. KBRA assigns preliminary ratings to Lending Club’s Consumer Loan Underlying Bond Credit Trust 2017-P2. Funding Circle to launch Isa. Orca is launching investment platform. Chinese regulators investigating potential Qudian data leak. China cracks down on shadow banking. China tells provincial goverments to halt microlender approvals. Swiss consortium adopts single digital identity for […]

Lend Academy investment accounts

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India

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United States

Goldman Sachs Faces Doubts About Loss Rates at New Online Lender (Newsmax Finance), Rated: AAA

As Goldman Sachs Group Inc. lends more money to Main Street, one question won’t go away: How many borrowers will pay them back?

A recent example it gave suggests the firm expects loan losses to be lower than what some rivals are seeing, and half of what many credit-card lenders experienced the last time the economy went south.

The bank is counting on its consumer push to deliver $1 billion in revenue growth over the next three years. While the firm looks to attract borrowers with better credit than many rivals, others think it may be underestimating the risks of a business where it’s the upstart.

My Quarterly Marketplace Lending Results – Q3 2017 (Lend Academy), Rated: AAA

If you have been reading these posts in the past year or so you will have noticed a steady decline in my returns, primarily caused by underperformance in my LendingClub accounts.

Earlier this year I adjusted my strategy and started investing across the entire risk spectrum but it is a bit like steering a battleship. Given my many thousands of notes it takes a while for any changes to show up in my portfolio returns.

My trailing 12 month returns for the year ended September 30, 2017 across all my accounts was 6.64%.

Source: Lend Academy

My main LendingClub account has performed poorly over the past 12 months. My TTM return is at a paltry 1.64%, my lowest return ever. All of my LendingClub accounts are below 5% and all have shown reduced returns over the past year.

Prosper continues to perform quite well. My three accounts are all returning between 7% and 8% which I consider quite respectable. My average interest rate of the loans I have invested in is just under 20% but returns have been quite consistent recently in the 7-8% range.

Source: Lend Academy

PeerStreet is a real estate platform focused on fix and flip properties. These are short term loans, typically between 6 and 24 months, and they are backed by the property. I use their automated investment tool to invest in only those loans that are paying 8% or more, up to a 75% LTV and a duration up to 24 months.

My first new entrant this quarter is AlphaFlow. They are a real estate platform that build diversified portfolios of fix and flip properties for you. What I like about AlphaFlow is that they deploy your money quickly, my entire investment was fully deployed in a matter of days. And they diversify across 75-100 properties, my own portfolio currently has 83 investments in 22 states with an average LTV of 68%.

Finally, as I do every quarter I want to end by highlighting the net interest number which for the last 12 months stands at $46,631.

Get the lowdown on the full range of Peter Renton investments here.

KBRA Assigns Preliminary Ratings to Consumer Loan Underlying Bond (CLUB) Credit Trust 2017-P2 (BusinessWire), Rated: AAA

Kroll Bond Rating Agency (KBRA) assigns preliminary ratings to three classes of notes issued by Consumer Loan Underlying Bond (CLUB) Credit Trust 2017-P2 (“CLUB 2017-P2”). This is a $330.0 million consumer loan ABS transaction that is expected to close December 6, 2017.

Preliminary Ratings Assigned: Consumer Loan Underlying Bond (CLUB) Credit Trust 2017-P2

Class Preliminary Rating Expected Initial Class Principal
A A- (sf) $239,400,000
B BBB (sf) $34,600,000
*C BB (sf) $56,000,000

This transaction is LendingClub Corporation’s (“LendingClub” or the “Company”) third rated sponsored securitization and the second sponsored securitization consisting of “prime” unsecured consumer loans facilitated by LendingClub’s proprietary technology platform supporting an online marketplace that connects borrowers and investors by offering a variety of loan products originated by issuing banks through the platform, www.lendingclub.com (the “LendingClub Platform” or the “Platform”).

The transaction has initial credit enhancement levels of 35.45%, 26.05% and 10.83% for the Class A, Class B and Class C notes, respectively.

China War on Online Loans Makes Waves in New York: QuickTake Q&A (Bloomberg), Rated: A

Chinese President Xi Jinping’s campaign to reduce risk in the financial system is being felt in New York. The assault on the sector threatens to stymie any new listings of such lenders on New York’s stock exchange — as well as spelling trouble for investors in the handful of companies that have already listed.

Joseph Otting Has a Lot on His Plate as the New Comptroller (Crowdfund Insider), Rated: A

Joseph Otting, a former banker and CEO of OneWest Bank, was approved by the Senate in a party line vote last week to take over the helm at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC).

If Otting decides to stand up to the banking hyperbole it won’t be an easy task.

All of this begs the question: who will gain if Fintech is allowed to compete with banks?

One-Third of Small Business Owners Work Half of the Major Holidays (Small Business Trends), Rated: A

One-third of small business owners work at least three of the six major holidays in the US.

Kabbage’s new survey reveals several work/life balance issues related to the sacrifices small business owners are willing to make. The research involved surveying 400 small business owners, with 67 percent stating they expect to increase revenues by the end of the year. More than half of the small business owners interviewed said they anticipate an increase in revenue of 10 percent or higher.

The survey found that 60 percent of small business owners only take one full vacation a year, while 23 percent take less than two holidays off annually. Furthermore, when on holiday, 75 percent of small business owners continue working.

Consumers Say Hedge Fund Financed Illegal Tribal Lending (Law360), Rated: A

Vermont residents on Tuesday hit a hedge fund with a proposed class action in federal court alleging it helped concoct a sham tribal payday lending scheme meant to skirt laws preventing companies from charging consumers exorbitant interest rates while hiding behind tribal sovereign immunity.

Plaintiffs Jessica Gingras and Angela Given accused the firm, Victory Park Capital Advisors LLC, of striking a deal with payday lender Plain Green and the Chippewa-Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation to use the tribe’s name in exchange for a small…

Payday Lenders Try Legislative Run Around State Laws, CFPB Regulation (Chicago Crusader), Rated: A

The same deception that hides the real cost of predatory, consumer loans is reflected in the title of pending legislation in both the House of Representatives and in the Senate. The Protecting Consumers’ Access to Credit Act of 2017 (H.R. 3299 and S. 1624) would allow payday lenders, high-cost online lenders, and other predatory lenders to partner with banks to make loans that surpass existing state interest rate limits.

How the Fed Can Help Families Living Paycheck to Paycheck (Real Clear Markets), Rated: A

The next Chairman of the Federal Reserve System (Fed) confronts a deep and growing problem: rising inequality. A new Fed Chair could combat this problem in an unexpected way by implementing real-time payments. The few days between checks clearing are a major driver of why it is so expensive to be poor. They are also unnecessary given technology and easily removable with some regulatory will. Real-time payments could save billions of dollars for American families living paycheck to paycheck.

The check casher costs $20, but two overdrafts cost $70. Check cashing is a $2 billion a year business and represents yet another cost born by those who have less.

The technology for real-time payments has been around for a long time. The United Kingdom adopted real-time payments in 2008. Japan, Poland, Mexico and South Africa all have the technology in place today. Financial technology (FinTech) firms like PayPal are offering real-time payments for customers who exist on both ends of their system. But unless your employer will migrate to using a FinTech for payroll, you need the banking system to modernize.

Peer pressure (BreakingViews), Rated: A

The Federal Reserve’s eggheads are usually a pretty reliable bunch. So when researchers at the central bank’s Cleveland branch recently published a study asserting that peer-to-peer loans were defaulting at rates reminiscent of subprime mortgages a decade ago, it seemed to confirm the worst fears about the budding online-lending market. But industry critics and academics questioned the researchers’ data, forcing the Fed to pull the paper.

It’s not easy to come by good data for this nascent field of finance, which makes the botched study all the more regrettable.

SoFi Among Companies To Buy Six-Second Ads During Fox’ Thanksgiving Game (Sports Business Daily), Rated: B

Duracell and personal finance company SoFi have “snapped up” some of the six-second spots Fox has set aside for its Thanksgiving broadcast of Vikings-Lions, while Disney will “air a mini trailer for ‘Star Wars: Episode VIII The Last Jedi,'” according to Anthony Crupi

United Kingdom

Fintech group Revolut signs up its millionth customer (Irish Times), Rated: AAA

Revolut, an app-based banking alternative which has over 50,000 customers in Ireland, has now signed up 1 million customers globally and claims it has saved users over £120 million (€134 million) in fees.

London-based Revolut said it is now signing up between 3,000 and 3,500 new users every day, an increase of 50 per cent growth from three months ago.

Users have now made over 42 million transactions since the company officially launched in July 2015 with a total transaction volume of $6.1 billion.

In an email to its customers seen by Moneywise and confirmed directly with Funding Circle, the provider says it will allow existing customers to invest in an Isa from Thursday 30 November.

It has yet to announce a launch date for new customers and says this is because it is anticipating strong demand for the product. For the same reason, customers will not be able to transfer existing Isas to Funding Circle when the product is launched.

Customers must deposit at least £1,000 to open an Isa.

Funding Circle borrowers back joining European Free Trade Agreement post-Brexit (P2P Finance News), Rated: A

MORE THAN half of small business owners want the UK to join the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) once Brexit is complete, Funding Circle research has found.

A survey of 1,254 borrowers on the peer-to-peer lending platform found 57 per cent would support EFTA, also known as the ‘Norway option,’ as it provides a regional free trade area comprising of Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, and Switzerland.

Orca to unveil diversified P2P portfolios for investors (P2P Finance News), Rated: AAA

PEER-TO-PEER analysis firm Orca is set to launch an investment platform.

The proposition will automatically build portfolios of P2P investments across more than 50 per cent of the market.

The portfolios would include major lenders across the consumer, business and property lending space such as Zopa, Funding Circle and Assetz Capital.

Digital wealth manager start-up Fountain secures seed investment (AltFi), Rated: A

Fountain, a digital wealth management platform aiming to “empower” investors to achieve their financial goals has secured seed round investment.

The cash, an undisclosed sum, came from a number of City figures led by Patrick Day, chairman of Day Cooper Day, a specialist pensions provider.

Peer to Peer Lender ThinCats to Rebrand as Next Phase of SME Funding in UK (Crowdfund Insider), Rated: A

ThinCats unveiled a new brand last week at an event attended by more than 100 business leaders. The gathering took place at the National Space Centre in Leicester but the new branding will not be officially launched until mid-December.

Robo-guidance or electric dreams? (FT Adviser), Rated: A

Effectively, FG17/8 is the new bible for everyone interested in developing a new automated (digital /robo /telephone-based) advice solution. Or it is a checklist for those who have already trodden down this well-worn path.

Do note though – as if you did not already know – the paper “contains general guidance and is not binding”, is not “exhaustive”, must not be read in isolation of the handbook, and does not address any potential changes that might arise from the implementation of the Insurance Distribution Directive. (Heaven forbid anyone would actually take any accountability for what is between the covers).

Two years. Two years. To pull together in one document the working practices that professional firms already follow with their eyes closed?

Three-quarters of advisers unthreatened by robo-advice (Financial Reporter), Rated: A

New research shows that 78% of financial advisers are confident robo-advice offers no threat to their business, despite nearly half expecting more demand for robo-advice over the next 12 months.

The research from Aegon found that the degree of concern felt by advisers correlates to the typical size of their client portfolios, with advisers whose client portfolios are at the lower end of the scale more alert to the threat from the lower cost option of robo-advice.

For advisers with client portfolios of more than £200k, 88% feel it offers no threat to their business, and even for portfolios of up to £100k, the figure remains high at 73%.

While the majority of advisers believe robo-advice is no threat to their business, a third (31%) do point to robo-advice and similar digital services as one of the top challenges to the wider industry over the coming two years, a little behind Brexit (40%).

China

China Regulators, Police Probe Qudian Client Data Leak (Bloomberg), Rated: AAA

Chinese regulators and police are investigating a potential leak of data from online lender Qudian Inc., according to people with knowledge of the matter.

Officials are probing allegations that data from more than a million students who are clients of Beijing-based Qudian was leaked and possibly sold online, said the people, who asked not to be named discussing private information.

The probe’s initial findings show that at least part of the leaked data match information clients had provided to Qudian, the people said. Investigators are checking whether the data came from Qudian, if the company was aware of the breach, and whether it took necessary measures to ensure the safety of personal information it collects.

China Commences Crackdown on Shadow Banking (The Epoch Times), Rated: AAA

Chinese regulators introduced major rules on Nov. 17—the scale of which has been compared to the U.S. Dodd-Frank Act—to unify regulations for the asset managementindustry and curtail shadow banking activities.

The rules are broad-based, covering China’s $15 trillion of asset management products issued by all financial institutions.

For example, the rules will prohibit asset managers from promising guaranteed rates of return to investors, and require issuers to set aside 10 percent of their fees from managing client assets in escrow, to serve as a buffer against losses.

For publicly offered funds, total assets cannot exceed 140 percent of the funds’ net asset value. The same ratio is set at 200 percent for privately offered funds.

China Urges Local Governments To Halt New Internet Microlender Approvals (PYMNTS), Rated: AAA

China is regulating micro loans on the internet, with a high-level Chinese government agency issuing a notice urging provincial governments to halt approval of new web-based online lenders.

The firms are lending to consumers in China that have been turned down by Chinese banks. However, interest rates on these tiny loans can be very high — something borrowers don’t realize.

China’s Micro-Lender Assault Threatens Path to U.S. Listings (Bloomberg), Rated: AAA

According to the International Financial News, China plans to purge the country’s 157 online micro-lenders, leaving only large state-owned companies and the biggest internet firms intact with licenses. Few of the existing lenders will survive, said the newspaper, which is managed by the official People’s Daily.

A comprehensive cleansing of the industry, which offers almost immediate unsecured loans over the Internet, often at high interest rates, would escalate earlier moves to crack down on the sector and its estimated $152 billion of loans. News that China has halted further approvals for online micro-lenders has already pummeled the New York shares of firms like Qudian Inc. and PPDAI Group Inc.

“It would seem to be an enormous, enormous risk to try an IPO with that hanging over your head,” said Christopher Balding, an associate professor at Peking University HSBC School of Business. “It would most likely put a halt to any IPO plans of these companies now.”

Source: Bloomberg

China Online Lender Qudian’s Fast Track From NYSE Darling To Dog (Forbes), Rated: AAA

The listing of online lender Qudian at the New York Stock Exchange on Oct. 18 heralded the birth of a new China billionaire, 34-year-old chairman and CEO Luo Min. The stock rose by as much as 43% that day, giving Luo a fortune worth $2.2 billion amid optimism about industry prospects.

Five weeks later, more than half of Qudian’s value has been wiped out and he’s on the verge of dropping from the ranks of the world’s billionaires altogether. Qudian fell 16% last night and at yesterday’s closing price, Luo’s fortune (which he shares in a trust with family) was worth $1.02 billion. Investors in other China fintech stocks got socked yesterday, too.  Jingpu Technology plunged 12.9% to $5.75, way below it IPO price of $8 from last week.   China Rapid Finance fell 6% yesterday and PPDai fell a whopping 24%.

Debt: The secret sauce of Alibaba’s Singles Day success (Technode), Rated: A

One of most notable online lending players aptly named Huabei (花呗, Just Spend) comes from the company that invented Singles Day—Alibaba.

To help them give away money to uncle Jack Ma, as hand-choppers have joked, this year Huabei has raised its credit limit to almost 80 percent during the promotion activities before Singles Day, allowing users to spend an extra RMB 2200 on average.

Huabei is the credit card of millennials, it targets the young and the unbanked. According to a report published recently, 86% of Huabei users belong to the generations born after the 80s and 90s (in Chinese). The fact that the 60% of them never owned a credit card is a good illustrator why online lending has experienced such a meteoric rise in China.

According to Huabei data, 38% of users choose to repay their debt in 12 monthly installments (in Chinese).

Credit Suisse-Backed Online Lender to Plan $ 500 Million IPO (Bloomberg), Rated: A

WeLab Ltd. has picked banks to advise on a Hong Kong initial public offering that could raise about $500 million, according to people with knowledge of the matter. The China-focused lender, whose backers also include billionaire Li Ka-shing, is aiming to list as soon as next year, the people said, asking not to be identified because the information is private.

An Overdone Payday Mayday (Bloomberg), Rated: A

Stop panicking about China’s online lenders. The real target of the crackdown is rogue local governments.

Financial News said government entities can’t issue new licenses for internet micro-lending beyond the 157 institutions that already have them. The consequences were immediate: Zhejiang Busen Garments Co., for one, said in a filing Thursday it’s terminating plans to set up an online lender.

As of September, there were 8,610 micro-lenders with 970 billion yuan ($147 billion) of loans outstanding. Many of those weren’t licensed by national regulators such as the People’s Bank of China or the China Banking Regulatory Commission, which have strict rules.

Rather, authorization was handed out by local governments, most of which have no fintech expertise, to companies claiming to be affiliated with state-owned enterprises.

Source: Bloomberg

Mobile payment users in China exceed 520m (GB Times), Rated: A

Ant Financial, Alibaba’s financial affiliate, has announced that China now has more than 520m mobile payment users, reports state-owned news agency Xinhua.

report released by the People’s Bank of China detailing the country’s payment system in the second quarter of 2017, notes that Chinese banks dealt with 8.6bn payments from mobile services during that period – up 33.84 percent from last year.

The combined value of mobile payments increased by 33.8 percent to 39.2tn yuan (around US$6tn).

How fintech companies create an alternative capital market in China (The Asset), Rated: A

IN China, an alternative capital market is taking shape with the rise of fintech companies, where fintechs are the intermediaries linking borrower and lenders. Moreover, fintechs are edging into the credit rating space, leveraging on their big data capabilities.

One core competence of fintech companies is their IT stability in the areas of payments and cloud computation. The strength of their IT infrastructure makes the technology players resilient under extreme conditions. During the recent Singles’ Day sale on November 11 – China’s online shopping bonanza equivalent to that of the US’ Black Friday – Alibaba’s Alipay processed a peak of 256,000 transactions per second and Alibaba Cloud processed as many as 42 million instructions per second.

European Union

Swiss Consortium Adopts Single Digital Identity For Online Purchases (PYMNTS), Rated: AAA

A consortium of nine large companies — including UBS, Credit Suisse, Swisscom, Swiss Post, SIX, Raiffeisen, Swiss Railways, Zuercher Kantonalbank and Mobiliar — will enable Swiss consumers to use a single digital identity when making eCommerce purchases.

According to a report in Reuters, the idea behind the project is to get to a point where consumers can use one login to make purchases at shops, buy train tickets and engage in banking activities online. The group aims to create a joint venture in 2018.

Exclusive Interview with Lendoit CEO Ori Erez (Chipin), Rated: A

Lendoit is a Decentralized P2P lending platform, which connects borrowers and lenders from all over the world in a trusted, fast and easy way using the advantages of Smart Contracts and the Blockchain technology.

What do you think is the biggest problem Lendoit will solve and why is it important?

The lending industry is not efficient because it’s controlled by centralized financial organizations that set the interest rates according to their own interest. It’s not fair that honest borrower from Brazil is paying 60% interest rate while borrower from Japan pays around 1%.

Lendoit uses three types of scoring:

  1. Local rating provided by a local supplier from the borrower’s state. Lendoit is working to create cooperation with some entities in various countries to provide this service.
  2. International scoring providers that are using innovative methods such as scanning social networks and scanning the borrower’s e-mail.
    Lendoit is working to create cooperation with these International entities.We have already signed / in the process of signing with several companies in the scoring area, such as FriendlyScore, BLOOM, LENNO, and others, as noted in Lendoit’s WhitePaper.
  3. In the Lendoit eco-system platform, there is a special Smart Contract: a Reputation contract that retroactively checks each borrower who takes a loan, and set reputation score according to his or her historical activities within the platform

My P2P Lending Investment Portfolio at Bondora is now 5 Years Old (P2P-Banking), Rated: A

5 years have passed since I first started to invest into p2p lending at Bondora in October 2012. I still have 604 loans in my Bondora portfolio with an outstanding principal of 7,467 Euro at an average interest rate of 23.78%. Of these 2,746 Euro are in current loans, 778 Euro in overdue loans and 3,941 Euro in 60+ days overdue loans.

Bondora shows a net return of 19.0% for my portfolio. In my own calculations, using XIRR in Excel, assuming that 30% of my 60+days overdue and 15% of my overdue loans will not be recovered, my ROI calculations result in 17.2% return. Even if I assume total loss on all outstanding loans that are 60+days overdue my ROI calculation results in 15.6%.

Source: P2P-Banking

Finbee Expands into Czech Market (P2P-Banking), Rated: A

FinBee, a Lithuania based p2p lending platform, has started to expand internationally by launching in the Czech Republic. By 2020, FinBee plans to begin operations in another two European countries.

FinBee will provide personal lending services for residents of the Czech Republic as well as for investors from across the entire European Union.

International

Investors divide in peer-to-peer lending (Silicon Republic), Rated: AAA

Banks – local banks, in particular – have traditionally been the main and sometimes the only source of external capital for SMEs. However, increasing regulatory requirements have lowered the probability for SMEs to obtain access to bank financing.

P2P lending is part of the wider universe of crowdfunding. This is a bigger market than many people expect. For example, a 2016 paper for the European Commission reported that crowdfunding expanded by 167pc in 2014 and reached $16.2bn. North America remains the largest market ($9.5bn), followed by Asia ($3.4bn) and Europe ($3.3bn). While there are no accurate figures on the Irish market, Orca Money reports that the UK P2P market had £9.6bn cumulative lending since 2010, £1bn of which was in Q1 2017. In 2016, Orca Money reported that the UK P2P market comprised 177,000 retail investors with consumer (46pc), business (35pc) and property (19pc) borrowers.

P2P platforms have been very cautious about the loans they offer to investors, with most of them being classified as low-risk. This has resulted in low default rates and acceptable positive returns for investors. The potential for positive returns has attracted institutional and professional investors (eg investment banks, venture capitalist etc) into the game and created a disproportionate capital supply and demand. Such a trend is particularly visible in the US and UK, the two largest P2P markets, but it has recently emerged in smaller markets like Australia and New Zealand and is likely to occur, to a greater or lesser extent, in all regulated markets, including Ireland.

The lack of a clear regulation has arguably prevented the growth of the Irish P2P lending market by discouraging both investors and small businesses to participate. A clear regulatory framework is necessary to ensure transparency and to increase investors’ confidence in P2P lending markets.

Initial coin offerings: regulation and the risks (Lexology), Rated: AAA

On 12 September 2017, FCA published a consumer warning on initial coin offerings (ICOs), stating that they are ‘very high-risk, speculative investments’, and that ‘there is a good chance of losing your whole stake’ as a purchaser.

Earlier in September, the People’s Bank of China had denounced ICOs as ‘illegal fundraising’ and issued a ban that caused the value of cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin to plummet. The following day, Canadian regulators accepted a firm offering ICOs into its regulatory sandbox as part of its broad goal of supporting innovative fintech projects. The European Securities and Markets Authority has been the latest to denounce ICOs, echoing the FCA’s warning to consumers that ICOs are ‘very risky and highly speculative investments.’

By applying the conditions from SEC vs Howey, the US Supreme Court test for determining whether transactions qualify as investment contracts (and by extension, securities), the investigation found that the tokens emergent from the DAO’s ICO are securities and thus could fall within the US regulatory perimeter.

The SEC made the classification by fulfilling the following criteria from the Howey test:

  1. Investment of money
  2. Reasonable expectation of profits
  3. Derived from the managerial efforts of others
  4. Investor voting rights were limited

FintruX Network: Making Unsecured Loans Highly Secure (BTCManager), Rated: A

The FintruX Network has been established to transform unsecured loans to highly secured loan without any hurdles to borrowers and investors. The platform has unique blockchain approach of global P2P lending highways which proposed to raise $30 million by selling digital tokens.

 

 

The FintruX Network aims to enhance credit enhancements by introducing cascading levels which involves:

  •         Additional collateral
  •         A local third-party guarantor
  •         Cross-collateralization
  •         Fintrux ultimate protection reserve
Australia

Financial services industry to get its Groundhog Day commission of inquiry (Financial Review), Rated: A

But it was probably not as long as the minimum two years contemplated by O’Sullivan and the Greens for the proposed Banking and Financial Services Commission of Inquiry.

It should not be a problem if the three judges have no background or experience in fintech, cryptocurrencies, blockchain, peer-to-peer lending, equity crowd funding and payment systems riding off messaging services such as those offered by WeChat, Facebook, Apple and Google.

After all, this is not about the future. This inquiry is about spending more than $200 million looking in the rear view mirror.

The age of algorithmic advice (Financial Standard), Rated: A

Futurist and chief executive of global consultancy firm Tomorrow, Mike Walsh, told the 2017 Financial Planning Association Professionals Congress that sweeping technological change driven by complex algorithms is nothing to fear as it’s simply “not unique.”

Walsh said financial planners’ fear-based thinking that technology will replace jobs must shift to ask how will jobs need to change.

India

YES Bank diversifies funding sources (The Asset), Rated: AAA

INDIA’s fifth-largest private sector bank, YES Bank, is raising a total of US$400 million in two transactions in the offshore syndicated loan markets as it further diversifies its funding sources.

The first transaction is a five-year loan amounting to US$250 million raised from a group of Taiwanese banks, led by CTBC Bank, Bank of Taiwan, Mega International Commercial Bank and Land Bank of Taiwan. The deal was upsized from the initial target of US$200 million as YES Bank exercised the green shoe option following an oversubscription of US$355 million from 13 other banks.

BankBazaar CEO Honored at India FinTech Awards 2017 (Finovate), Rated: B

Adhil Shetty, CEO of BankBazaar, was recognized by the India FinTech Awards 2017 earlier this month. Shetty was named Fintech Leader of the Year at the event, which featured more than 200 attendees, more than 40 speakers, and 20 shortlisted startups from six countries.

Africa

Millennials happy to take financial advice from robots (IOL), Rated: AAA

Millennials are not only developing a healthy appetite for financial advice, they are also more likely to trust digital advice from automated investment services than older generations.

  • Results from the study showed that in Europe 32% of online adults between the ages of 18 and 37 say they “rely on financial advice from professionals”, compared with 29% of older generations.
  • At least two-thirds of US Millennials were willing to share personal data in order to obtain better service from their financial institution.
  • Only 38% of US Millennials are confident that a bank or credit union will offer them valuable financial advice, compared with 46% of their older counterparts.
Canada

Upcoming ICO for Global Migrants and Their Unbanked Families (Digital Journal), Rated: AAA

The migrant and their unbanked families in emerging and frontier markets have been suppressed for the longest time without any access to basic services, financial or otherwise. Approximately 2.4 billion people in poverty worldwide are often excluded from free movement or basic rights which often leads them to corruption and crime, including slavery, human trafficking and in extreme cases, death. Migrants far too often are denied basic financial tools.

LALA World (“LALA”) is a wholesome ecosystem for the unbanked, starting with the migrants and their families back home. The base of this ecosystem is the LALA Wallet platform. By creating a whole new peer-to-peer infrastructure, LALA aims to revolutionize the way individuals, small businesses and micro-entrepreneurs transact, make domestic and cross-border payments, borrow money and associated products like insurances, cards, wealth and other general banking products.

LALA World Products from their Ecosystem

LALA Transfer – A Peer-to-Peer local and global remittance backed by crypto as well as fiat.
LALA Bill Pay – Local and International bill payments for you and your family.
LALA Lends – Domestic and International peer-to-peer lending via crypto and fiat, individual and small businesses.
LALA Card – Crypto and Fiat card synced to your Wallet and usable at millions of PoS globally.
LALA Kit – Contains a mobile phone with pre-loaded LALA Wallet, LALA Insurance, LALA Card, partners’ products, etc.

ICO Pre-sale – Nov. 25-Dec. 15, 2017 (discounts available).
ICO – Jan. 5-Feb. 5, 2018

Authors:

George Popescu
Allen Taylor

Thursday April 13 2017, Daily News Digest

small business fintech lenders

News Comments Today’s main news: Small businesses hate fintech lenders more than big banks. All is not well in the world of student loans. UK equity crowdfunding investments set new record in March 2017. Lending Works registers 8.8M GBP in ISA since launch. Today’s main analysis:  VC funding report. Small biz lending approval rates. Today’s thought-provoking articles: Portfolio review – […]

small business fintech lenders

News Comments

United States

  • All is not well in the world of student loans. GP: “There are many parallels between credit crisis in general: investors wrong feel of safety is, I think, the main one. And in this case student debt can only be releaved in bankruptcy in very exceptional cases, in short, nearly never. So investors feel that student debt is safe. The same way as mortgages perhaps? I think we are far away from a crisis or bubble. However student debt is growing and questions have to be asked of where this is going and why. Brian from BlueElephant told me one day that any market that is being skewed by government intervention from its normal equilibrium should be avoided as the price doesn’t reflect the risk. Is the government skewing the student debt market? Certainly. I have no issue with the risk in the student debt market, I am worried about the price pressure from non-profit participants. ”  AT: “Lenders need to get better at judging risk and cutting down on defaults.”
  • Small biz lending approval rates. GP: “We now see for a few quarters an improvement in small bank’s approval rate for small business loans.”AT: “Small banks and institutional investors are doing better at approving loans than big banks and alt lenders. I wonder what this means. Could be a trust issue.”
  • Small businesses hate fintech lenders more than big banks. GP:”As a small business you have a choice to borrow money below 10% from a bank, a product you will not qualify for, or to borrow moey from MCAs and fintech at rates often above 20%, a product you will nearly always qualify for. Who do you have more? The people who have a great product they don’t want to sell to you or the ones who have an expensive product you have no choice but to buy? To me this is a huge issue for the SME fintech lending sector. This means that as soon as credit from any other institution is anywhere close to being competitive the small businesses will not use a fintech offering. The second question is why are fintechs ranked so low? My personal believe is that it’s due to the onerous terms fintech usually charge small businesses especially in comparison to banks.  “AT: “This is interesting. Significant is the fact that this data comes from successful applicants, not non-borrowers. Driving this data could be the varied nature of borrower profiles. Small banks are likely lending to prime borrowers whereas online lenders are heavily weighted toward sub-prime borrower who likely expect to be treated like prime borrowers and can’t get a loan from a bank. This requires further investigation.”
  • VC funding report Q1 2017. GP:”Unaccredited investors had no scalable legal way to invest in private stocks before. The money inventory for unaccredited investors is fixed or at best stable given the wage stagnation, and the small inflation. And I think crowdfunding also includes more entertainment thant the stock market with the benefit of often also receiving a product. “AT: “I think it’s interesting that fewer people in the U.S. are investing in stocks? Does that mean they are investing in crowdfunding asset classes?”
  • Elevate Credit not trading at elevated price. GP:” I would compare them to Yirendai more. “AT: “The comparison to Square is interesting.”
  • Should fintech startups buy banks? GP:”If you want a bank, there is rent, buy or build. These approaches are standard business questions. The real question is should you work with a bank or not. Why not an insurance company? Why not with another deposit taking structure that is not a bank? ”  AT: “I don’t see why not. The most likely targets would be community banks, if they can get there before the big banks swallow them up.”
  • Diversification 101 in MPL. AT: “Basic investing advice.”
  • Podcast: Economic analysis of real estate, Part 2.
  • Redfin vets raise pre-seed round, launch digital mortgage platform.
  • Opus releases new version of OpusNotes.

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United States

All is Not Well in the World of Student Loans (Lend Academy), Rated: AAA

It is clear that burdensome student debt is now holding many people back financially. Student loan debt now stands at a staggering $1.3 trillion (as of the end of 2016) an increase of 170 percent over the preceding 10 years. There are three contributing factors to this increase:

  1. More students are taking out loans.
  2. The loans are for larger amounts.
  3. Borrower repayments have slowed down.

Borrowers are now leaving school with over $30,000 in student loan debt and they are defaulting more. This is particularly true of those borrowers with balances of $100,000 or more. Over 20% of borrowers who left school in 2010 or 2011 owing that amount have already defaulted on this debt (a default means they are at least 270 days past due). That is an astonishingly bad default rate.

Small Biz Lending Approval Rates Improve at Institutional Investors and Small Banks, Stall at Big Banks in March 2017 (Biz2Credit), Rated: AAA

Loan approval rates at institutional investors and small banks improved in March 2017, according to the latest Biz2Credit Small Business Lending IndexTM, the monthly analysis of more than 1,000 small business loan applications on Biz2Credit.com. Big banks’ ($10 billion-plus in assets) loan approval were stagnant in the last month, but remained at an all-time Index high. Meanwhile, loan approval rates at credit unions and alternative lenders continues to falter.

Small businesses hate fintech lenders more than big banks (Financial Times), Rated: AAA

On Tuesday, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York released its 2016 small business credit survey, which gives us an idea of the experiences of over 10,000 firms across the US. As Matt highlighted yesterday, one of the things we learn from the research is that small business expectations doesn’t tell us much about the economy. But we also get some information on how small business owners view various sources of credit. The results for fintech startups, specifically online lenders, are not as great as you might expect:

So, the hype about streamlining processes and building better customer experiences is not all hype, though they do just slightly worse in terms of transparency.

But there is something going on with the cost of credit provided by online lenders, and the terms they demand. The survey defines ‘online lenders’ as “nonbank alternative and marketplace lenders, including Lending Club, OnDeck, CAN Capital, and PayPal Working Capital”, so there are potentially two things going on here.

One is that online lenders typically have a higher cost of capital than banks, and so they also charge higher interest rates, which is what drives the dissatisfaction. The second is that online lenders are targeting riskier businesses, who wouldn’t be able to borrow from a bank. That would suggest the higher level of dissatisfaction about repayment terms and interest rates arises from the fact they are lending to businesses that generally encounter high borrowing costs, no matter who they are borrowing from.

Venture Capital Funding Report Q1 2017 (CB Insights), Rated: AAA

US VC-backed companies saw $13.9B in total financing across 1,104 deals in Q1’17, up 15% and 2% from Q4’16, respectively.

While Asia saw an increase in unicorn births from Q4’16, North America remained flat with a total of 3 new unicorns. Notably, Europe has not seen a new VC-backed unicorn since the first quarter of 2016.

Source: Gallup

Elevate Credit: Not Trading At An Elevated Price (Seeking Alpha), Rated: A

The fintech has funded more than $4 billion in loans for 1.6 million customers by using machine learning to lower fraud scores while providing quick lending decisions based on data inputs for a high-risk borrowing group.

Revenues grew 34% to $580 million last year while operating income expanded to $48 million, up from $9 million in 2015. The fintech is still losing money; that typically is a large negative in the recent IPO market, though other offerings have rallied despite large losses.

In total, Elevate sold 14.26 million shares at $6.50 including the over allotment amount. The company raised about $81 million after fees.

The company has a fully diluted market cap of only $350 million using a share count of 41 million and nearly 4 million of outstanding stock options.

The reality is that Square had a very subdued IPO similar to Elevate Credit. The initial price range target was $11 to $13 while the actual offer price dipped to only $9, though Square jumped back to that original price range trading around $12 for most of the first month as a public company.

Should fintech startups buy banks? (Tearsheet), Rated: A

Banks buying startups isn’t anything new. But for financial tech startups, looking for scale at any cost, perhaps the solution would actually be to buy a bank, according to a growing number of observers and experts in the industry.

There are almost 6,000 FDIC-insured banking institutions in the U.S. as of the end of 2016 and 1,541 of them have less than $100 million in assets, including a sliver of failing banks that need saving. With average common equity around $12.5 million for a healthy bank of that size, a well-established startup could pay $25 million and get fully licensed to be deposit taking.

Part of the reason startups haven’t been able to scale, at least in the retail banking world, is that so-called innovations are usually just different ways for people to interface with their banks, while core banking transactions – deposits, loans, mortgages and payments – generally remain the same on the backend. In other words, there hasn’t truly been an Uber for banking, said Pascal Bouvier, a venture partner at Santander Innoventures. Most fintech startups operate at the thin outer layer of banking.

The valuation gap between fintech startups and banks makes it difficult to structure a deal, he said. Banks tend to be valued more through historical earnings and the price of tangible book value, whereas fintech startups, because of their perceived high growth potential, often tend to have higher earnings multiples.

Diversification 101 in Marketplace Lending (LendingClub), Rated: A

While loans are issued in amounts between $1,000 and $40,000, Notes can be purchased for as little as $25.

If you invested $2,500 in only one borrower and that borrower becomes late and the loan eventually charges off, you could potentially lose 100% of your total investment amount. If you invested $25 in 100 different borrowers your potential loss on any single Note would be limited to 1% of your total investment amount.

 

Episode 6 – Economic Analysis of Real Estate, Part 2 (RealCrowd), Rated: A

In this episode listeners will learn about:
– How rising household income impacts multifamily investments
– How property tax factors into decision making
– Where to access data on real estate markets
– What asset class RealSource is pursuing in this current economic climate 

Redfin Veterans Raise Pre-Seed Round and Launch Digital Mortgage Platform “Approved” (Yahoo! Finance), Rated: A

Approved launched its digital mortgage platform today, aimed at radically simplifying the home loan experience for lenders and borrowers nationwide. The company raised $1 Million in pre-seed funding led by Social Capital and Precursor Ventures to support the launch.

Lenders in the pilot saw an average 50% reduction in the time it took to get those documents.

Approved technology includes:

  • DocCast™: Automatically collect original bank statements, W2s, 1099s, 1040s and paystubs.
  • DocVision™ Camera Scanning: Allows borrowers to securely “scan” documents using their mobile devices.
  • White-labeled Dashboards: A delightful and frictionless platform for borrower and lender collaboration.
  • Digital Document Library: Support for all popular loan programs.

Opus releases new version of OpusNotes (Hedgeweek), Rated: B

Opus Fund Services, a provider of hedge fund administration services, has launched new release of the OpusNotes loan accounting platform for marketplace lending vehicles.

United Kingdom

Latest OFF3R Index Data Reveals Significant Increase in Equity Crowdfunding Investments in March 2017 (PR Web), Rated: AAA

This record breaking figure smashed the previous monthly high, set back in July 2015, by over £13 Million. This made March 2017 the most successful month for the total amount raised via equity crowdfunding platforms in the young life of the asset class in the UK.

According to the data from OFF3R, equity crowdfunding had a very strong finish to 2016 but had so far had a slow start to the year.

The data revealed that March 2017 was a strong month for the sector. Just over £300 Million was lent in March via the platforms that form the P2P element of the OFF3R Index, including Zopa, Ratesetter and Funding Circle. This was marginally higher than February’s data but slightly down from January’s year to date high.

Lending Works Announcement: £8.8 Million Has Been Invested In ISA Account Since February 2017 Launch (Crowdfund Insider), Rated: AAA

UK-based peer-to-peer lending platform Lending Works announced on Wednesday £8.8 million has been invested into the company’s Individual Savings Account (ISA) since its launch on February 8th.

Lending Works reported given that there are no limits on transfers of ISA funds accumulated in previous financial years, the largest individual investment to date within a Lending Works ISA stands at £154,190, while the average amount invested among the 815 ISA investors currently stands at £10,769.

Fintech founder: I would not set up in London today (Financial News), Rated: A

The founder of one of London’s best-known fintech startups has said that he would not choose London as a location to set up his business today, as he has “no idea what Brexit will mean”.

Taavet Hinrikus, the chief executive and co-founder of online FX service TransferWise, urged the UK government to quickly secure access to talent and trade with Europe in a post-Brexit world.

Funding Circle’s Desai: use P2P for monetary stimulus (P2P Finance News), Rated: A

UK POLICYMAKERS should start using peer-to-peer platforms to stimulate the economy, Funding Circle’s chief executive and co-founder Samir Desai said on Wednesday.

The head of the country’s third-largest business lender called on the government and the Bank of England to bypass the banking system and inject monetary stimulus via P2P platforms, capitalising on the direct access they provide to the real economy.

Boost Capital Secures New £15m Credit Line (Boost Capital Email), Rated: A

No end to Boost Capital’s growth spurt as the business funding specialist secures new £15m credit line to meet small business loan demand.

An extra £15m will now be available to UK small businesses, after alternative business lender Boost Capital secured a new credit line from American Investment Firm Atalaya Capital Management.

Ex-Aldermore director joins SME lending platform (Bridging and Commercial), Rated: B

SME lending platform Growth Street has announced the appointment of a new commercial director and general counsel.

Chris Weller will serve as commercial director, having formerly held the role at Aldermore Bank from 2013-14 before becoming sales director for invoice finance until 2015.

Meanwhile, general counsel April Nardulli joins from P2P platform RateSetter, having served as senior regulatory counsel, regulatory lawyer and interim compliance manager since her appointment in 2015.

European Union

Finbee Experiences – My Portfolio Review (P2P-Banking), Rated: AAA

A year has passed since I last wrote about the portfolio I built on Finbee. Currently I have invested 1,027 Euro in 35 loans. 32 are current (965 Euro), 2 are late (23 Euro) and one is in default (38 Euro), but rates for this loan are paid to me by Finbee’s compensation fund. The average interest rate of my loan parts is 31%.

My self calculated yield (XIRR) is 31.5%. This is the highest I achieved on any p2p lending marketplace over a longer duration of time. Calculating the result again, this time with assuming a full write-off of the defaulted loan gives a yield of 29.4%.

Why banks are reluctant to enter the roller coaster of FinTech (JAXenter), Rated: AAA

Blockchain, NFC, Peer to peer lending are just a few of the options traditional banking could have fully adopted. This would have had a tremendous impact on the way we exchange transactions, do business and live our lives. However, I cannot name a big bank that has jumped on the bandwagon and delivered a fully-fledged product in this area. Just the opposite — the stories I hear are, for example, about two of the top executives of BNP Paribas in Bulgaria leaving the company to start their own Peer to peer lending platform called Klear. Why didn’t they initiate this project inside the organization?

I think there are two factors causing this:

  • Internal factor: Company culture in the traditional banking
  • External factor: The public image of banks is all about security, while innovation relates to risk.

Usually, new banking products need a lot of IT involvement — for each new type of deposit/loan you need someone to implement tens of forms and wizards.

How to enable innovation in banking

We have a good example of consortium of banks coming up with a radical move to start a joint blockchain project. This way none of the big players risks their own reputation.

Another way to announce innovative projects is by strongly focusing on the physical design and digital UX of the innovation because, believe it or not, the mass client judges how reliable something is by the external look of it.

Former HSBC banker Lake joins fintech revolution (Financial News), Rated: B

Spencer Lake, a former HSBC banker who led the group’s global capital financing business, has joined a fintech firm that boasts the UK bank as one of its main clients.

Lake has been named vice-chairman of Fenergo, a Dublin-based firm that makes what it calls client lifecycle management software, according to a statement from the company on April 12.

International

How fintech startups are helping SMEs choose who they do business with (Daily Fintech), Rated: A

According to Xero, 38 percent of small business owners indicate late payments cause them to delay payments to their suppliers, while 15 percent claim this often sees them delaying wage payments to staff, along with other benefits.

62 percent of businesses would not survive more than three months if all invoices went unpaid, while nearly 25 percent wouldn’t last a month.

Xero’s Live Contacts, a partnership with the local arm of credit bureau Equifax (formerly Veda) is one such data driven solution. As part of a paid-up Xero subscription, businesses can now see a credit risk indicator against a contact in their database, helping them to better assess whether to do business or not, or even risk adjust payment terms.

At the other end of the data spectrum, CreditMonk in India allows businesses to add a review of a creditor’s payment behaviour via its platform.

Asia

SINGAPORE-based Marvelstone Capital, which is a data-driven asset management company, is planning to launch its robo advisor platform for family offices in Asia in the third quarter of this year.

According to Cho, the robo advisor platform is being developed with Singaporean fintech startup Smartfolios, which is focused on building next-generation advisory and thematic investment technologies. The robo advisor will be available on desktop and mobile for Marvelstone Capital’s clients.

To give an idea of the market size of family offices in Asia, Cho cites a report that says that overall, the billionaires in the Asian market have about US$400 billion of assets at their disposal, which equates to an average of about US$3.6 billion per individual, which in turn makes all of them potential clients of family office solutions or even owners of single family offices. (Source:

Cho explains that family offices with below US$1 billion assets under management are the underserved family offices.

He adds that second priority countries will be Korea, China, Taiwan and Japan and that the third priority will be emerging markets such as Myanmar and Vietnam.

30 Under 30 Asia 2017: The Top Young Venture Capitalists And Fintech Entrepreneurs (Forbes), Rated: AAA

Val Yap founded PolicyPal — a Singapore-based smartphone app that helps users never miss a premium by tracking all their insurance on one dashboard.

MoolahSense Adds Invoice Financing to List of Services (Crowdfund Insider), Rated: A

Singapore-based MoolahSense, a marketplace lending platform, has added invoice financing as a new product line. The new service will allow SMEs to access financing to address short-term capital needs of up to $15,000. For investors, a nominal interest rate of up to 12% may be earned. An invoice backed loan would mature in 15 to 90 days’ time and investors would be able to receive returns in a relatively shorter period of time.

Authors:

George Popescu
Allen Taylor

Tuesday March 21 2017, Daily News Digest

southeast asia fintech

News Comments Today’s main news: U.S. justice dept. seeks to restructure CFPB. LC increases borrower rates on riskiest loans. Goldman building robo-advisor. Funding Circle closes funding round, valued at $1B. Today’s main analysis: Southeast Asia Fintech deals hit new record. Today’s thought-provoking articles: Happy 1st birthday, Zopa Plus. First Lithuanian P2P lender. WeiyengX Fintech Review. United States U.S. justice department […]

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United States

Justice Department Fires Salvo at Consumer Watchdog (WSJ), Rated: AAA

The Trump administration took aim at a consumer finance regulator created after the 2008 financial crisis, backing a legal effort to have the structure of the Obama-era agency declared unconstitutional.

The Justice Department, now under Trump administration leadership, filed court papers on Friday opposing the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, an independent regulator, asking a federal appeals court to order the restructuring of the agency.

The CFPB is fighting to keep its current setup, which gives its director protection from political interference from the White House. The administration in February said that President Donald Trump believes the bureau as currently organized is unaccountable to the public.

The Justice Department said the CFPB’s structure creates separation-of-powers problems under the Constitution because the bureau director isn’t sufficiently answerable to the president.

Lending Club increases borrowing rates on riskiest loans (P2P Finance News), Rated: AAA

LENDING Club has made its largest borrowing rate increases on its riskiest loans, with further hikes expected in line with the US Federal Reserve.

The US peer-to-peer lender – the world’s largest with over £20bn of funds channelled to date – has increased the cost of borrowing most significantly for loans in the E, F and G grades, following interest rate hikes by the central bank.

Rival platform Prosper has increased borrowing rates at a “mild” pace in comparison and more evenly across risk grades, according US alternative lending research firm PeerIQ’s latest quarterly performance monitor.

Goldman building robo-adviser to give investment advice to the masses (Reuters), Rated: AAA

Goldman Sachs Group Inc (GS.N), known for advising the world’s richest and most powerful, is building a so-called robo-adviser geared to mass affluent customers, according to a job listing posted Monday on the bank’s website.

The robo platform would sit within the bank’s rapidly growing investment management division, according to the ad. The unit, which Goldman has been trying to build out in recent years to diversify its revenue, posted a record $1.38 trillion in assets under supervision at the end of 2016.

Goldman has for years grappled with how to tap into the mass affluent segment, broadly defined as those with less than $1 million in investable assets, without diluting the brand of its private wealth business which is considered a jewel within the bank, according to people familiar with the matter. Goldman’s U.S. private wealth business typically advises clients with an account size of around $50 million.

Citi FinTech CEO Yolande Piazza: We’re not too big to change (Tearsheet), Rated: A

You’ve been at Citi almost 30 years and now you’re leading Citi FinTech. How has “fintech” evolved?
There’s a common misconception that large banking organizations aren’t able to operate like a startup, that they don’t have that mentality, that they’re too big too change. The word fintech without a doubt applies to startups in the space but a lot of that is how you pull in these startup-type organizations with the big banks to create a set of financial services that are orientated to the customer.

What has that blend of different talent and experience done for your work culture?
We’ve spent a lot of time creating a nontraditional banking culture. We operate in a very agile manner with the product, development, design teams so they work together and are completely integrated. They do their work through stand-up meetings on a daily basis, we don’t have offices – I do not have an office, I sit on the floor. We celebrate failure – if someone makes a mistake they actually win prizes for sharing that, all they have to do is demonstrate they learned something from it – to really create an environment of creativity and ambition for the product and how we serve our product.

The Developer Hub also sort of brings those different talents together.
[The Developer Hub] actually covers 85 percent of the core services a customer performs. We wanted to expose many of our APIs to a much larger community, to be exposed to the services they’re working on and give them the opportunity to come to Citi to uncover and unveil where those hidden gems are, those additional opportunities.

Former Morgan Stanley COO Jim Rosenthal Joining OnDeck Board of Directors (PR Newswire), Rated: A

OnDeck® (NYSE: ONDK), the leader in online lending for small business, announced today that it will be adding Jim Rosenthal, the former chief operating officer of Morgan Stanley, to its board of directors, effective April 3, 2017.

During his tenure at Morgan Stanley, Rosenthal served in a variety of roles, including as COO of the company from 2011 to 2016 and as chairman and chief executive officer of Morgan Stanley’s approximately $130 billion national bank. In his role as COO, Mr. Rosenthal was responsible for overseeing firm-wide technology and operations, Morgan Stanley’s wealth management digital business, corporate strategy, re-engineering and expense management, technology company relations, and cybersecurity. He remains a senior advisor to Morgan Stanley.

Rosenthal has more than two decades of experience across a wide spectrum of financial services. He joined Morgan Stanley in March 2008 from the global real estate company, Tishman Speyer, where he served as chief financial officer. Prior to that, he worked at Lehman Brothers, serving as head of corporate strategy and execution and as a member of the firm’s management committee. Rosenthal began his career with McKinsey & Company, where he was a senior partner, specializing in financial institutions.

Podcast 94: Congressman Patrick McHenry (R-NC) (Lend Academy), Rated: A

In this podcast you will learn:

  • Why Congressman McHenry decided to enter politics.
  • The responsibilities of the House Financial Services Committee.
  • Why he is focused on fintech as part of his work in Congress.
  • Why entrepreneurship has been declining in small towns.
  • How fintech can help reverse this trend.
  • The legislation he is working on today to promote fintech innovation.
  • Details of his proposed Financial Services Innovation Act and why it is important.
  • Why fintech innovation has a decidedly British accent today.
  • Why regulators need to be pushed to adapt and change.
  • His thoughts on the OCC Fintech Charter and why he feels legislation will also be needed.
  • Where Congressman McHenry stands on the use of alternative data in lending.
  • What he thinks will be able to actually get done in the next four years regarding financial innovation.

Fintech banks and a rise in consumer authentication: Wepay’s Week in Payments (Wepay), Rated: B

Two developments, one in the US and one in the UK, signaled a potential shift in the banking world and Fintech.

Chris Skinner wrote about a new national bank charter in the US issued by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency which opens the way for all kinds of organizations to try to set up banks, including big consumer brands like Walmart and Apple. Essentially they have just shown the way for these kinds of organizations (as well as payments companies like Square, WePay or Stripe) to apply for a banking license.

Meanwhile in the UK, Forbes writes about the launch of ClearBank, the first new clearing bank in the UK in over 250 years.

PYMNTS.com also has a research report out about how mobile technology may be able to help financial institutions with their AML (anti-money laundering) solutions.

United Kingdom

Funding Circle close further funding round, valued at billion (the investment observer), Rated: AAA

Investor interest in the peer-to-peer lending industry shows no sign of slowing; British site Funding Circle have just closed another round of funding, taking their total raise to $300 million.

Funding Circle recently closed another round of venture capital funding to the tune of $150 million, valuing the company at $1 billion. The new round was led by DST Global, BlackRock, and Temasek, a fund backed by the Singaporean government.

Happy 1st birthday Plus! (Zopa), Rated: AAA

A year to the month after we launched Plus, our higher return and higher risk investment offering, investors have lent out more than £100 million. That’s nearly 9,000 people investing on average £12,000.

Plus is performing in line with expectations. Individual investors will have different individual experiences, however, 73% of investors invested for an average of at least 6 months, with no loan sales, have achieved actual returns of at least 6% to date.

Classic cars, booze and planes: FCA gives investors in HNW Lending tax-free status (City A.M.), Rated: A

A peer-to-peer lender offering a high-net-worth pawnbroking service has been given the green light by regulators to market a specialist type of Isa to investors.

National IFA moves £253m to DFM after suitability review (Citywire), Rated: A

AIM-listed IFA Frenkel Topping has completed a suitability review which has seen £253 million of client assets transferred to its own in-house discretionary fund management (DFM) offering.

In May last year the national advice firm received discretionary permission from the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), meaning it could transfer clients to its new investment company which acts as a DFM.

This review has seen £253 million of clients assets transferred to its in-house offering. The firm had £745 million of assets under advice at the end of 2016.

Lack of education hampering efforts to deliver more homes (Development Finance Today), Rated: A

It’s no secret that we aren’t building enough homes in this country.

There are a host of reasons for this, from an over reliance on large builders to a paucity of funding. The second-class status of property SMEs – compared to SMEs in other industries – is also a huge rod for housebuilders’ backs, and it’s an issue LendInvest has been keen to highlight.

But there is also a fundamental issue – often overlooked – which is serving to hamper efforts to deliver more homes. To quote Tony Blair: education, education, education.

That’s why last year LendInvest launched the Developer Academy, a two-day course for those with some property experience allowing them to hear from – and build contacts with – experts across everything from planning permission to marketing the finished properties. We have now held two separate academies in London, with further sessions planned this year: four in London and four across the regions. So far 50 prospective developers have benefitted from these courses.

European Union

First P2P Business Lender launches in Lithuania on Madiston’s Peer to Peer Lending software platform (PRWeb), Rated: AAA

With limited access to funding, small businesses in Lithuania have struggled to expand, limiting the growth of the economy. Recognising this, the Lithuanian government recently established the legislation needed to allow Peer to Peer Lenders to provide business finance loans and FinBee played an active role in its development.

Laimonas Noreika, CEO of FinBee, explained: “We were delighted to be the first P2P platform to receive our licence to help small businesses borrow to finance their growth. Our technology helped us to achieve this. When we first launched consumer lending, we chose Madiston’s software because it was ready to go with what we needed but also gave us the ability to add functionality as we grow. The first step in our expansion plan was to add business lending and the technology was there for us, Madiston has been a supportive partner throughout.”

Fintech And France’s Post-Brexit Allure (Forbes), Rated: A

It was announced today that Article 50 will be triggered on March 29th. I recently wrote about Berlin’s potential to become fintech capital of the world after Brexit, but with French officials in London scouting finance and technology companies, Paris could become the hotspot for startups.

Without passporting rights, many businesses may have to set up subsidiaries in other European countries, which is why last month, French senior lobbyists and politicians started to woo companies in the same way Nasrou is, according to Business Insider.

At the start of this year, French digital minister Axelle Lemaire did the same and in a recent interview with Business Insider, she highlighted how although British startup investment fell, investment in French technology has soared by 71% from January to September in 2016. “In the third quarter of 2016 alone, funding obtained by French startups reached €857 million ($921 million), double the amount invested in Germany and almost equaling the €919 million ($988 million) invested in the UK,” Lemaire said.

French fintech Lemon Way is going after Stripe in the e-commerce payments arena with the launch of the payments service across France, Germany, Spain, Italy and the Benelux region.

Real time electronic payments provider ACI Worldwide also announced at the end of last month that French company PSP would be targeting the SME market with the ACI PAY.ON Payments Gateway, with the goal of expanding internationally.

It is important to note how interesting all of this action is being taken so close to the time Brexit was in the process of being triggered.

Australia

New deal brings more technology to financial planners (Money Management), Rated: A

Financial compliance education and training programmes provider, Mentor Education has entered into an alliance with Suitebox in order to help financial planners become more ‘tech savvy’.

Stage 3 would provide an education portal available to students, the financial planning community and educators to promote and engage the development of new initiatives in financial services education.

China

WeiyengX Fintech Review (Crowdfund Insider), Rated: AAA

The highlights of the press conference included:

  • The central bank highly encourages and supports the development of Fintech. At the press conference, Governor Zhou Xiaochuan stressed that China has made great achievements on financial technology, and the central bank was actively working on digital currency and new technologies such as blockchain, which would promote the development of the whole finance market.

In particular, he emphasized that the development of technology would boost the payment industry by providing more payment channels.

UnionPay Launches Blockchain-Based Credit Integration and Sharing System

On March 8, China UnionPay Data Services and Gingkoo jointly launched a blockchain based credit integration and sharing system.

The system uses blockchain technology to improve inter-bank credit card points management, and it enables clients to redeem points across banks.

The system is built on Gingkoo’s Xingchain, which replaces the original credit card points management system.

CBRC to Regulate Micro-Credit Companies

China Banking Regulatory Commission (CBRC) is formulating new regulations to strengthen the supervision towards micro-credit companies.

NEXTDATA raises $10 million in Series A Funding from multiple investors

Big data company NEXTDATA has raised $10 million in Series A funding from Shunwei Capital, Crystal Stream Capital, Baidu Ventures. Previous investor 360.com also invested in this round.

The founder of NEXTDATA Tang Huijun said the fund would be used for product development, technological innovation, market development and talent introduction.

Auto Fintech Platform Daikuan Raises 20 Billion Yuan from Zhongtai Securities

On March 8, Auto Fintech platform Daikuan.com and Zhongtai Securities reached a strategic partnership. The two sides signed a strategic framework agreement involving 20 billion yuan, and they would jointly develop a batch of financing projects as asset securitization, bond issues, and structural financing.

Asia

Southeast Asia Fintech Deals Hit A New Record (CB Insights), Rated: AAA

In 2016, 831 investments went to VC-backed fintech startups, only slightly down from 2015′s record of 848 investments. And while overall investment pace slowed last year, Southeast Asia saw the greatest number of fintech deals to the region to-date.

Deals to venture-backed fintech companies in Southeast Asia — specifically Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam — rose 29% last year, from 55 in 2015 to 71 in 2016. Meanwhile, dollars fell 12%, from $177M in 2015 to $158M in 2016 as deal growth was largely driven by seed/angel stage investments.

In terms of funding dollars, 2016 averaged about $40M per quarter, down from $44M in 2015. The largest deal of 2016 went to Vietnam-based mobile payments platform MoMo, in a $28M Series B that included Goldman Sachs and Standard Chartered as investors. Other deals included a $17.5M investment to Thailand-based payments enabler Omise, a $2M investment to Singapore payments provide Coda Payments, and a $3M investment to Malaysia-based financial comparison startup Jirnexu.

 

Looking at deal share by country, over half of all Southeast Asian fintech deals went to Singapore-based companies, which is not especially surprising given the city-state’s position as a global financial hub.

Funding Societies, a P2P lending platform for small and medium enterprises, received one of the country’s larger 2016 rounds: a Q3’16 $7.5M Series A that included Sequoia Capital India and Alpha JWC Ventures as investors.

After Singapore, the Philippines took the next greatest share of deals at 14%.

 

Bank Negara to seek fintech ideas from the public (The Star), Rated: A

Bank Negara Malaysia plans to engage the public to get their ideas or wish list on what aspects of the financial services that can be improved using technology.

The bank’s Financial Technology Enabler Group (FTEG) chairman Aznan Abdul Aziz said it was initiating a call for participation known as “Fintech Hacks”.

Last year, Bank Negara issued the Financial Technology Regulatory Sandbox Framework for financial institutions and fintech players to experiment with new solutions in a live, contained environment within specified parameters and timeframes. The framework came into effect on Oct 18, 2016.

Africa

CiTi, FinTech Circle to launch ‘FinTech Academy Africa’ in SA (Ventureburn), Rated: A

The FinTech Academy Africa, a joint initiative by FinTech Circle and Cape Innovation and Technology Initiative (CiTi), will set to launch in SA on 24 and 25 April, in Johannesburg.

The academy is geared toward CEOs and the like who have a limited amount of time on their hands, but who still would like a deeper understanding of best practices in fintech.

Authors:

George Popescu
Allen Taylor

August 10th 2016, Daily News Digest

August 10th 2016, Daily News Digest

News Comments Today’s most interesting article are FT’s report on Lending Club’s Q2 results and a few articles on new regulations, policy and VPC’s fund and strategy in the UK section. Today’s good news: CUneXus raised $5 mil. Congratulations ! United States One of the most interesting articles on Lending Club’s Q2 results, thought through, and with […]

August 10th 2016, Daily News Digest

News Comments

United States

United Kingdom

European Union

India

Singapore

 

United States

Lending Club’s latest results tell us a lot about the online credit business model, (FT Alphaville), Rated: AAA

Lending Club released its second-quarter results yesterday. Besides the updates on repairs after its scandals earlier in the year, executives provided an insight into some broader shifts that have been bubbling under the surface for some time.

Total originations in the second quarter were $1.96 billion an increase of 2% compared to last year. The slower origination growth was due to the slowdown in investor capital that occurred post May 9. Roughly 51% of the second quarter volume was originated prior to May 9, which represented 42% of the quarter in terms of calendar days.

You can file that under statements that are meant to re-assure but reveal trends that may or may not be worrying depending on your perspective. If you take the bait, and do the maths, you find that even without the slowdown post May 9 — the date founder Renaud Laplanche left the company — Lending Club was on track for year-on-year origination growth of 46 per cent for the quarter.

That compares with y-o-y growth of 68 per cent in the first quarter, 82 per cent in the fourth quarter last year, 92 per cent in the third quarter last year and 90 per cent in the second quarter of 2015. If you assume that Lending Club’s originations would have continued at the same pace after May 9, instead of accelerating, for example, then it seems that the company’s loan growth has been slowing quarter-on-quarter for a little while.

If you take the view that very fast loan growth is desirable, then this is a bad thing. But if you think that numbers like 90 per cent don’t belong in conversations about loan growth, then it’s a good thing. Jaidev Janardana, chief executive of Zopa, told us recently that volume is “a bad metric to be worried about”.

After Brexit, the online lender began rejecting the least credit-worthy customers who would have previously received a loan and assuming a higher level of risk for customers it accepted, which resulted in a higher cost of borrowing for those people. All else equal, the changes had the effect of shaving 10 per cent off its volumes. “We should make the right lending decisions and if that means we are going to grow slower for a period of time, so be it,” said Janardana.

You can see similar things happening at Lending Club, for different reasons, as per this slide from the second quarter investor presentation:

The first thing to note there is the population reduction in the lowest rated loans.

“As this recovery gets longer, credit has become more available and these individuals in particular have shown a propensity to be building debt kind of coming into the loan and then continuing to accumulate debt after the LendingClub loan as opposed to leveraging the loan to kind of pay off their debt.”

He’s basically saying that subprime borrowers have been coming to Lending Club for easy credit, rather than debt consolidation.

The second thing to note from the slide above is the interest rate hikes.

Those two bars in the middle show how the investor base changed after the scandal. In particular, banks who were previously buying Lending Club’s loans seem to have fled in larger numbers than any other category (though, obviously, the figures in the chart are percentages rather than absolute numbers).

Sanborn talked about this on the call too, in effect providing a hierarchy of funding sources. First, he noted the “self-managed retail investors who proved to be the most resilient”. Then he talked about managed accounts, which includes funds set up to invest in Lending Club’s loans. They “initially paused” but after being paid to buy loans — “incentives,” as Lending Club calls them — many returned.

Then we get to “asset managers, insurance companies, hedge funds and securitization investors”. They “experienced a significant pause”, which is a rather passive way to say they got scared off by a major scandal involving the former chief executive. Asset managers and hedge funds, who were “the most responsive to incentives”, were the first large investors to resume buying, Sanborn said. (As a side note, “responsive to incentives” is a great bit of code to remember if you’re ever asking for a bribe.)

And finally, the banks, who have “more complex diligence and regulatory requirements”, are taking the longest to come back to Lending Club. Things on this front are likely to get tougher for online lenders. Late last month, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation invited comments on new proposals for how banks shouldmanage third-party lending relationships.

Online lenders like Lending Club are very unlike banks in a great number of ways, but the role their retail investors play seems awfully like the role that depositors play at banks. They both are the last line of defence and risk losing their money when it all goes wrong. In the case of a bank depositor, government insurance protects them up to a point. But if you’re a retail investor on Lending Club, you own promissory notesissued by the company rather than loans themselves, so all that protects you at present is the fact that Lending Club has no debt.

To close, here’s how much the mess that led to Renaud Laplanche’s departure cost the company (our emphasis):

GAAP net loss was $81.4 million for the second quarter of 2016, compared to a net loss of $4.1 million in the same period last year. The results for the second quarter of 2016 were negatively affected by a Goodwill impairment charge of $35.4 million related to the 2014 acquisition of Springstone, an increase in professional service fees of $14.9 million primarily due to matters identified in the board review previously announced, approximately $14.0 million in incentives paid to investors, and an increase in compensation related costs of $6.5 million associated with severance costs and a retention program.

With this Lending Club disclosure from May, shortly after Laplanche left (our emphasis again):

On May 11, 2016, the compensation committee of the board of directors approved incentive compensation packages and salary adjustments for certain named executive officers. Specifically, Carrie Dolan, the Company’s Chief Financial Officer, was granted $3.5 million in restricted stock units (RSUs), which vests quarterly over a four year period, and a $500 thousand cash award, payable twelve months from the grant date. The compensation committee also approved an increase to Ms. Dolan’s base salary to $400 thousand per year, with a 75 percent bonus target. John MacIlwaine and Sandeep Bhandari, the Company’s Chief Technology Officer and Chief Risk Officer, respectively, each received $500 thousand in RSUs, which fully vest twelve months from the grant date, and a $500 thousand cash award, payable twelve months from the grant date.

Here is the Q2 Earnings Deck for Lending Club, (Crowdfund Insider), Rated: AAA

Here is the deck.

Sanborn put an upbeat spin on the results stating they were “confident on their future”. [Comment: the moment when the CEO is anything less than upbeat it’s time to jump ship. So no surprise here. A CEO being upbeat is what I would say “business as usual”. ]

An interesting factoid shared on the call. The Board Review, initiated following the shocking departure of former CEO Renaud Laplanche, cost the company (and thus investors) $13 million.

 

CUneXus Closes $ 5 Million Series A, (Finovate), Rated: A

CUneXus, creator of sales and marketing automation solutions for lenders, quietly closed a $5 million funding round late last week. Two investors contributed to the round; both prefer to remain anonymous.

The California-based company’s total raised is now $7 million. Regarding plans for the funding, CUneXus president & CEO Dave Buerger said, “The use of funds is twofold: (1) aggressive growth and the addition of key personnel, and (2) continuous product development and improvement.”

Since launching in 2011, CUneXus has built a host of solutions for online and mobile lending and cross-selling. At FinovateSpring 2016 the company announced its recent partnership with Edmunds.com and showed off AutoXpress, a vehicle purchasing experience that takes place completely online or on mobile.

Lending Club looks for reprieve in year of bad news, (SiliconBeat), Rated: A

Comment: this is yesterday’s news, literally. As I explained yesterday, I believe the Q2 numbers for Lending Club are actually really good given the circumstances. The journalist here focuses on the profit and loss line item which is not at all a good indicator of Lending Club’s business at this time. 

The latest black eye for Lending Club came late Monday, when the company reported a second-quarter loss that ballooned from a year ago due to a big drop in loan volume. Lending Club said it lost $81.4 million, or 21 cents a share, on revenue of $103.4 million, compared with a loss of $4.1 million, or a penny a share, on $97 million in sales a year ago. Excluding one-time items, Lending Club lost 9 cents a share.

Those results fell short of the estimates of analysts surveyed by Thomson Reuters, who forecast Lending Club to lose 2 cents a share on $100.5 million in revenue. Lending Club said one of the main factors in its results falling short was that its loan volume, or the value of the loans it handled during the quarter, fell by 30 percent from a year ago to $1.96 billion. The company also said its loan volume would be flat for the rest of the year.

There was also another shake up in Lending Club’s executive ranks, as the company announced the departure of Chief Financial Officer Carrie Dolan. Dolan’s departure comes about three months after Lending Club founder Renaud Laplanche was forced to resign amid a scandal involving loans that were made against the instructions of an investor, as well as Laplanche and his family members improperly using the Lending Club platform to take out multiple loans in late 2009.

Loan originations rose 41 percent from a year ago, to $589.7 million, which Jefferson Harralson, of Keefe, Bruyette & Woods said became “more optimistic” and could offset some of the recent worries about Lending Club’s business.

PYMNTS Daily Data Dive: OnDeck Is On Track With Q2 Earnings, (PYMNTS), Rated: A

The company has altered its business model and is taking on more loans in the balance sheet. Credit performance has improved, which has increased the provision for loan losses. The company is advancing its international expansion, its partnership with JPMorgan and expects gross revenue between $73 million and $76 million in Q3.

Here are the numbers:

$69.5 million | OnDeck’s revenue, which was a year-on-year increase of 9.8 percent and $1.6 million over analyst expectations

$32 million | Provision for loan losses, almost twice the $15.5 seen this time last year

47% | The year-on-year growth in loans under management, reaching $1 billion

41% | The year-on-year growth in originations, which reached $590 million

$0.20 | Net loss per share; projections were for a net loss of $0.24 per share

Marketplace lending technology patents held invalid, (Lexology), Rated: A

On July 25, 2016, three appellate judges in the United States held that a popular online marketplace lender’s patents were invalid because they merely reflected an “abstract idea” that is not entitled to be patented or otherwise eligible for exclusive protection under American intellectual-property laws.

The judges from the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals likened the claimed inventions to a “fundamental economic concept” (i.e., an abstract idea) that served as the basis for the consumer-loan industry. They ruled that simply implementing this concept with “generic technology” to automate the process does not then make it patentable.

To read the full opinion of the Federal Circuit panel, click here.

Peer-to-peer Lending Market to Grow at CAGR of 53.06% to 2020, (News Maker), Rated: A

Comment: This is a report that is being sold. This report 1st came out about 2 weeks ago. Just a reminder. If Lending Club can still grow year-over-year despite all the problems I don’t think anybody doubts that p2p lending could very well grow at 53% CAGR for the next 4 years.

Research analysts forecast the global P2P lending market to grow at a CAGR of 53.06% during the period 2016-2020.

Browse full table of contents and data tables at

Credit unions can ‘up their game’ with the right digital lending partner, (CU Insight), Rated: A

Comment: This article is a bit of an advertisement for p2p-bank partnerships. I think it’s worth being clear and reminding the obvious to our readers: quite a few p2p lenders have such partnerships and they seem to function well.

The success of Lending Club and Prosper, despite recent setbacks, demonstrates to credit unions the opportunity to ‘up their game’ and become a part of this digital revolution. What’s more, your credit union can keep the loans on your balance sheet.

Your credit union is able to profitably fund and manage smaller dollar, unsecured loans at a fraction of the cost of manual and paper processes, often as low as $500 each.

What kind of Digital Lending Partner can help your credit union ‘up your game’ quickly? One that has proven success in digital lending, and:

  • Allows your credit union to use your underwriting controls and risk-rating standards
  • Keeps the loans on your balance sheet as earning assets
  • Accepts online applications by computer or mobile phone
  • Provides approvals in an instant, funds in just days
  • Monitors loans, deposit activity and credit information
  • Handles loan renewals
  • Provides proven safety in the cloud
United Kingdom

Britain counting on fintech for banking revolution, (Reuters), Rated: AAA

British banks, starting 2018,  will have to share customers’ data with third parties who can then show how much could be saved by using other lenders, the competition watchdog said on Tuesday. Under the new rules, banks will have to share a customer’s data with third parties, providing the customer agrees. The CMA will also require lenders to publish their maximum fee for unarranged overdrafts, which earn banks 1.2 billion pounds ($1.6 bln) a year.

New banks, consumer advocates and lawmakers, however, derided the plans as relying too much on people’s ability and willingness to use new technology.

The CMA believes setting a 2018 deadline will also boost the “fintech” sector, which uses technology to make financial services cheaper and more efficient.

The government wants to see fintech grow, but European Union countries like Germany would like to lure the sector from London after Britain voted to leave the bloc.

Only 3 percent of consumers and 4 percent of business customers change banks in any year due to inertia.

Andrew Tyrie, chair of parliament’s Treasury Select Committee which has pushed for six years to get more competition in banking, said he was not optimistic the measures will get to the heart of the problem.

Land said the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), which capped payday loans’ interest rates, will review the overdraft measures and obstacles to new entrants to see if they improve, but Rishi Khosla, co-founder and CEO of OakNorth Bank, said this “passing of the buck” to other market watchdogs could put many fledgling companies at risk.

“The FCA should be prepared to step in with an industry-wide cap if they (the banks) do not significantly reduce the charges being paid by people who fall into difficulty,” said Money Advice Trust, a charity that helps people deal with debt.

The Financial Services Consumer Panel, which advises the FCA, said the measures rely on untested technology and consumers having to act on complex information. “At least it has given the FCA some good evidence to take on the banks.”

VPC Speciality Lending fund shifts strategy to greater balance sheet exposure after difficult Q2, (Alt Fi News), Rated: AAA

The key drivers of the recent shortfall, VPC says, was a cash drag from holding cash to cover currency hedges, and a peak in defaults, reflecting the life cycle of loans.

The portfolio is a combination of ‘marketplace’ and ‘balance sheet’ loans. Marketplace loans are originated by a platform, which earn an origination fee, with the fund lending directly to underlying borrowers targeting unlevered returns of 6 to 10 per cent, or 11 to 18 per cent on a levered basis. Balance sheet loans on the other hand are made to platforms with target returns of 11 to 16 per cent on an unlevered basis. The balance sheet loans are made through a special purpose vehicle [SPV] with the platform using the cash to originate loans.

At launch back in March 2015 balance sheet Loans were expected to be around  half of the portfolio, and currently represent 43 per cent of the invested portfolio. However, according to analysts at Numis Securities the management team at VPC believe that industry illiquidity has created attractive opportunities for balance sheet lending.

The VPC Speciality Lending Investment trust is looking to up its stake in balance sheet lending with profits from its marketplace loan holdings and move away from Funding Circle US’ exposure. More spare cash will be moved into balance sheet loans rather than marketplace loans in the VPC Speciality Lending investment trust, according to an update by the closed-ended fund’s management team.

The VPC Speciality Lending trust saw growth in its net asset value of just 0.33 per cent during the second quarter of 2016 on a total return basis, reflecting a 0.62 per cent loss in May.

According to AltFi Data, VPC Speciality Lending had outerperformed the broader UK marketplace lending space, as measured by the Liberum AltFi Returns index (the LARI) since its launch back in March 2015 until recently.

While the fund’s Q2 numbers are “below expectations”, VPC says long-term returns should be in their target range. The higher than expected losses, they add, came from the Funding Circle US loans which substantially underperformed expectations while the balance sheet loans in the portfolio experienced no setbacks and are generating coupons of between 12-16 per cent, with a weighted average coupon of 12.96  per cent

The trust is currently trading on a discount of 16.9 per cent. At launch in March 2015 it moves rapidly to a premium likes its peers in the space such P2P Global Investments. But, like its peers, it has also seen a substantial period at a double digit discount in 2016.

“We believe there is little scope for this discount to narrow until the fund consistently delivers monthly returns in line with its target. In addition, we believe the fund’s fees are high at 1 per cent of gross assets with a 15 per cent performance fee on net asset value [NAV] returns  [with] no hurdle.”

 

FCA Chief Told Parliament Committee Crowdfunding is Too Small to Be Systemically Important, (Crowdfund Insider), Rated: AAA

Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) Chief Executive Andrew Bailey basically gave a Parliament Treasury Committee a crash course on Crowdfunding 101 this past June.  The letter by Bailey was recently posted on the Treasury Committee website, along with a statement from Andrew Tyrie MP, Chairman of the Committee, who questioned “government subsidies”;

“On the basis of this correspondence, the risks associated with crowdfunding platforms appear to be restricted to those using the platforms to lend or invest. Government policies to promote the crowdfunding sector may have the right intention – to increase competition in the SME lending market – but government tax incentives, in effect government subsidies, may be encouraging some consumers into the use of inappropriate products. The FCA needs to be alert to these risks. The Government may need to reconsider these tax incentives.”

There is also an element of irony here. Internet finance is broadly recognized for its high degree of transparency. Old finance is known for its obfuscation and arcane operations – the source of too many systemic problems (how soon we forget the saga of LTCM). Many in the alternative finance sector believe Fintech is empowering finance to  come out from the shadow banking past and is better labeled as sunlight banking. It remains a truism that the best form of regulation is transparency.

Roche-Saunders explained a few days back it was clear that traditional finance sees “P2P encroaching on their space.”  Yet she was confident in the abilities of the FCA to draw the line at a point where competition is enabled and alternative finance can thrive. The FCA review process is accepting comments now with a deadline of September 8th.

FundingKnight to boost loan book after acquisition, (Bridging And Commercial), Rated: A

Gary Mealing, head of property lending at FundingKnight, explained to Bridging & Commercial that the company expects a large increase in activity after GLI Finance acquired its remaining shareholding.

FundingKnight’s origins and our skills are in commercial assessment, which means we’ll be focusing heavily on businesses with a property need and we’ll also have an appetite to fund over longer periods, also for larger amounts – up to £5m.

There has been a lot of focus around commercial property funds and the pressures from their investors to liquidate, and then there is the uncertainty so far with regards to the UK economic growth post-Brexit.

European Union

Interview – Finbee the First Year, (P2p Banking), Rated: A

More than 3,000 investors have issued 2M EUR worth of loans via FinBee and none of them lost any money due to a default and our compensation scheme. P2P lending is a relatively new concept in Lithuanian lending market, so raising awareness and overcoming scepticism was one the biggest challenges that we’ve faced from day one.

Current default figures are better that we expected and projected. We expected to operate with 8 to 10 percent of non-performing loans. Currently we have 2.25 percent (it worth noting that we consider a loan to be non-performing when two monthly instalments are missed, that is when loan is 60+ days late). We also project 40 percent recovery of non-performing loans. So we expect 4.8 – 6 percent losses after recovery. Having in mind that investors now invest on 26 percent interest rate on average, they can expect 20 percent returns even without our compensation fund.

What plans and goals do you have for FinBee for the next year?

Operations in Czech republic.

India

Raghuram Rajan sets agenda for rest of his term, (Live Mint), Rated: A

Reserve Bank of India (RBI) governor Raghuram Rajan set himself a crowded agenda in the last four weeks of his term as he left interest rates unchanged in his final monetary policy review on Tuesday.

On his agenda: guidelines for peer-to-peer (P2P) lending platforms and account aggregators, new norms to improve the functioning of corporate bond markets and tweaks to the marginal cost-based lending rate (MCLR) system, which Rajan hopes would improve the pass-through of past rate cuts by the central bank.

Singapore

Digital gold and silver may be up for P2P lending soon, (Asia One), Rated: B

(P2P) lending in Singapore could soon be extended to cryptocurrencies, if a unique partnership between vault operator Silver Bullion and a gold-backed digital currency seller is inked.

Silver Bullion, a gold and silver vault that offers peer-to-peer lending backed by those commodities, is in talks with Digix Global, a company that sells asset-backed tokens – or cryptocurrency bearing rights to gold – to use these tokens to borrow funds on the loan platform, the vault operator told The Business Times.

Several borrowers use the loan to buy more bullion with it, Mr Gregersen said. Lenders, on the other hand, use the interest to pay for storage on their own silver or gold stash.

Such loans are fully backed by physical gold and silver, and lending that stretches beyond six months has a collateral-to-loan value of at least 200 per cent. This means that a loan of S$100,000 must be backed by a collateral worth at least S$200,000. The exceptions are loans with a one-month tenure, which have a collateral-to-loan value of 160 per cent.

The discussion comes as Digix Global has moved to store gold bullion that is backing its cryptocurrency with Silver Bullion. They expect to store up to US$3 million worth of gold in Silver Bullion’s vault by the end of 2016. Digix Global will be transferring its gold holdings from Malca-Amit, at Singapore’s Le Freeport.

On Digix Global, users can buy Digix tokens, each of which represents one gram of gold.

Author:

George Popescu

August 10th 2016, Daily News Digest

August 10th 2016, Daily News Digest

News Comments Today’s most interesting article are FT’s report on Lending Club’s Q2 results and a few articles on new regulations, policy and VPC’s fund and strategy in the UK section. Today’s good news: CUneXus raised $5 mil. Congratulations ! United States One of the most interesting articles on Lending Club’s Q2 results, thought through, and with […]

August 10th 2016, Daily News Digest

News Comments

United States

United Kingdom

European Union

India

Singapore

 

United States

Lending Club’s latest results tell us a lot about the online credit business model, (FT Alphaville), Rated: AAA

Lending Club released its second-quarter results yesterday. Besides the updates on repairs after its scandals earlier in the year, executives provided an insight into some broader shifts that have been bubbling under the surface for some time.

Total originations in the second quarter were $1.96 billion an increase of 2% compared to last year. The slower origination growth was due to the slowdown in investor capital that occurred post May 9. Roughly 51% of the second quarter volume was originated prior to May 9, which represented 42% of the quarter in terms of calendar days.

You can file that under statements that are meant to re-assure but reveal trends that may or may not be worrying depending on your perspective. If you take the bait, and do the maths, you find that even without the slowdown post May 9 — the date founder Renaud Laplanche left the company — Lending Club was on track for year-on-year origination growth of 46 per cent for the quarter.

That compares with y-o-y growth of 68 per cent in the first quarter, 82 per cent in the fourth quarter last year, 92 per cent in the third quarter last year and 90 per cent in the second quarter of 2015. If you assume that Lending Club’s originations would have continued at the same pace after May 9, instead of accelerating, for example, then it seems that the company’s loan growth has been slowing quarter-on-quarter for a little while.

If you take the view that very fast loan growth is desirable, then this is a bad thing. But if you think that numbers like 90 per cent don’t belong in conversations about loan growth, then it’s a good thing. Jaidev Janardana, chief executive of Zopa, told us recently that volume is “a bad metric to be worried about”.

After Brexit, the online lender began rejecting the least credit-worthy customers who would have previously received a loan and assuming a higher level of risk for customers it accepted, which resulted in a higher cost of borrowing for those people. All else equal, the changes had the effect of shaving 10 per cent off its volumes. “We should make the right lending decisions and if that means we are going to grow slower for a period of time, so be it,” said Janardana.

You can see similar things happening at Lending Club, for different reasons, as per this slide from the second quarter investor presentation:

The first thing to note there is the population reduction in the lowest rated loans.

“As this recovery gets longer, credit has become more available and these individuals in particular have shown a propensity to be building debt kind of coming into the loan and then continuing to accumulate debt after the LendingClub loan as opposed to leveraging the loan to kind of pay off their debt.”

He’s basically saying that subprime borrowers have been coming to Lending Club for easy credit, rather than debt consolidation.

The second thing to note from the slide above is the interest rate hikes.

Those two bars in the middle show how the investor base changed after the scandal. In particular, banks who were previously buying Lending Club’s loans seem to have fled in larger numbers than any other category (though, obviously, the figures in the chart are percentages rather than absolute numbers).

Sanborn talked about this on the call too, in effect providing a hierarchy of funding sources. First, he noted the “self-managed retail investors who proved to be the most resilient”. Then he talked about managed accounts, which includes funds set up to invest in Lending Club’s loans. They “initially paused” but after being paid to buy loans — “incentives,” as Lending Club calls them — many returned.

Then we get to “asset managers, insurance companies, hedge funds and securitization investors”. They “experienced a significant pause”, which is a rather passive way to say they got scared off by a major scandal involving the former chief executive. Asset managers and hedge funds, who were “the most responsive to incentives”, were the first large investors to resume buying, Sanborn said. (As a side note, “responsive to incentives” is a great bit of code to remember if you’re ever asking for a bribe.)

And finally, the banks, who have “more complex diligence and regulatory requirements”, are taking the longest to come back to Lending Club. Things on this front are likely to get tougher for online lenders. Late last month, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation invited comments on new proposals for how banks shouldmanage third-party lending relationships.

Online lenders like Lending Club are very unlike banks in a great number of ways, but the role their retail investors play seems awfully like the role that depositors play at banks. They both are the last line of defence and risk losing their money when it all goes wrong. In the case of a bank depositor, government insurance protects them up to a point. But if you’re a retail investor on Lending Club, you own promissory notesissued by the company rather than loans themselves, so all that protects you at present is the fact that Lending Club has no debt.

To close, here’s how much the mess that led to Renaud Laplanche’s departure cost the company (our emphasis):

GAAP net loss was $81.4 million for the second quarter of 2016, compared to a net loss of $4.1 million in the same period last year. The results for the second quarter of 2016 were negatively affected by a Goodwill impairment charge of $35.4 million related to the 2014 acquisition of Springstone, an increase in professional service fees of $14.9 million primarily due to matters identified in the board review previously announced, approximately $14.0 million in incentives paid to investors, and an increase in compensation related costs of $6.5 million associated with severance costs and a retention program.

With this Lending Club disclosure from May, shortly after Laplanche left (our emphasis again):

On May 11, 2016, the compensation committee of the board of directors approved incentive compensation packages and salary adjustments for certain named executive officers. Specifically, Carrie Dolan, the Company’s Chief Financial Officer, was granted $3.5 million in restricted stock units (RSUs), which vests quarterly over a four year period, and a $500 thousand cash award, payable twelve months from the grant date. The compensation committee also approved an increase to Ms. Dolan’s base salary to $400 thousand per year, with a 75 percent bonus target. John MacIlwaine and Sandeep Bhandari, the Company’s Chief Technology Officer and Chief Risk Officer, respectively, each received $500 thousand in RSUs, which fully vest twelve months from the grant date, and a $500 thousand cash award, payable twelve months from the grant date.

Here is the Q2 Earnings Deck for Lending Club, (Crowdfund Insider), Rated: AAA

Here is the deck.

Sanborn put an upbeat spin on the results stating they were “confident on their future”. [Comment: the moment when the CEO is anything less than upbeat it’s time to jump ship. So no surprise here. A CEO being upbeat is what I would say “business as usual”. ]

An interesting factoid shared on the call. The Board Review, initiated following the shocking departure of former CEO Renaud Laplanche, cost the company (and thus investors) $13 million.

 

CUneXus Closes $ 5 Million Series A, (Finovate), Rated: A

CUneXus, creator of sales and marketing automation solutions for lenders, quietly closed a $5 million funding round late last week. Two investors contributed to the round; both prefer to remain anonymous.

The California-based company’s total raised is now $7 million. Regarding plans for the funding, CUneXus president & CEO Dave Buerger said, “The use of funds is twofold: (1) aggressive growth and the addition of key personnel, and (2) continuous product development and improvement.”

Since launching in 2011, CUneXus has built a host of solutions for online and mobile lending and cross-selling. At FinovateSpring 2016 the company announced its recent partnership with Edmunds.com and showed off AutoXpress, a vehicle purchasing experience that takes place completely online or on mobile.

Lending Club looks for reprieve in year of bad news, (SiliconBeat), Rated: A

Comment: this is yesterday’s news, literally. As I explained yesterday, I believe the Q2 numbers for Lending Club are actually really good given the circumstances. The journalist here focuses on the profit and loss line item which is not at all a good indicator of Lending Club’s business at this time. 

The latest black eye for Lending Club came late Monday, when the company reported a second-quarter loss that ballooned from a year ago due to a big drop in loan volume. Lending Club said it lost $81.4 million, or 21 cents a share, on revenue of $103.4 million, compared with a loss of $4.1 million, or a penny a share, on $97 million in sales a year ago. Excluding one-time items, Lending Club lost 9 cents a share.

Those results fell short of the estimates of analysts surveyed by Thomson Reuters, who forecast Lending Club to lose 2 cents a share on $100.5 million in revenue. Lending Club said one of the main factors in its results falling short was that its loan volume, or the value of the loans it handled during the quarter, fell by 30 percent from a year ago to $1.96 billion. The company also said its loan volume would be flat for the rest of the year.

There was also another shake up in Lending Club’s executive ranks, as the company announced the departure of Chief Financial Officer Carrie Dolan. Dolan’s departure comes about three months after Lending Club founder Renaud Laplanche was forced to resign amid a scandal involving loans that were made against the instructions of an investor, as well as Laplanche and his family members improperly using the Lending Club platform to take out multiple loans in late 2009.

Loan originations rose 41 percent from a year ago, to $589.7 million, which Jefferson Harralson, of Keefe, Bruyette & Woods said became “more optimistic” and could offset some of the recent worries about Lending Club’s business.

PYMNTS Daily Data Dive: OnDeck Is On Track With Q2 Earnings, (PYMNTS), Rated: A

The company has altered its business model and is taking on more loans in the balance sheet. Credit performance has improved, which has increased the provision for loan losses. The company is advancing its international expansion, its partnership with JPMorgan and expects gross revenue between $73 million and $76 million in Q3.

Here are the numbers:

$69.5 million | OnDeck’s revenue, which was a year-on-year increase of 9.8 percent and $1.6 million over analyst expectations

$32 million | Provision for loan losses, almost twice the $15.5 seen this time last year

47% | The year-on-year growth in loans under management, reaching $1 billion

41% | The year-on-year growth in originations, which reached $590 million

$0.20 | Net loss per share; projections were for a net loss of $0.24 per share

Marketplace lending technology patents held invalid, (Lexology), Rated: A

On July 25, 2016, three appellate judges in the United States held that a popular online marketplace lender’s patents were invalid because they merely reflected an “abstract idea” that is not entitled to be patented or otherwise eligible for exclusive protection under American intellectual-property laws.

The judges from the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals likened the claimed inventions to a “fundamental economic concept” (i.e., an abstract idea) that served as the basis for the consumer-loan industry. They ruled that simply implementing this concept with “generic technology” to automate the process does not then make it patentable.

To read the full opinion of the Federal Circuit panel, click here.

Peer-to-peer Lending Market to Grow at CAGR of 53.06% to 2020, (News Maker), Rated: A

Comment: This is a report that is being sold. This report 1st came out about 2 weeks ago. Just a reminder. If Lending Club can still grow year-over-year despite all the problems I don’t think anybody doubts that p2p lending could very well grow at 53% CAGR for the next 4 years.

Research analysts forecast the global P2P lending market to grow at a CAGR of 53.06% during the period 2016-2020.

Browse full table of contents and data tables at

Credit unions can ‘up their game’ with the right digital lending partner, (CU Insight), Rated: A

Comment: This article is a bit of an advertisement for p2p-bank partnerships. I think it’s worth being clear and reminding the obvious to our readers: quite a few p2p lenders have such partnerships and they seem to function well.

The success of Lending Club and Prosper, despite recent setbacks, demonstrates to credit unions the opportunity to ‘up their game’ and become a part of this digital revolution. What’s more, your credit union can keep the loans on your balance sheet.

Your credit union is able to profitably fund and manage smaller dollar, unsecured loans at a fraction of the cost of manual and paper processes, often as low as $500 each.

What kind of Digital Lending Partner can help your credit union ‘up your game’ quickly? One that has proven success in digital lending, and:

  • Allows your credit union to use your underwriting controls and risk-rating standards
  • Keeps the loans on your balance sheet as earning assets
  • Accepts online applications by computer or mobile phone
  • Provides approvals in an instant, funds in just days
  • Monitors loans, deposit activity and credit information
  • Handles loan renewals
  • Provides proven safety in the cloud
United Kingdom

Britain counting on fintech for banking revolution, (Reuters), Rated: AAA

British banks, starting 2018,  will have to share customers’ data with third parties who can then show how much could be saved by using other lenders, the competition watchdog said on Tuesday. Under the new rules, banks will have to share a customer’s data with third parties, providing the customer agrees. The CMA will also require lenders to publish their maximum fee for unarranged overdrafts, which earn banks 1.2 billion pounds ($1.6 bln) a year.

New banks, consumer advocates and lawmakers, however, derided the plans as relying too much on people’s ability and willingness to use new technology.

The CMA believes setting a 2018 deadline will also boost the “fintech” sector, which uses technology to make financial services cheaper and more efficient.

The government wants to see fintech grow, but European Union countries like Germany would like to lure the sector from London after Britain voted to leave the bloc.

Only 3 percent of consumers and 4 percent of business customers change banks in any year due to inertia.

Andrew Tyrie, chair of parliament’s Treasury Select Committee which has pushed for six years to get more competition in banking, said he was not optimistic the measures will get to the heart of the problem.

Land said the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), which capped payday loans’ interest rates, will review the overdraft measures and obstacles to new entrants to see if they improve, but Rishi Khosla, co-founder and CEO of OakNorth Bank, said this “passing of the buck” to other market watchdogs could put many fledgling companies at risk.

“The FCA should be prepared to step in with an industry-wide cap if they (the banks) do not significantly reduce the charges being paid by people who fall into difficulty,” said Money Advice Trust, a charity that helps people deal with debt.

The Financial Services Consumer Panel, which advises the FCA, said the measures rely on untested technology and consumers having to act on complex information. “At least it has given the FCA some good evidence to take on the banks.”

VPC Speciality Lending fund shifts strategy to greater balance sheet exposure after difficult Q2, (Alt Fi News), Rated: AAA

The key drivers of the recent shortfall, VPC says, was a cash drag from holding cash to cover currency hedges, and a peak in defaults, reflecting the life cycle of loans.

The portfolio is a combination of ‘marketplace’ and ‘balance sheet’ loans. Marketplace loans are originated by a platform, which earn an origination fee, with the fund lending directly to underlying borrowers targeting unlevered returns of 6 to 10 per cent, or 11 to 18 per cent on a levered basis. Balance sheet loans on the other hand are made to platforms with target returns of 11 to 16 per cent on an unlevered basis. The balance sheet loans are made through a special purpose vehicle [SPV] with the platform using the cash to originate loans.

At launch back in March 2015 balance sheet Loans were expected to be around  half of the portfolio, and currently represent 43 per cent of the invested portfolio. However, according to analysts at Numis Securities the management team at VPC believe that industry illiquidity has created attractive opportunities for balance sheet lending.

The VPC Speciality Lending Investment trust is looking to up its stake in balance sheet lending with profits from its marketplace loan holdings and move away from Funding Circle US’ exposure. More spare cash will be moved into balance sheet loans rather than marketplace loans in the VPC Speciality Lending investment trust, according to an update by the closed-ended fund’s management team.

The VPC Speciality Lending trust saw growth in its net asset value of just 0.33 per cent during the second quarter of 2016 on a total return basis, reflecting a 0.62 per cent loss in May.

According to AltFi Data, VPC Speciality Lending had outerperformed the broader UK marketplace lending space, as measured by the Liberum AltFi Returns index (the LARI) since its launch back in March 2015 until recently.

While the fund’s Q2 numbers are “below expectations”, VPC says long-term returns should be in their target range. The higher than expected losses, they add, came from the Funding Circle US loans which substantially underperformed expectations while the balance sheet loans in the portfolio experienced no setbacks and are generating coupons of between 12-16 per cent, with a weighted average coupon of 12.96  per cent

The trust is currently trading on a discount of 16.9 per cent. At launch in March 2015 it moves rapidly to a premium likes its peers in the space such P2P Global Investments. But, like its peers, it has also seen a substantial period at a double digit discount in 2016.

“We believe there is little scope for this discount to narrow until the fund consistently delivers monthly returns in line with its target. In addition, we believe the fund’s fees are high at 1 per cent of gross assets with a 15 per cent performance fee on net asset value [NAV] returns  [with] no hurdle.”

 

FCA Chief Told Parliament Committee Crowdfunding is Too Small to Be Systemically Important, (Crowdfund Insider), Rated: AAA

Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) Chief Executive Andrew Bailey basically gave a Parliament Treasury Committee a crash course on Crowdfunding 101 this past June.  The letter by Bailey was recently posted on the Treasury Committee website, along with a statement from Andrew Tyrie MP, Chairman of the Committee, who questioned “government subsidies”;

“On the basis of this correspondence, the risks associated with crowdfunding platforms appear to be restricted to those using the platforms to lend or invest. Government policies to promote the crowdfunding sector may have the right intention – to increase competition in the SME lending market – but government tax incentives, in effect government subsidies, may be encouraging some consumers into the use of inappropriate products. The FCA needs to be alert to these risks. The Government may need to reconsider these tax incentives.”

There is also an element of irony here. Internet finance is broadly recognized for its high degree of transparency. Old finance is known for its obfuscation and arcane operations – the source of too many systemic problems (how soon we forget the saga of LTCM). Many in the alternative finance sector believe Fintech is empowering finance to  come out from the shadow banking past and is better labeled as sunlight banking. It remains a truism that the best form of regulation is transparency.

Roche-Saunders explained a few days back it was clear that traditional finance sees “P2P encroaching on their space.”  Yet she was confident in the abilities of the FCA to draw the line at a point where competition is enabled and alternative finance can thrive. The FCA review process is accepting comments now with a deadline of September 8th.

FundingKnight to boost loan book after acquisition, (Bridging And Commercial), Rated: A

Gary Mealing, head of property lending at FundingKnight, explained to Bridging & Commercial that the company expects a large increase in activity after GLI Finance acquired its remaining shareholding.

FundingKnight’s origins and our skills are in commercial assessment, which means we’ll be focusing heavily on businesses with a property need and we’ll also have an appetite to fund over longer periods, also for larger amounts – up to £5m.

There has been a lot of focus around commercial property funds and the pressures from their investors to liquidate, and then there is the uncertainty so far with regards to the UK economic growth post-Brexit.

European Union

Interview – Finbee the First Year, (P2p Banking), Rated: A

More than 3,000 investors have issued 2M EUR worth of loans via FinBee and none of them lost any money due to a default and our compensation scheme. P2P lending is a relatively new concept in Lithuanian lending market, so raising awareness and overcoming scepticism was one the biggest challenges that we’ve faced from day one.

Current default figures are better that we expected and projected. We expected to operate with 8 to 10 percent of non-performing loans. Currently we have 2.25 percent (it worth noting that we consider a loan to be non-performing when two monthly instalments are missed, that is when loan is 60+ days late). We also project 40 percent recovery of non-performing loans. So we expect 4.8 – 6 percent losses after recovery. Having in mind that investors now invest on 26 percent interest rate on average, they can expect 20 percent returns even without our compensation fund.

What plans and goals do you have for FinBee for the next year?

Operations in Czech republic.

India

Raghuram Rajan sets agenda for rest of his term, (Live Mint), Rated: A

Reserve Bank of India (RBI) governor Raghuram Rajan set himself a crowded agenda in the last four weeks of his term as he left interest rates unchanged in his final monetary policy review on Tuesday.

On his agenda: guidelines for peer-to-peer (P2P) lending platforms and account aggregators, new norms to improve the functioning of corporate bond markets and tweaks to the marginal cost-based lending rate (MCLR) system, which Rajan hopes would improve the pass-through of past rate cuts by the central bank.

Singapore

Digital gold and silver may be up for P2P lending soon, (Asia One), Rated: B

(P2P) lending in Singapore could soon be extended to cryptocurrencies, if a unique partnership between vault operator Silver Bullion and a gold-backed digital currency seller is inked.

Silver Bullion, a gold and silver vault that offers peer-to-peer lending backed by those commodities, is in talks with Digix Global, a company that sells asset-backed tokens – or cryptocurrency bearing rights to gold – to use these tokens to borrow funds on the loan platform, the vault operator told The Business Times.

Several borrowers use the loan to buy more bullion with it, Mr Gregersen said. Lenders, on the other hand, use the interest to pay for storage on their own silver or gold stash.

Such loans are fully backed by physical gold and silver, and lending that stretches beyond six months has a collateral-to-loan value of at least 200 per cent. This means that a loan of S$100,000 must be backed by a collateral worth at least S$200,000. The exceptions are loans with a one-month tenure, which have a collateral-to-loan value of 160 per cent.

The discussion comes as Digix Global has moved to store gold bullion that is backing its cryptocurrency with Silver Bullion. They expect to store up to US$3 million worth of gold in Silver Bullion’s vault by the end of 2016. Digix Global will be transferring its gold holdings from Malca-Amit, at Singapore’s Le Freeport.

On Digix Global, users can buy Digix tokens, each of which represents one gram of gold.

Author:

George Popescu