Monday May 14 2018, Daily News Digest

Kabbage KABB 2017-1

News Comments Today’s main news: LendingTree to acquire Ovation Credit Services. Revolut to enter America. Flender delays UK launch. UK challenger banks test location-based P2P payments. Ant Financial raises $10B led by Carlyle Group. Today’s main analysis: KABB 2017-1 deep dive. Today’s thought-provoking articles: How the FTC knew LendingClub was allegedly hiding fees. Elevate’s Q2 earnings estimates. UK customers trust banks, […]

Kabbage KABB 2017-1

News Comments

United States

United Kingdom

China

European Union

International

Other

News Summary

United States

LendingTree, Inc. Announces Agreement to Acquire Ovation Credit Services (PR Newswire) Rated: AAA

LendingTree, Inc. (NASDAQ:  TREE) announced today that it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Ovation Credit Services, Inc., a provider of credit services with a strong customer service reputation. Ovation Credit Services utilizes a proprietary software application that facilitates the credit repair process and is integrated directly with certain credit bureaus while educating consumers on credit improvement via ongoing outreach with Ovation case advisors.

Europe’s New Fintech Unicorn, Revolut, Heads to America (Newsday) Rated: AAA

The London-based fintech start-up allows users to buy and trade cryptocurrencies, making it a direct competitor to the U.S.-based Robinhood. Revolut also sees itself as a disruptor of the traditional banking industry, as it offers checking accounts, peer-to-peer payments, and international money transfers, says Chad West, the company’s chief marketing officer.

FTC Doesn’t Hide Action Over LendingClub’s Allegedly Hidden Fees (Lexology) Rated: AAA

The FTC noted that the site did feature a small green dot (known as a tooltip) with a white question mark inside, which appeared next to the term “APR.” If a consumer clicked on the tooltip, a pop-up bubble appeared with a disclosure that read: “APR stands for Annual Percentage Rate and is a measure of the total cost of credit as an annual rate. The APR is comprised of the annual interest you pay at a rate of 6.99%—which is ultimately paid each month to the investors who enable your loan—and a one-time origination fee of 3.5% ($350.00) that is collected out of your loan proceeds.”

The complaint reminds lenders of the continued importance of accuracy and completeness in advertising and other marketing in order to avoid UDAAP claims, including under Section 5 of the FTC Act.

KABB 2017-1 Deep Dive (PeerIQ), Rated: AAA

The battle for transaction fee interchange revenue is heating up. Amazon is now encouraging smaller retailers to use its own payment processing system – Amazon Pay – in lieu of credit cards or PayPal.Amazon is willing to offer the payments at a discounted rate in exchange for growing market share and gain additional data insights from merchants.

FinTech Earnings – LendingClub and OnDeck

The market has responded well to LC’s earnings and the stock price has surged 17% post earnings.

Source: LendingClub

OnDeck’s stock price has enjoyed a 10% rise since earnings.

Source: OnDeck

Deal Deep Dive KABB 2017-1 Additional Notes

Kabbage is issuing $60 Mn in additional notes under the expandable option on its $550 Mn KABB 2017-1 deal. The additional notes classes A to D have balances of $44.4 Mn, $9.5 Mn, $3.2 Mn, and $2.9 Mn respectively. KBRA has rated the tranches A, BBB, BB, and B respectively. Kabbage issued $525 Mn in bonds originally on the KABB 2017-1 deal, and subsequently issued $25 Mn in additional notes.

KABB 2017-1 is passing all its triggers and has a weighted average yield of 42.9% and a 3-month average DQ percentage of 9.7%. The bonds are locked out from receiving principal for 36 months since issuance and the additional cashflow is used to purchase receivables that keep the weighted average receivables yield for the entire pool above 38% and individually yield at least 19%.

Source: PeerIQ, KBRA
Source: PeerIQ, KBRA

Q2 2018 Earnings Estimate for Elevate Credit (NYSE:ELVT) Issued By Jefferies Group (Macon Daily) Rated: AAA

Jefferies Group lifted their Q2 2018 earnings per share estimates for shares of Elevate Credit in a report released on Tuesday, May 1st, according to Zacks Investment Research. Jefferies Group analyst J. Hecht now forecasts that the company will earn $0.19 per share for the quarter, up from their previous estimate of $0.18. Jefferies Group also issued estimates for Elevate Credit’s FY2018 earnings at $0.83 EPS, Q1 2019 earnings at $0.37 EPS and FY2019 earnings at $1.09 EPS.

Source: Macon Daily

Renaud Laplanche: the sailor who revolutionised banking (Money Week) Rated: A

“Soft spoken and unfailingly polite”, as Forbes noted in 2015, Laplanche claimed, with some justification, to be “transforming” the banking industry – bypassing banks to link would-be borrowers with lenders online. He swiftly established his outfit as the market leader, originating some $20bn in loans and winning copious “disruptive innovator” awards. Then came the shipwreck.

He is now focused on “what can I learn from it, what can I do better. Upgrade has been part of that.” Last year, Upgrade raised $60m – “the biggest ever series A funding round for a US fintech start-up”, backed by “many of Lending Club’s original investors”. The market is now more crowded than ever, notes the Lending Times, and “margins have shrunk”. Still, many reckon that if anyone can steer a clear course it’s “the guy credited with creating the industry in the first place”.

 

 

 

PayPal CEO: A Cashless Society Is Possible as Mobile Payments Take Over (The Street) Rated: A

The world is rapidly digitizing. You look at every industry, whether it’s media publishing or entertainment and you are now seeing different value propositions being driven by software and mobile connectivity. Financial services is no different. I think you are going to see more changes in the financial services industry in the next five or 10 years than maybe we have seen in the last 25 or 30 years.

The world is rapidly digitizing. People are writing many less checks than they ever have before. Peer to peer lending, which once involved giving cash to a friend to split a bill at a restaurant, that’s now happening digitally.

The Most Well-Funded Tech Startup In Every US State (CB Insights), Rated: A

In our latest map of the most well-funded American tech startup in each state, some companies with the deepest pockets were found in Florida (Magic Leap, $1.89B), Virginia (OneWeb, $2.2B), Utah (Domo, $698M), and Illinois (Avant, $655M).

Source: CB Insights

Congress Votes to Erase Auto Loan Anti-Discrimination Rule (LendEDU) Rated: A

Under the authority granted by the Congressional Review Act, the House of Representatives passed a measure on May 8 to roll back an Obama-era rule on auto lending practices issued by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). It should be noted that the rollback pertains to a set of administrative guidelines issued by the CFPB, not a law ratified by Congress.

The House vote was 234-175, reversing a 2013 rule established by the CFPB to stop auto lenders from charging higher fees to borrowers based on their religion, sex, race, or age. The vote follows a Senate vote in April to also repeal this measure. It will now go to President Donald Trump’s desk for his approval.

Virginia Attorney General Files Suit Against Online Lender Alleging Predatory Lending (JD Supra) Rated: B

The complaint alleges that the lender, one of the largest online lenders in Virginia, operated without a Virginia license, and misled borrowers about its licensure status in another state in order to avoid Virginia’s 12% interest rate usury cap.  Virginia Code § 6.2-303.  Specifically, the complaint alleges that the installment loan agreements’ Utah choice-of-law provisions are void, and that Virginia law, including Virginia’s usury cap, applies to the loans.  The VA Attorney General also alleges that the lender attempted to collect on loans from borrowers who were in bankruptcy and entitled to protection from debt collection.

United Kingdom

Ireland’s Flender pushes back UK launch (Peer2Peer Finance) Rated: AAA

IRISH peer-to-peer lending platform Flender has pushed back its UK launch to focus on becoming the “dominant platform” in its home country first.

UK banks are trying out location-based P2P payments (Tearsheet) Rated: AAA

On Friday, Revolut introduced a feature called “Near Me” which lets its customers find other Revolut customers using the same feature and send them money without knowing their contact details. On Monday, Monzo rolled out a capability called “Nearby Friends.”

The use cases for location-based peer-to-peer payments among consumers may not be compelling enough for providers to consider it, said Paygility Advisors partner Deborah Baxley.

Q&A With Simon Taylor, 11:FS Co-Founder (Forbes) Rated: A

However, last month’s announcement that London FinTech Revolut is now a so-called unicorn with a $1.7 billion valuation and TransferWise working with the Bank of England and launching a ‘borderless’ card that drastically slashes transaction costs, the future for the city may be companies such as these.

Another fellow London FinTech 11:FS is also making waves offering a range of FinTech services, not least being able to ‘make a challenger bank in 12 weeks’. Here company Co-Founder Simon Taylor speaks exclusively to Forbes about what these moves and also on Swedish company iZettle’s recent IPO announcement.

 

 

A new study shows UK customers trust banks but don’t engage with them (Business Insider) Rated: AAA

UK banks were trusted by 40% of consumers in 2017, up from 29% in 2015, according to a study from Accenture. This makes banks only 3% less trusted than retailers, and ahead of insurers, independent advisers, and tech companies.

Source: Business Insider

Additionally, customer satisfaction was up 5% from 65% in 2015 to 70% in 2017, suggesting banks have been doing something right in terms of customer experience in the recent years. This also brings banks ahead of life insurers and pension providers, as well as on the same level as motor insurers and home insurers, when it comes to customer satisfaction.

 

P2P lenders benefit as BoE keeps interest rates low (AltFi News) Rated: A

The Bank of England’s decision to keep the interest rates at 0.5 per cent should at least make peer-to-peer lenders smile. People are tempted to look for alternative and riskier ways to increase the value of their savings, as inflation continues to hover above BoE’s target of two per cent and traditional savings accounts offer barely any interest at all.

Mike Allan, the director of operations at LendingCrowd, said that the historically lax monetary policy created an opening for P2P lending to take off.

Why commercial property could be the new buy-to-let and how to invest for better returns (This is Money) Rated: A

Over the past five or six years, investing in property through peer-to-peer and crowdfunding platforms has grown enormously in popularity. There are now lots of platforms to choose from and each offers a slightly different proposition.

Both peer-to-peer and crowdfunding platforms have different approaches, in that some allow you to put money in and spread it across a number of properties, or a portfolio run by them.

 

 

China

Jack Ma’s Ant Snags Carlyle for $ 10 Billion Funding, Sources Say (Bloomberg) Rated: AAA

Ant Financial, the Chinese payments giant controlled by Jack Ma, is expected to close a fundraising of at least $10 billion in the next few days, attracting Carlyle Group and the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board as first-time investors, according to people familiar with the matter.

The Hangzhou-based company is said to be valued at about $150 billion in this round, the people said, requesting not to be named because the matter is private. The funding will be mostly used for overseas expansion, the people said.

PBOC Bans Unauthorized APP to Access Credit Rating System (Crowdfund Insider) Rated: AAA

Recently, the People’s Bank of China (PBOC), China’s central bank, issued a document named, “Notice on Further Strengthening the Management of Credit Information Security” (Yinfa [2018] No. 102) (hereinafter referred to as “Document No. 102”), to further strengthen the management and security of credit information database. According to Document No. 102, credit reporting agencies and access agencies are strictly forbidden to query credit report without authorization, and unauthorized APP accessing to credit reporting systems is strictly prohibited. In addition, it is required to establish a leading group for credit information security work and make clear that the person in charge of the credit management work shall take the primary responsibility for related issue.

China’s online lenders reel from government clampdown (Nikkei Asian Review) Rated: A

Of 66 peer-to-peer lending platforms surveyed by FTCR, 10 said they might close because of difficulties in meeting new compliance standards and in controlling an increase in bad loans. Among the platforms, which match lenders with borrowers online, more than 40% of those in second- and third-tier cities said business had fallen in the first quarter compared with the end of last year.

P2P lending in China had grown rapidly, extending 2.8 trillion yuan ($443.3 billion) in 2017, equivalent to 20.7% of the amount lent by banks.

Antisocial networking (Breaking Views) Rated: A

A Chinese social network is finding new ways to lose friends. Renren has irked investors over plans to sell some of its assets, notably a stake in U.S. online lender SoFi, to a firm partly controlled by its chief executive.

Renren has been irritating shareholders for years. Since its initial public offering in New York in 2011 valuing it at close to $6 billion, the company has failed to live up to the hype of being China’s answer to Facebook. It is now worth just $600 million.

This latest episode also isn’t the first time boss Joe Chen has been accused of trying to enrich himself at the expense of shareholders. A non-binding 2015 bid to take Renren private for $1.4 billion never came to fruition, and the SoFi stake was a topic of dispute then, too.

European Union

Banco BNI Europa invests €15m in auto financing start-up Lendrock (Fintech Futures) Rated: AAA

Portuguese Banco BNI Europa will invest up to €15 million in Spain-based Lendrock’s online financing platform that specialises in near prime consumer auto financing.

The bank says the Iberian partnership begins with the acquisition of part of the existing loan portfolio, offering exposure to Lendrock’s loans and setting the stage for the acquisition of monthly origination volumes.

iZettle: From Swedish Fintech Success To Europe’s Biggest Fintech IPO (Forbes) Rated: AAA

Swedish fintech iZettle announced last week that they intend on selling shares and launching an IPO in order to raise SKr2bn by listing on Nasdaq Stockholm. With plans to increase revenue by 40 per cent a year, iZettle aims to also break even by 2020.

With JPMorgan and Carnegie on their side as joint global co-ordinators, iZettle would like to walk away with at least SKr10bn ($1.1 billion) by the end of this month or June.

 

International

The Top 100 Venture Capitalists (CB Insights), Rated: A

For the third year in a row, CB Insights partnered with The New York Times to provide an algorithmically-driven view into the question of who are the top VCs. Not swayed by narrative or a storied history in venture capital, the NYT-CBI rankings provide a current view into the best venture capitalists in the world at an individual and firm level.

Some of the top movers in 2018 include:

  • Steve Anderson of Baseline Ventures who moved from 10th place to 2nd due in part to a consistent knack for investing early in winners.  His stellar track record saw another success in recently public ecommerce company Stitch Fix.
  • And Rob Hayes of First Round Capital saw the most significant jump going from 85th to 7th for leading investments in Uberand Square.

First-time appearances on the ranking include Shawn Carolan of Menlo Ventures (investor in Roku), Meyer Malka of Ribbit Capital (investor in Credit Karma), and Albert Wenger of Union Square Ventures (investor in MongoDB).

Tech firms will be regulated like banks in future (The Finanser) Rated: A

First, we have become addicted to technology. We live our lives staring at our devices rather than talking to each other or watching where we are going.

Second is privacy. Facebook and other internet giants are abusing our privacy rights in order to generate ad revenues, as demonstrated by Cambridge Analytica, but they’re not the only one.

Third is that the power of these firms is too much. When six firms – Google (Alphabet), Amazon, Facebook, Tencent, Alibaba and Baidu – have almost all the information on all the citizens of the world held digitally, it creates a backlash and a fear.

 

Bitbond’s Loan Transfers Using Bitcoin Are Becoming More Popular (BTC Manager) Rated: A

Global peer to peer marketplace for small loans, Bitbond, allows clients the option to transfer their loans by using bitcoin. The bitcoin startup has seen its popularity grow, with the startup managing around $1 million in loans per month for 100 clients.

The revelation was made in an interview by Reuters TV with Bitbond’s German founder Radoslav Albrecht. He said the rationale behind the move is that it will help reduce the foreign exchange cost for clients.

The Benzinga Global Fintech Award Finalists For The Best Under-Banked Or Emerging Market Solution (Benzinga) Rated: B

The finalists for the Best Under-banked or Emerging Market Solution category are:

Airfox
Braviant Holdings
CreditStacks
Elevate Credit
Experian MicroAnalytics
Finn.ai
Humaniq
ID Finance
LenddoEFL
MoneyLion
Oakam
Self Lender, Inc.
Teller

Australia/New Zealand

Three disruptive forces driving Aussie neobanks like volt, as fintech startups get serious (Australian Financial Review) Rated: AAA

In a significant milestone for the local fintech scene, the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority said last week volt bank would become the first recipient of a “restricted license” under its new regime, created after the federal government indicated it wants to see more competition in banking.

Here come the robots: First digital financial advice gets green light (NZ Herald) Rated: A

Already under pressure from reputational challenges, New Zealand’s human financial advisor workforce will now have to go head to head with computer-generated advice.

KiwiSaver provider Kiwi Wealth has today received the green light to be the first to offer personalised digital financial advice and will launch the service to its KiwiSaver members next month.

Kiwi Wealth, which is owned by the Government, ACC and the New Zealand Superannuation Fund, and is a sister company to Kiwibank, is the first to gain an exemption from the Financial Markets Authority.

India

Deifying big data (Business Line) Rated: A

The fusion of big data with artificial intelligence is creating this beast called ‘data capitalism’

The world is shifting from finance to data-capitalism. The man with data is the king. Data-rich markets will destroy the existing order, money will no longer be in its pre-eminent position, labour markets will be uprooted and millions of jobs endangered, firms thrown out of business, and so on.

From solving habitual tasks to affordable interior designs – your startup fix to start the week (Your Story) Rated: A

The rules of investment have changed over the years, and peer-to-peer lending is being viewed as an investment avenue that is expected to give returns to the tune of 18-22 percent, according to industry estimates. Bengaluru-based Finzy is trying to tap on to just that. Amit More’s background in finance had him excited about the credit opportunity in India. He teamed up with Abhinanadan Sangam, and the duo chose to set shop in the ripe Indian digital lending market. Finzy was incorporated in October 2016 with Bridge FinTech Solutions Pvt Ltd as the parent company.

Asia

Keeping Loan Sharks Away From Indonesia’s Fintech Archipelago (Bloomberg) Rated: AAA

Indonesia is planning to tighten regulation of its vibrant financial technology sector, imposing new rules on companies which it hopes will stand at the forefront of efforts to extend services to more of the country’s 260 million people.

Peer-to-peer lending jumped 38 percent in the first two months of 2018 from a year earlier, hitting 3.5 trillion rupiah, and OJK director Eko Ariantoro said in March that regulators “don’t want these developing fintechs to become loan shark-like businesses.”

Asia news roundup: Didi responds to passenger killing, Flipkart founder exits, and more (Tech In Asia) Rated: B

Julo raises US$5 million in series A (Indonesia). The peer-to-peer lending startup received the funding in a round led by Skystar Capital and East Ventures. Participating investors included Convergence Ventures, Provident Capital, and Central Capital Ventura, among others.

Authors:

George Popescu
Allen Taylor

Monday May 8 2017, Daily News Digest

Lending Club expenses revenues

News Comments Today’s main news: Experian legislative update. P2P platforms predicted to shift to hybrid models. Millennials spend over 1/3 of take home pay on rent. WeChat Pay enters U.S.market. Today’s main analysis: Lending Club’s lost year (and a half). Alternative return metrics (Cash on Cash Returns). Today’s thought-provoking articles: Record number of banks want to partner with LC. Q1 […]

Lending Club expenses revenues

News Comments

United States

United Kingdom

China

European Union

International

Australia

India

MENA

News Summary

United States

Legislative Update 158 (Experian Email), Rated: AAA

Highlights this issue:

  • On April 14 the CFPB’s Office of Fair Lending and Equal Opportunity issued its annual report on fair lending. The report provides an overview of the work that the Bureau has done over the past year to provide oversight and enforcement of the fair lending laws under its jurisdiction.
  • In March, US Senate Banking Committee Chairman Mike Crapo (R-Idaho) and Ranking Member Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) announced that they were seeking legislative proposals to promote economic growth. Proposals were due to the Committee on Friday, April 14. Experian worked closely with the CDIA and Chamber of Commerce to ensure that our policy priorities were included in their letters. CDIA’s comment letter recommended that the Committee take up and pass CROA reform, credit score competition and legislation to cap class action damages under the FCRA.
  • On April 19, GAO released a report on fintech and marketplace lending. The report was intended to provide an overview of fintech, as well as the potential benefits and challenges for consumers and small businesses.
  • Texas, H.B. 2333 would require a business that accepts a credit card or debit card for payment and retains any data related to the card, other than a confirmation number, for the transaction, to secure the retained information against a breach of system security. If a breach of system security occurs in which credit card or debit card information is compromised, the business shall notify the attorney general within 24 hours.

See the full report here.

Lending Club’s Lost Year (And A Half) (Seeking Alpha), Rated: AAA

One year later, the question hangs in the air: Has Lending Club recovered?

Source: Lending Club & Seeking Alpha

Meanwhile, G&A expenses ballooned as the company increased spending in compliance, retention, and recruiting. Despite only releasing one product, relative engineering costs also increased significantly during the same period. The company spent $35M in non-adjusted engineering costs, an increase of $11.5M from a year prior. Why have costs expanded, even though the company hasn’t grown?

Following the Jefferies incident (and even in the months leading up to it), one of the concerns that was brought up in 2016 was regarding Lending Club’s underwriting, both in its efficacy and in its efficiency. Many institutions temporarily halted their investments on the platform during the second quarter to do more due diligence, specifically on the concern that additional loans may have had their details changed.

This issue was recognized in the first quarter of 2016, when Lending Club stated that it had begun eliminating high-risk populations from its credit policy. The company announced several more cuts to its underwriting throughout 2016, most recently eliminating another 6% of borrowers from its credit policy. Cumulatively, approximately 17% of borrowers who formerly qualified for loans were cut from the credit policy.

Source: Lending Club

Why is credit deteriorating? Lending Club noted these deteriorating credit trends early in 2017:

“Throughout 2016 and into 2017 we have continued to observe the same trends on the Lending Club platform: indicators suggest a strong U.S. economy, but some borrowers are not offering appropriate levels of risk adjusted return.”

The delinquency rates for grades D-G do seem to be flat/trending down over the course of 2016, but delinquency rates for 36-month loans grades A-C are flat/trending up over the same period.

While not a perfect corollary, S&P/Experian consumer credit default indices also show an increase in bank card defaults over the past six months, which suggests that the increasing level of charge-offs is not limited to Lending Club.

Source: Lending Club

Lending Club also noted that it is spending a significant amount more on in-house collection efforts. Servicing and Origination expenses increased $2M from 4Q 2016 to 1Q 2017.

Lending Club noted that, although its servicing portfolio balance only increased 8% year over year, the revenue collected on its servicing portfolio has increased 34%.

Source: Lending Club

If we tally up our score card, we have:

  1. Revenue has not recovered (but the company has guided investors to growth in 3Q and 4Q).
  2. Relative spend has increased in 3 out of 4 expense categories.
  3. Bad debts will continue to impact note investor portfolios while the 2016 vintages progress through their hazard curves, although there are signs that the increase in loan charge-offs is slowing down and/or reversing for high-risk borrowers.

Alternative Return Metrics: Cash on Cash Return (PeerIQ), Rated: AAA

As evidenced from Prosper’s annualized return calculation methodology, the return calculation can be complicated, involving several moving parts. Marketplace institutional investors appreciate the complexity and diversity of return calculations.  At PeerIQ, we have had numerous conversations in the past with our clients and developed the “Cash-on-Cash Return” metric as one of several tools to monitor portfolio performance.

It varies from Prosper’s Estimated IRR by only considering realized cashflow information. Unlike Annualized Return, it eliminates complication springing from annualizing simple returns. In short, CoCR utilizes few readily available loan and pool level data points and summarizes the historical return of the investment on monthly basis.

Source: PeerIQ
Source: PeerIQ

The disadvantage of the CoCR metric is that returns are not forward-looking. Also, the declining cash-on-cash return performance (a typical characteristic of installment loan portfolios) can create confusion or frustration for retail investors. Retail investors experience strong net annualized returns in the early periods, only to experience returns consistently decline as loans season.

Record Number of Banks Want to Partner with Lending Club (Bank Innovation), Rated: AAA

Banks made up a “record” 40% of the lender’s almost $2 billion originations for the quarter, up from 31% last quarter, according to Lending Club CEO Scott Sanborn.

Bank participation hit its lowest (for the past 12 months) in the third quarter of 2016 — 13% of the total $1.9 billion originations — and has been on a steady increase ever since.

Source: Lending Club

Online lenders feel the pinch (Crain’s Chicago Business), Rated: A

Data glitches are bad for any company. But they are especially terrible for online lenders that trumpet having high-quality data as a main selling point.

And now comes Prosper Marketplace, which said on Thursday that it told investors their returns were inflated because of a systems error. Annual returns for some investors were cut in half, while others declined by 2 percentage points or less.

For example, take a look at a recent securitization by Avant, the Chicago-based online lender that cut its staff by about 30 percent last year and whose loan default rates had been higher than expected. To attract investors to the nearly $220 million deal, Avant had to materially improve the underlying creditworthiness of loans by reducing their length and the amount financed and increasing their risk-adjusted yield, according to PeerIQ.

Data provider Orchard Platform said the average return on online consumer loans was 3.95 percent last year, which doesn’t seem sufficient unless the default rate was extremely low, especially compared with average returns of 6.93 percent in 2015.

The U.S. economy will slow at some point, leading to a reduction in loans and higher defaults. And eventually, all lending will be done online.

LendingTree Announces Top Customer-Rated Lenders by Loan Product for Q1 2017 (PR Newswire), Rated: A

LendingTree®, a leading online loan marketplace, today released its quarterly list of the top customer-rated lenders on its network based on actual customer reviews for the first quarter of 2017. The list features the top lenders in multiple loan product categories, including Mortgages, Personal Loans, Business Loans and Auto Loans, all of which are included in LendingTree’s online loan marketplace.

Lender rankings are based on a weighted average of overall rating and the total volume of customer reviews for mortgage, personal, business and auto loans. Lenders were rated on offered rates, fees and closing costs, responsiveness, customer service and overall customer experience.

Mortgage Category

1)

Insight Loans

2)

J.G. Wentworth Home Lending, LLC

3)

CBC National Bank

4)

Arcadia Financial Group LLC

5)

Veterans United Home Loans

6)

First Midwest Bank

7)

AmeriSave Mortgage Corp

8)

Wyndham Capital Mortgage

9)

First Direct Lending, LLC

10)

HomePlus

Personal Loans Category

1)

First Midwest Bank

2)

Lending Club

3)

Avant

Business Loans Category

1)

Seek Capital

2)

RapidAdvance

3)

Currency Capital

Student Loans Category

1)

RefiJet

2)

up2drive – a division of BMW Bank of North America

3)

rateGenius

How Will a Real Estate Lending Slowdown Affect Marketplace Lenders? (National Real Estate Investor), Rated: A

According to new statistics from the Mortgage Bankers Association, real estate lending is slowing down. Lenders closed $491 billion in mortgage loans in 2016, down 3 percent from the previous year. The decline in the last quarter of 2016 was even more significant, falling 7 percent in comparison with the fourth quarter of 2015.

In commercial real estate, reports show that the decline is even sharper. According to Real Capital Analytics, U.S. commercial property purchases were down 10 percent in 2016 from the previous year, and the trend seems to be continuing into 2017. U.S. investors purchased $50.3 billion in commercial property in January and February of 2017, compared to $80.1 billion during the same timeframe in 2016.

With $300 billion in loans coming due in the next 18 months, it is unlikely that the slowdown is a sign that the industry is poised for a more significant decline.

Strong outlook for marketplace lending

While banks will likely continue to have a small pullback in commercial real estate lending, the outlook for marketplace lending is strong. In 2015, alternative lenders originated 68 percent more loans than the year prior, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association. With American Banker reporting a 700 percent growth in the marketplace lending industry in just four years, this growth is poised to continue.

While commercial real estate lending as a whole may have been down slightly in 2016, the outlook for marketplace and other non-bank lenders is strong for 2017.

A Simple Macroeconomic Case For Avoiding Lending Club (Seeking Alpha), Rated: A

We believe the most commonsense case for avoiding Lending Club (NYSE:LC) as an investment is pretty simple and doesn’t involve a deep dive into the numbers. We think the reasons for avoiding peer to peer lenders can be explained simply and are relatively easy to understand. Lending Club, along with other peer to peer lenders and smaller aggressive regional banks, will likely be a poor investments in coming quarters as a shorter-term debt cycle turns over and the lowest creditworthy types of loans begin to see a spike in delinquencies and faults.

While Lending Club loves to point out to its investors and those who participate in its online marketplace that a lot of its borrowers have great credit scores, the reality of the situation is that the lowest creditworthy people who are denied loans elsewhere will drift to platforms like Lending Club in order to secure a loan they otherwise would not be able to obtain. This is just simply a function of lending markets: the least creditworthy people will find the lowest spot on the totem pole to borrow money.

Enter Lending Club, a pool of investors chasing high yield and borrowers who were likely unable to obtain credit elsewhere. We think the obvious outcome for the broader economy will be significant and continued pressure on all peer to peer lenders, not just Lending Club, going forward over the next couple of years.

Small banks warm up to marketplace lending for SBA expansion (American Banker), Rated: A

Marketplace lenders are slowly gaining traction with community banks eager to do more Small Business Administration lending.

Five Star Bancorp in Rocklin, Calif., is the latest small institution to follow the trend, agreeing earlier this year to try out SmartBiz Loans.

Is PayPal Co-Founder Max Levchin Making The Next Credit Card Killer? (Forbes), Rated: A

Now, Max Levchin’s latest venture, the financial technology company Affirm, is seeking to bring more accountability and transparency to the banking industry through what he calls “fair and honest financing.”

According to CreditCards.com, the average amount of credit card debt is about $9,600. If you make the minimum monthly payment, you could pay more than $11,615 in additional interest during the life of the loan — which is more than you originally borrowed.

Affirm lets shoppers pay for purchases — such as a Casper mattress or Peloton bike — over time with simple-interest loans that are free of any penalty or late fees.

Last month, the San Francisco-based company completed its 1 millionth consumer installment loan.

Max Levchin: We started Affirm 5 years ago with the thesis that we could build smarter underwriting and anti-fraud technology to improve on the tired traditional systems, and therefore create financial products that are simple, transparent, fairly-priced and free of incentive misalignment that so often defines consumer banking.

Since 2014, our loan volume has grown 40+ times over, we’ve added 900 merchant partners including Expedia, Wayfair, Peloton, Casper and Eventbrite, issued more than 1 million loans, all while maintaining an industry-first Net Promoter Score (NPS) of over 70.

Max Levchin: Since 2001, the [CFPB] found that more than 29 million consumers had been harmed by illegal practices perpetrated by bad actors in the finance industry.

There are also several legal, yet equally harmful, practices being used by the industry today that are disproportionately affecting the most financially vulnerable populations.

I would also like to see the CFPB affirm a consumer’s right to access and permission their financial data. Doing so expands access to credit for the 58 million Americans considered credit invisible – those with no credit files or insufficient information in their files to generate a credit score.

Max Levchin: Over the next few years, we [plan] to offer many more services expected from a modern financial institution, while bringing transparency to the industry where too often the customer has to lose for the service provider to win.

A new era for big asset managers? Glass Steagall and fintech (The Financial Revolutionist Email), Rated: A

The current clamor for breaking up America’s big banks should serve to remind those institutions to carefully manage the newfound freedom they will enjoy if Dodd-Frank gets defanged. It should also spur them to continue to seek out new risk-detection and monitoring technologies to avoid the kinds of systematic problems that sparked neo Glass-Steagallism in the first place. Does voice trading have a future?

It’s easy to believe that with the growing role of IM/chat messages, computer on computer communications, sophisticated algos and machine learning, the telephone is destined for oblivion when it comes to trading. But in a new survey conducted by Greenwich Associates, “voice” was reaffirmed as an important element to building trust and detecting nuance between trading counterparties. That’s good news for start-ups like Apple should buy Canada or PayPal.

So instead of creating a money transfer service from scratch, Apple should consider scooping up Venmo and the rest of PayPal with it (and/or A two pizza, Agile future for banks.

ANZ, for example, is the latest bank to announce that it would shift to Agile teams of about ten as a way to

JPMorgan formally quits R3 (Finextra), Rated: A

JPMorgan Chase has formally exited blockchain consortium R3, following in the footsteps of fellow titans Goldman Sachs and Banco Santander who split last November.

The departure comes as R3 continues to pursue fundraising efforts, looking to raise to raise $150 million from its members and strategic investors in return for a 60% stake in the business – a downgrade from its original funding target of $200 million.

Ping-pong capitalism: RE tech firms look to China for cash (The Real Deal), Rated: A

Real estate tech startups like LendingHome, Fundrise, Cadre, RealtyShares and Roofstock also raised money from Chinese firms.

Between 2011 and 2015, annual Chinese investment in U.S. technology companies rose from $300 million to $9.9 billion, according to research firm CB Insights, before falling in 2016 amid a general slowdown in venture investment. The data doesn’t break down how much money went into real estate technology, but sources said it holds a special appeal to Chinese investors.

Hone is backing the real estate investment platforms Roofstock, RealtyShares and Clara Lending, the Airbnb competitor Overnight and the drone-based property inspection service BetterView, among others, making it one of the most active Chinese investors in the space. The social media company Renren invested in mortgage platform LendingHome and crowdfunding company Fundrise, among others. Alibaba founder Jack Ma is an investor in Cadre, the Jared Kushner-backed real estate investment startup.

The fintech revolution is nigh. Our next move is critical. (The Hill), Rated: A

The technology of the future that is thought capable of revolutionizing financial institutions and its regulators is already here. But with no national plan to harness it for economic betterment or regulatory transparency, it may well represent another missed opportunity to restructure the financial system.

One need only look to the evolution of the internet, with its revolutionary concepts of distributed communication that fundamentally changed how the world and its financial institutions communicate. A similar revolutionary technology, distributed ledger technology (DLT), is promising to fundamentally change how financial institutions store and report information, but only if it can become a common good like the internet.

With the CAT rollout and data collection not yet begun, a more robust and comprehensive DLT solution could be proposed, one which combines important CFTC products with those of the SEC in a shared data collection undertaking.

The U.S. needs a comprehensive fintech and regtech (regulatory technology) plan to efficiently deploy DLT.

With standardization, fintech and regtech innovation can enable virtual global views of financial data that is disbursed throughout local computer nodes (data collection points) across the globe. But this is only possible if these nodes conform to both common data standards and common networking protocols.

On Deck Capital subsidiary amended and restated its existing asset-backed revolving debt facility (Reuters), Rated: B

* On May 4, 2017 subsidiary amended and restated its existing asset-backed revolving debt facility – SEC filing

* Fourth A&R credit agreement provides for increase in lender’s revolving commitments from an aggregate amount of $75 million to $100 million

Shark Tank Star Kevin O’Leary Loves Fintech. (Crowdfund Insider), Rated: B

Shark Tank star Kevin O’Leary, also known as “Mr. Wonderful” to some, is a fan of Fintech. O’Leary is sharing the love by delivering the Keynote address at the upcoming Benzinga Fintech Awards scheduled to take place this coming Thursday in New York City (May 11, 2016).  O’Leary is said to be a regular suspect at the Benzinga offices too.

O’Leary will be presenting the keynote at the pinnacle of the award celebration.

Alongside O’Leary the following executives will be presenting or participating;

  • Kathleen Murphy, President, Personal Investing at Fidelity Investments
  • Tim Hockey, President and CEO of TD Ameritrade
  • Ron Suber, President of Prosper Marketplace
  • Matt Burton, CEO of Orchard
  • Adam Dell, founder and CEO of Clarity Money
  • Bill Emerson, Vice Chairman at Rock Holdings
United Kingdom

P2P platforms predicted to shift to hybrid models (P2P Finance News), Rated: AAA

UK PEER-TO-PEER lending platforms are poised to shift towards hybrid models to stay afloat, a financial services think tank claimed on Monday.

The P2P industry has re-shaped the country’s small corporate funding and investment market, putting pressure on traditional lenders to step up their game, said the Centre for the Study of Financial Innovation. But it is now facing a plateau that may require it to expand into direct lending and balance-sheet operations, as well as cutting interest rates, to become profitable.

He pointed out that SME lending growth has become relatively stagnant and that less than half of UK small businesses are aware of new online sources of finance. This casts a shadow over the volume growth that P2P lenders need to achieve to become a mass market.

And in response to the digital innovation brought about by P2P players, traditional banks have begun to change the way they address the SME market, upgrading their online services and shortening their decision-making timeframes.

Attracting borrowers and scaling up investment volumes is going to be one of the key challenges for platforms going forward, the report said, alongside proving the soundness of their underwriting during a credit downturn and investing in continued innovation in customer service.

Millennials spend over a third of take home pay on rent despite price growth beginning to slow (LendIt), Rated: AAA

Cash-strapped millennials renting in the UK are spending upwards of a third of their take home pay of £17,359 on rental payments, according to the latest Landbay Rental Index, powered by MIAC.

For tenants aged between 18-39 and living alone, 69% of a monthly post-tax income of £1,447 is spent on £1,012 of rent. In a shared house of two people, overall rent of £1,152 adds up to 39% of each tenant’s income, while those co-habiting in a three-bed property would each spend 30% of their monthly take home pay on a rent of £1,322.

Rents have continued to rise over the last five years, increasing by 9% across the UK since April 2012 and by 8% in London – with monthly payments remaining a huge burden on those struggling to save, despite the pace of rental growth beginning to slow since August 2015, from 2.66% to 0.82%. While rents have begun to fall in prime Central London, outer boroughs popular with millennials, such as Barking and Dagenham, Havering and Bexley have seen rents grow by 26%, 18.9% and 18.2%.

Current accounts: How fintech is revolutionising personal banking (Independent), Rated: A

The gig economy continues to grow, with about 5 million people in the UK working as independents. It makes sense that a bank account provider would want to cash in on that and that is why Coconut has sprung up – to provide tailored banking for freelance and self-employed workers.

Customers can manage and track their income and outgoings via an app, and it even gives reminders of tax deadlines and the end of the financial year.

Increasing numbers of customers are relying on their phones for their daily banking, with data from the British Banking Association revealing that customers used their phones to check their bank balances 895 million times in 2015 alone, a number that is no doubt rocketing upwards.

A number of fintech start-ups are trying to capitalise on this trend and Monzo is one.

The app gives customers a real-time insight into what they are spending and how they are spending it, helping to budget and stay in the black. Users can access their account via an app that gives data on their daily and monthly spending, as well as the overall health of their account.

The first bank to gain a licence while being centred entirely around an app, Atom is racing ahead in the fintech current account stakes. It offers some far-sighted technological developments, including the opportunity to do away with passwords and even debit cards, instead relying on voice and face recognition.

And DiPocket is a new financial app that isn’t a bank but offers customers mobile banking facilities via a prepaid Mastercard.

Funding Circle’s Desai: use P2P for monetary stimulus (P2P Finance News), Rated: A

UK POLICYMAKERS should start using peer-to-peer platforms to stimulate the economy, Funding Circle’s chief executive and co-founder Samir Desai said on Wednesday.

The head of the country’s third-largest business lender called on the government and the Bank of England to bypass the banking system and inject monetary stimulus via P2P platforms, capitalising on the direct access they provide to the real economy.

New direct Lending fund targeting 6.5% yield seeks fresh capital raise (AltFi), Rated: A

The Edinburgh-based RM Secured Direct Lending trust is seeking to raise fresh capital just five months after its launch as it nears full deployment of its capital.

Launched back in December 2016, the closed-ended fund targets the SME lending space investing in loans it originates of between £2-10m. It specialises in secured debt investments and the portfolio has had a good run since its initial public offering (IPO) with most of its capital invested or moving towards deployment.

Total Net Assets are today £48.9m. Nearly £40m has been invested in a total of 11 loans, with borrowers ranging from a healthcare group, a UK high street retailer and a large UK/European forecourt provider.

What role can robots really play in the financial advice market? (The Herald), Rated: A

So, when Royal Bank of Scotland announced in March that it would be rolling out robo-advice for mortgage applications by the end of the third quarter it was clear that that particular innovation is no longer quite so innovative.

Put simply, websites such as Nutmeg, which is by far the best-known name in the fledgling UK market, present would-be investors with a range of questions designed to ascertain their attitude to risk before directing them to a model portfolio that should suit their needs.

However, the issue, according to Stephen Martin, head of Brewin Dolphin’s Glasgow office, is that even where needs are uncomplicated, robo-advisers can only go so far because they will never be able to tease out information peculiar to individual situations.

Hollands agreed, noting that while robo-advisers are a positive addition because they are helping open the investment marketplace to a wider range of people, they cannot be seen as a like-for-like replacement for full financial advice.

While the robo-advice market in the UK remains small, covering in the region of £1.5-2 billion of assets, research from Deloitte suggests that with more and more people having to take responsibility for investing their own pensions the potential for growth is high.

The accountancy giant found that 43 per cent of 35 to 44 year olds with a pension would use robo-advice on where to invest it, with those with the smallest pension pots, who may not be able to afford traditional financial advice, most likely to go to a robo-adviser.

5 ways to finance your start-up business (Business Zone), Rated: B

Business grants: In an unsettled economy, start-ups are seen to be important as a way of encouraging economic growth- this is why so many banks and publicly funded organisations are happy to support your ambitions.

Short term loans: One way in which you can look to finance your business is through a quick loan from a reputable company. Quick loans can help to offer you the perfect cash injection necessary to get your business up and running with the ability for the debt to be paid back over a series of repayments. The key with funding your business through a short term loan is in finding a loan with a low interest rate.

Crowdfunding: Peer to peer lending and crowdfunding have become an increasingly popular way for entrepreneurs to start up their own businesses.

Friends and family: Something to always consider when looking towards funding your own business is to pitch for funding from your family members and friends.

Angel investors: Angel investors can be a great source of investment and can be found in most cities.

China

WeiyangX Fintech Review (Crowdfund Insider), Rated: AAA

WeChat Pay, one of the biggest mobile payment platforms in mainland China, has boosted its cross-border business by entering the U.S. market.

One in four of those aged between 18 and 27 use pay-by-credit services Ant Check Later, a personal loan and installment service under e-payment provider Ant Financial Services Group, as these freer spenders form the very core of the country’s burgeoning consumer-credit landscape.

People born in the 1990s constitute 47.3 percent of the platform’s registered users. Among them, nearly 40 percent prioritized the service as a payment option over its sister service Alipay, China’s largest mobile wallet by market share. This is 11.9 percentage points higher than those born before 1985.

Baidu Financial has announced to launch new consumer mortgage products with the aim of encroaching on consumer credit market.

On May 2, the National Committee of Experts on Internet Finance Security Technology, which was sponsored by the National Internet Emergency Center and the Internet Society of China, released a piece of evaluation criterion for P2P online lending platforms.

The rating standards mainly include five aspects: corporate strength, enterprise qualification, operation indices, cyber security and social reflection.

In another attempt to secure a firm grasp on China’s Fintech market, Chinese tech conglomerate LeEco has turned its next venture towards insurance and fund consignment. Since 2015, LeEco has got several financial licenses on various fields: micro credit, private placement, insurance and fund. Specially, LeEco is trying to build a fintech ecosystem, which covers micro finance, equity management, fund and insurance sales.

CreditEase CEO Ning Tang on China’s Marketplace Lending Industry, Robo-Advisors, Credit Scoring, & More (CB Insights), Rated: A

In recent weeks, Ant Financial‘s Yu’e Bao surpassed JPMorgan’s US government money market fund to became the largest in the world, China Rapid Finance became the second Chinese P2P lender to go public on a major US exchange, and Ant Financial upped its bid to acquire MoneyGram, the second largest global money transfer provider.

On the state of marketplace lending in China

Two fintech sectors — payments and marketplace lending — are more mature than others in China, as they have been around for over 10 years, have massive scale, and operate within robust regulatory frameworks and ecosystems.

We think that, over the next decade, sectors like crowdfunding, robo-advisors, insurance tech, blockchain and blockchain-driven applications will emerge. Some are behind marketplace lending by 3 years, some by 5 years, and some are behind by even 10 years, but I think all will go through a similar process in China.

It took 10 years for marketplace lending to grow from an idea to an industry in China. Recently, there has been tightening in the market, but I believe a tighter market will help the industry become more stable and healthy.

On credit scoring in China

Regulators have adopted a strong view that credit scoring is key for China to develop its credit bureau system. It will be a very strict process.

Currently, we use eCommerce data, telecommunications data, bank and credit card data, insurance data, and social security data. Big data is very helpful, but alternative data needs to cooperate with traditional finance and credit data to make the risk evaluation model really work.

I think China will develop a multi-layer system. The core will be the credit bureau — consisting of core credit data — and around it will be different applications for different industries utilizing some industry-specific data. Around that will be additional ancillary data services utilizing big data for anti-fraud, marketing, and so forth.

Still, the core layer will look quite similar to what the US credit system looks like.

On insurance tech in China

The biggest pain point for the insurance industry in China is that it’s never sold in the right way.

We don’t need more insurance products, we need more education and intelligent matching.

Where CreditEase is investing

Chinese investors are in the process of building globally diversified portfolios. From our point of view, we help clients who already have foreign currency outside of China to invest in the US and other parts of the world.

We are still quite interested in opportunities in lending. For example, we invested in (former Lending Club CEO) Renaud Laplanche’s new venture, Upgrade. I believe there are still a lot of opportunities left over from marketplace lending 1.0. We are similarly interested in crowdfunding, insurance tech, and — not only robo-advisors — but also B2B fintech models helping the wealth management and asset management industry.

P2P Industry News (Xing Ping She Email), Rated: A

Over 60% Chinese P2P Lenders achieved profit

According to the latest statistics from Online Lending House, 28 P2P Lending platforms disclosed their financial results, accounting for 1.3% of all the platforms. In 2016, 17 (61%) platforms have achieved profit, while 11 P2P Lenders had a loss.

The data shows that the most profitable platform is Yirendai, with $1.12 billion net profit. However, another US listed platform, China Rapid Finance, has lost $0.23 billion. Excluding lost platforms and those with incomplete data, the average net interest rate of 17 platforms are 25.92%, performing well in profitability.

 

Lenders Revenue

(Million RMB)

Net Profit

(Million RMB)

NetProfit Rate Founding Time Public Company shareholding ratio
Yirendai

3,238

1,116.4

34.48%

Jul. 2012 YRD

direct listing

WeiDai Network

1,776.3

325.50

18.32%

Jul. 2011 HAKIM UNIQUE

12.38%

Niwodai

666.9

64.88

9.73%

Jun. 2011 Jiayin Fin-tech

100%

PPmoney

327.74

43.09

13.15%

Dec. 2012

Wan Hui Technology

100%

AVATAR China

35.03

20.90

59.65%

May. 2015

Neo Telemedia Limited

70%

UF-Club

189.82

19.61

10.33%

Nov. 2013 Hemei Group

51%

Yinhu Network

50.91

2.41

4.72%

Jul. 2014

Panda Financial Holding Corp., Ltd.

100%

PP100

37.85

-12.12

Aug. 2015 Nuode Share

40%

Lcfarm

58.84

-45.10

Mar. 2015 NoPoison

33.64

China Rapid Finance

385.43

-230.25

May. 2015 XRF

direct listing

The huge market of Auto Finance may reach to 1.85 Trillion RMB in 2018 

After the Internet Finance mania in China, more attentions now are paid to bank depository of the auto loan market. In China, with the rapid development of economy, cars gradually become ordinary people’s necessary life consumption, especially in developed areas, and almost every family owning a car.

Meanwhile, the large holding numbers and high liquidity of cars make it one of the most promising vertical field in P2P industry. It was reported that the number of car users in China are rapidly increasing, which contributed to the rapid development of the auto loan market.

According to the latest data, the total volume of Internet auto finance in China is expected to reach at 1.85 trillion RMB, driving the penetration ratio of consumer finance to about 30%.

European Union

Temenos hires FinTech heavyhitter for Marketplace (IBS Intelligence), Rated: A

Temenos has announced Duena Blomstrom as Chief Growth Officer for Marketplace, its online store of 100+ FinTech solutions that have been certified and pre-integrated with the Temenos Suites.

Blomstrom is well known in the FinTech sector as an analyst, entrepreneur and Angel Investor, a mentor for Startupbootcamp and Techstars, and the inventor of the Emotional Banking, EX and Bank Branding concepts. For the past 18 years, she has operated on the strategy and consulting side, be it for sales or marketing.

But banks are not easily displaced. Peer-to-peer lending, for instance, has grown rapidly, but still amounted to just $19bn on America’s biggest platforms and £3.8bn in Britain last year, according to AltFi Data, an analytics company. And some marketplaces now involve banks. Lex Sokolin, director of fintech strategy at Autonomous, a research firm, argues that music—one of the first industries to be attacked by digital revolutionaries—was fairly easily disrupted. Retailing was a little harder, but customers got used to not handling books, cameras and clothes before buying. Finance and health care, he says, are much more difficult. People are rarely inspired by financial products, says Mr Sokolin, which makes it costly to build a brand. It is easier to team up with those who already have the customers.

In the West, regulation is opening up more of the field to fintechs, both large and small. A revised European Union directive on payment services, known as PSD2, allows third parties to offer more convenient ways of paying online or to consolidate information from different accounts (with the holder’s permission) so that people can keep track of their finances. America has no equivalent, but the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, which oversees national banks, has proposed giving special licences to fintechs.

China’s digital behemoths worry less about such things. Companies like Ant Financial, the financial arm of Alibaba, an e-commerce giant, and JD.com, another online marketplace, have masses of data about those who buy and sell on their platforms. They know their spending habits and how much cash they can spare, so an easy next step is to offer them small loans. Big Chinese banks in any case neglect consumers and small businesses, so customers feel no loyalty towards incumbent lenders. Regulators have also been willing to let online companies shift into finance.

International

Q1 CYBERCRIME REPORT (ThreatMetrix), Rated: AAA

In the ever-evolving world of cybercrime, authentication continues to be a mainstay of global digital businesses; accurately recognizing trusted returning users and promoting a frictionless online environment builds a loyal customer base and reduces attrition.

However, cybercrime is becoming an increasingly global phenomenon, operating across borders in well organized criminal gangs, with knowledge sharing and centralized intelligence. Attacks continue to evolve quicker than the tools and techniques used to detect them.

Some key attack trends analyzed this quarter include:

  • The multifarious attack methods used in a 2017 cybercrime attack
  • The evolution of attacks from single to multi-vector approaches
  • Identity theft is a key issue for all industry sectors as they continue to see attacks involving stolen and synthetic credentials, harvested from omnipresent data breaches
  • The proliferation of RATs in the financial services sector
  • The sophistication of bot attacks
  • The only effective armor is to genuinely understand who your real customers are and how they transact, by collecting and processing all the information you know about them and using this to make informed risk decisions.
Source: ThreatMetrix

See the full report here.

Financial technology is proving less of a battleground than feared (The Economist), Rated: A

To be sure, a gang of newcomers have muscled their way into their domains. Peer-to-peer or marketplace lenders, such as Lending Club and SoFi in America, or Funding Circle and RateSetter in Britain, connect people and companies that want to borrow with those that have money to lend, promising both sides keener rates. Britain’s MarketInvoice allows small companies to borrow against receivables immediately, rather than turn to a bank or wait for bills to be paid. Digital banks such as N26 in Germany, Tinkoff Bank in Russia and an array of British hopefuls are challenging incumbents.

Islamic Fintech Alliance Publishes Fintech Industry Snapshop Report (Crowdfund Insider), Rated: A

The Islamic Fintech Alliance (IFT Alliance) has published its inaugural report on the emerging Fintech sector for the Muslim community.

Munshi is the founder and CEO of Ethis Ventures, a company that operates several platforms including crowdfunding. Mushis states that Muslims must unite to take advantage of this “unprecedented opportunity” to invigorate Islamic financial services with new forms of finance.

See the full report here.

Australia

Financial advisers should consider bitcoin as an asset class: Dunworth (Financial Standard), Rated: A

This week the cryptocurrency broke record-highs when it started trading above USD$1680 against the US dollar. As at May this year, the total market cap of the bitcoin market has more than doubled to US$23 billion since it hit the US$10 billion mark just three years ago.

“A lot of people say that bitcoin is very volatile. It is in the short term but if I were doing fund management for my client, I see it as a very good long term investment,” he said.

Cambridge University counts as many as 5.8 million unique users of the so-called crypto currency wallet, most of whom use bitcoin. More than 100,000 merchants and vendors now accept bitcoin as a form of payment albeit regulators warn that bitcoin users are not covered by refund rights.

Australia going cashless is great for fintech (AltFi), Rated: B

Australia is set to be an almost cashless society by 2020, promising benefits for fintech.

Since 2010, cash payments have declined a staggering 46 percent, and now make up less than 10 percent of all payments, according to new research by East & Partners Australia.

The hope for fintechs is that as payments go digital and the data supply increases, so too will demand for new technologies. It will also improve Australia’s attractiveness to foreign investors.

Writing in The Guardian, the economist Philip Soos denounced a cashless economy as empowering the security state and the banks.

India

Instamojo Wants To Help India’s Five Crore Small Businesses Transact Online (Bloomberg Quint), Rated: AAA

Digital modes of payment are becoming ubiquitous, riding on the government’s less-cash drive after demonetisation. Yet, Instamojo, a Bengaluru-based fintech company, feels not enough is being done for small businesses.

The company wants to help India’s micro, small, and medium enterprises receive payments online in a simple, hassle-free manner, said Sampad Swain, one of its founders and also the chief executive officer. The government last year projected that the number of such businesses has grown to over 5 crore.

The only two requirements for the company’s service to work is that both parties must have a mobile number and a bank account.

“If the mango seller wants to use our platform, he has to first do an e-KYC, which takes a few minutes,” said Swain. This can be done either through a mobile application that can be downloaded from the Play Store, or on Instamojo’s website.

The seller then generates a link by providing information on the ‘purpose’ of the transaction, and the amount that the buyer has to pay. In this case, the purpose would be a crate of alphonso mangoes, and the price would be Rs 1,700, Swain explained.

Once the link is generated, the seller can forward it to the buyer by any messaging mode, like WhatsApp, Facebook, email, or even an SMS. When the buyer clicks on the link, he or she is directed to Instamojo’s website, where a number of online payment options are available.

MENA

Middle East, North Africa (MENA) FinTech Update: Slow to Adopt or Miles Ahead? (EdgyLabs), Rated: AAA

Headquartered in Dubai, Wamda (which means “sparkle” in Arabic) is an organization that supports the entrepreneurial spirit and business initiatives in the MENA region. Along with PAYFORT, an online payment platform, Wamda Research Lab released a report that provides in-depth data about FinTech in MENA.

According to the ‘State of FinTech,’ over $100 million USD were invested in Fintech in the MENA region over the last decade, with $50 million expected for 2017 alone. In 2013, the number of Fintech startups was 46. Then, in 2015, that number increased to 105–with the United Arab Emirates leading the pack with 30 independent FinTech startups–and the overall MENA number is expected to reach 250 by 2020.

Authors:

George Popescu
Allen Taylor

Senate seeks online lending regulation, reaches out to CFPB

Senate seeks online lending regulation, reaches out to CFPB

Online lending is under fire, as Senate Democrats last week called for the regulation of the industry in a letter to various government bodies, including the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. To get some clarity on issues surrounding online lenders, Benzinga caught up with Glenn Goldman, CEO of the small business lender Credibly. Goldman spoke about the depiction […]

Senate seeks online lending regulation, reaches out to CFPB

Online lending is under fire, as Senate Democrats last week called for the regulation of the industry in a letter to various government bodies, including the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

To get some clarity on issues surrounding online lenders, Benzinga caught up with Glenn Goldman, CEO of the small business lender Credibly.

Goldman spoke about the depiction of lenders in media and the impact of the industry on the American economy. An edited transcript of the conversation is below.

What are some of the myths surrounding disruption in the lending industry?

What we’re seeing today is innovation and disruption not around a particular slice of the credit spectrum, but around user experience and the availability of capital.

After the bust of the first Internet bubble, folks did not go back to using fax machines. The fact is, what the lending industry has done in terms of creating a far superior user experience — following on how gaming, social, travel, and virtually every other industry has moved online — has created an opportunity to get more capital to the folks who need it and lowering people’s cost of funds along the way.

[Another myth I see] is the demise of innovative lending. But I just want to spend a second talking about what I mean by “innovative lending.” We as an industry have been challenged in coming up with what we should be calling ourselves. “Peer-to-peer,” in the early days, captured the essence of what the models were about in many ways, but that quickly evolved to perhaps institutional-to-peer. “Marketplace” implies that there’s a pure marketplace that’s operating, matching up borrowers and lenders in a hands-off kind of way. But that also implies a singular source of financing; that the financing for those individual loans comes from “the marketplace.”

So what makes “innovative lending” a better description of the category?

I think what we’ve seen over the last six months or so is really a convergence of all these models, that whether you call yourself a marketplace lender, a peer-to-peer lender, even an online lender — probably less than 40% of online lenders actually originate their business online — they all seem to try to define something that is evolving.

In fact, trying to define a lending model by how you finance it belies the fact that platform should have access to multiple sources of financing. And so I do want to give a quick shout out to the ILPA, the Innovative Lending Platform Association, for coming up with a name and approach that really defines what we do, which is all about innovation.

Again, we watched social, gaming, travel, and music, all go through significant innovation. Lots of capital helped to fund a number of very interesting business models, and it ended up that they were not all perfect business models. There was a thinning of the herd. All of our lives are now changed in how we interact with each of those product and service offerings, as has our lives been changed by having access to capital if you’re a small business, and lowering your cost of capital if you used to pay 25% on revolving credit. So I don’t think innovative lending is going anywhere, it’s just going through the process of getting stronger.

 

Glenn Goldman, CEO of Credibly

 

What’s something that isn’t discussed enough in the lending conversation?

I talk a lot about the importance of having diversified sources of funding available to you regardless of how you originate assets. I typically look to categorize them into an on-balance sheet, whole loan sale, and securitization, and there are variations on each of those. Some are permanent and some are not. Some are committed and some are not. And while we are starting to see the creation of funds that are truly permanent in nature, in that their mandate is very specific to invest in assets originated by platforms, it’s going to be really important for platforms to also avail themselves of committed capital.

Credibly was born as an on-balance sheet company, so by definition, we had committed capital. It requires you to really get your mind right about the value and importance of data science and risk management. For this industry to continue to thrive, buyers and investors in loans are going to need to see platforms with a stronger incentive to make sure that those areas of business are well-developed.

Can you tell me more about the popular view of online lending and the innovative lending industry?

I had an opportunity to be on a panel a couple of months ago, and we were talking about how folks were predicting the demise of innovative lending, and that the challenges that the industry was facing were a sign that it was just a really bad idea. And the fact is that for the five or 10 years leading up to that panel a couple of months ago, this industry of ours has helped reduce the cost of funds to consumers by probably hundreds of millions of dollars.

What’s the impact of that?

Those savings either go into true savings or go back into the economy. And over that same period of time, providers of capital to small business have made sure that small businesses that historically weren’t able to access capital were able to access capital.

Those funds are used to open new locations and hire people — we all know that small businesses represent roughly 60% of GDP and roughly 60% of our labor force — and during the short time we’re sitting here today, our industry will probably do more of that to the tune of $10 million to $20 million. There’s a significant social benefit that we’re helping to create, and none of what we’re reading about in the press is going to change any of that.

Author: Benzinga News