In defence of Byron

Immigration laws are complicated and ugly things. In the case of the UK burger chain Byron, they are very complicated, and very ugly.

The company has come under heavy fire this week after reports that earlier this month, dozens of its staff were arrested by the immigration authorities on suspicion of working illegally.

When the news was broken by the Spanish newspaper El Ibérico, anger erupted at the private equity-backed company for how it cooperated with immigration officers. In the report, which cited an anonymous employee of the chain, Byron was accused of organising a fake training day to help facilitate the arrests. There are calls for a boycott of the company, which has 65 restaurants and was bought in 2013 for £100m by Hutton Collins.

Continue reading: In defence of Byron

Immigration laws are complicated and ugly things. In the case of the UK burger chain Byron, they are very complicated, and very ugly.

The company has come under heavy fire this week after reports that earlier this month, dozens of its staff were arrested by the immigration authorities on suspicion of working illegally.

When the news was broken by the Spanish newspaper El Ibérico, anger erupted at the private equity-backed company for how it cooperated with immigration officers. In the report, which cited an anonymous employee of the chain, Byron was accused of organising a fake training day to help facilitate the arrests. There are calls for a boycott of the company, which has 65 restaurants and was bought in 2013 for £100m by Hutton Collins.

Continue reading: In defence of Byron